Political Empowerment

2018 Oct 15

Women Running for Office 101

6:30pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Join us for a training session with IOP Fellow Amy Dacey. The session is co-sponsored by the following student groups at HKS: Women in Power PIC, Electoral Politics PIC, and City & Local PIC.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics and the Women and Public Policy Program at Harvard Kennedy School.

Jessica Preece

Jessica Preece

Associate Professor in Political Science at Brigham Young University
WAPPP Fellow

Jessica Preece’s research focuses on the role political party messaging and recruitment plays in women’s political representation. As a WAPPP Fellow, she will develop interventions for party leaders interested in seeing more women run for and win office.

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Ghazal Zulfiqar

Ghazal Zulfiqar

Assistant Professor at the Suleman Dawood School of Business, the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Pakistan
WAPPP Fellow

Ghazal Zulfiqar’s research is focused on analyzing the different approaches to global and local advocacy for marginalized women workers in the informal economies of the Global South.

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Solidarity: Transnational Women's Rights from Suffrage to NGOs

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

“Solidarity” takes an intersectional approach to the study of women’s and sexual rights in transnational perspective from the late nineteenth century until today. In this course, we will explore how American feminism, particularly through the fight for women’s suffrage, set the agenda for issues of equality and sexual rights around the world, often in complex and contradictory ways. Through a semester-long engagement with Schlesinger Library collections on transnational feminist and women of color feminisms, we will investigate feminist links to and critiques of the imperial project – from anti-trafficking campaigns in colonial and postcolonial India, to transnational feminist labor movements in the Philippines and Bangladesh, to the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Together, we will think about the complex relationship of feminism and war, the place of feminist thought in debates about incarceration and immigration, and the contradictory role of feminism in global movements for rights. 


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Global Feminisms

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Feminism shapes the world we live in today. Debates about women's and sexual rights define almost every public debate today -- from sexual harassment, to electoral politics, to development, public health, and human rights. But when, and where, did ideas of women's equal rights and liberation emerge? This course digs into the deep history of feminism from a global perspective. It traces the intimate relationship between feminism, colonialism, and racism in case studies from America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, from the eighteenth century until today. We will immerse ourselves in rare materials on transnational and global feminism in the Schlesinger Library here at Harvard. Over the course of the semester, you will build a toolkit of critical thinking and writing skills by engaging diverse primary sources, including political writings of women of color and colonized women, short stories, posters, movies, and human rights reports. You will come away from the course having a deeper understanding of ideas of equality and justice that define politics today.
Readings will highlight marginalized authors, women writers, especially women of color authors, from previously enslaved women in the US South to indigenous people to colonized women in India and Africa. Reading assignments will focus on primary historical sources and encompass diverse genres, from political thought and speeches to fantasy fiction to posters.
Students will build critical skills through assignments that build source analysis skills over the course of the semester, including an annotation of visual materials (a poster or cartoon), short primary source analysis papers using materials from Schlesinger Library, and a final film analysis paper.

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I Will Survive: Women's Political Resistance Through Popular Song

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

This course will examine how women, through popular music, have articulated a clear political analysis of their oppression that has reached large audiences and become foundational to American culture. We will begin with African-American blues in the early 20th century and move through jazz, torch singing, folk, girl groups, disco, and contemporary song. Along with music readings we will include biographical, historical, and critical texts that will place these women in their artistic and political contexts. Performers studied will include, among others, Bessie Smith, the Boswell Sisters, Billie Holiday, Marian Anderson, Peggy Lee, Joan Baez, Gloria Gaynor, and Amy Winehouse.

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Topics in Gender and Culture in Japan: Seminar

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

This semester, Spring 2019, the seminar will examine theories and practices of feminism in Japan and elsewhere.  In particular, we will study several forms of “radical feminism,” including women’s liberation movement or ribu in early 1970s Japan.  We will explore “radicality” in feminism, articulated against the grain of discourses on women’s rights and equality.  Topics treated in the course include, radical feminism and the New Left, feminist genealogies, feminism and violence, the politics of feminist manifestos, feminism and futurity, and the feminist politics of organization.  Some of the reading materials are in Japanese.

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Race, Gender, and American Empire

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

This seminar explores the culture and politics of American imperialism from the late 19th century to the present, with particular attention to race and gender. This writing and discussion-intensive course encourages students to examine how formal and informal imperial relations developed, and to analyze how American empire functioned on the ground for those who imposed it and those who resisted, appropriated, or accommodated it. The course focuses especially on American relations with Asia and Latin America, and topics include immigration, military occupation, gendered and racialized cultural engagement, international adoption, humanitarianism, and international development. Assigned readings bring together scholarship from American Studies, Women’s Studies, Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, and American History.

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Experiments in Justice, Gender, and Genre: Introduction to 19th - 21st Century French Literature

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

Gender identity and expectations; prison reform and the death penalty; personal accountability and protest; new media and modes of expression.  Writers in the 19th and 20th centuries grappled with these questions as we do today.  How do their sometimes revolutionary, sometimes surprisingly familiar approaches overlap with movements like Romanticism, Realism, Existentialism, and other new forms of fiction?  We will explore short works by Sand, Hugo, Balzac, and Zola; poetry by Baudelaire; drama by Camus; a novel by Colette; a graphic novel by Fres; and films by Berri and Tavernier.

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Transnationalism and the Francophone World: Race, Gender, Sexuality

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

This graduate course links different regions of the Francophone world and provides an introduction to the major debates about gender issues in postcolonial Francophone studies. We focus on the aesthetics and politics of writers who challenge the notion of a stable identity, be it national, racial or sexual. The course draws on the historico-cultural issues pertinent to each region (Africa, the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean). Writers include Mariama Bâ (Senegal), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe/France/USA), Ananda Devi (Mauritius and France), Fatou Diome (Senegal and France), Assia Djebar (Algeria/France/USA), Marie Chauvet (Haiti), Shenaz Patel (Mauritius), and Linda Lê (Vietnam and France).
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Feminist Political Philosophy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Political philosophy is the project of offering and evaluating answers to normative questions about politics—about how we as a society should get along and share in all the benefits and costs of living cooperatively. The “feminist” in “feminist political philosophy” can be taken to modify different aspects of that project. Unsurprisingly, then, work in feminist political philosophy is extraordinarily diverse. Notwithstanding some in-fighting about the right way to be a feminist political philosopher, this diversity is part of what equips us to make good progress in developing and refining answers to important political questions. Still, we might wonder what unifies these different traditions and methodologies. Many regard “the personal is political” as the unifying insight of contemporary feminist philosophy. This will be the unifying theme for us as well, as we work to better understand that slogan and explore its implications. We will begin by examining foundational work in contemporary political philosophy on theories of justice, as well as feminist challenges to that work. The tradition of liberalism is of particular interest, because the values it celebrates seem at once empowering and problematic from the perspective of feminist political philosophy. Ideals of liberty, individuality, and free choice can be deployed by feminists to critique unjust institutions, but they also appear to shield a great deal of injustice from censure. On the applied side, then, we’ll consider some “hard cases” for liberal feminist political philosophers: prostitution, pornography, and the gendered division of labor. Along the way, we’ll hear from some more radical voices, and we’ll explore intersections between feminism, social class, and race.
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