Negotiation

Chiara Trombini

Chiara Trombini

WAPPP Fellow

Dr. Chiara Trombini’s research focuses on judgment, decision-making, and negotiation. As a WAPPP Fellow, she examines the impact of cognitive and affective interventions for reducing gender biases in individual and organizational decision-making.

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Shira Mor

Shira Mor

Assistant Professor, Departments of Labor Studies and Public Policy, Tel-Aviv University
WAPPP Fellow

Shira Mor's research investigates the relationship between women’s identity structures and their performance in negotiations in order to identify a behavioral strategy that allows women to reap economic gains without incurring unfavorable social outcomes.

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Marc Grau-Grau

ISFamily Santander Chair Researcher, Universitat International de Catalunya
Academic Collaborator, International Center for Work and Family, IESE Business School
WAPPP Fellow

Marc Grau-Grau's research explores the benefits of fatherhood involvement for fathers themselves and their jobs. As a WAPPP Fellow, he is examining how men and women negotiate flexible work arrangements in their organizations and how structural conditions and gender dynamics affect those negotiations.

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Kray, Laura, Jessica A. Kennedy, and Alex Van Zant. “Not Competent Enough to Know the Difference? Gender Stereotypes About Women's Ease of Being Misled Predict Negotiator Deception”. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Forthcoming (2014): , 1-12. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

We examined whether gender differences in the perceived ease of being misled predict the likelihood of being deceived in distributive negotiations. Study 1 (N = 131) confirmed that female negotiators are perceived as more easily misled than male negotiators. This perception corresponded with perceptions of women’s relatively low competence. Study 2 (N = 328) manipulated negotiator competence (along with warmth and gender) and found that being perceived as easily misled affected expectations about the negotiating process, including less effective deception scrutiny among easily misled negotiators and lower ethical standards among negotiating counterparts. This pattern held true for women and men alike. Study 3 (N = 298) examined whether patterns of deception in face-to-face negotiations were consistent with this gender stereotype. As expected, negotiators deceived women more so than men, thus leading women into more deals under false pretenses than men.

 

 

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