Globalization and Home-Based Workers

Citation:

Carr, Marilyn, Martha A Chen, and Jane Tate. “Globalization and Home-Based Workers”. Feminist Economics 63 (2000): , 6, 3, 123-142. Web. Copy at http://www.tinyurl.com/yybkurnp
globalization.pdf235 KB

Abstract:

Globalization presents threats to and opportunities for women working in the informal sector. The paper, which draws on the work of Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO) Global Markets Program and of HomeNet, focuses on women home-based workers and analyzes, within the framework of global value-chains, the impact of globalization on labor relations and other market transactions. The chains reviewed are: manufactured goods (fashion garments); agricultural products (nontraditional exports); and nontimber forest products (shea butter). The paper shows how this form of analysis helps to identify the uneven distribution of power and returns within the chains – between rich and poor and between women and men. It concludes by emphasizing the importance of the work of the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA), HomeNet, and StreetNet in organizing home-based workers, both locally and internationally, as well as that of WIEGO in supporting them.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 08/20/2014