Decision Making

2016 Sep 27

Debiasing Hiring Procedures

9:00am to 10:00am

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Laura Mather, Founder and CEO, Unitive    

Join a breakfast conversation with Laura Mather, Founder and CEO of Unitive, a technology start-up firm that tackles unconscious bias in hiring and promotions. Come learn some simple steps that you can do to debias your organization’s hiring procedures.  

Read more about Debiasing Hiring Procedures
Laura Gee

Laura Gee

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Tufts University
WAPPP Fellow

Laura Gee's research focuses the influence of group dynamics and social networks on individual decision-making. As a WAPPP Fellow, she is researching how to better design job postings in order to decrease the occupational gender gap.

... Read more about Laura Gee

Elizabeth Singer More

Elizabeth Singer More

Associate Director, Open Circle Jewish Learning, Hebrew College
WAPPP Fellow

Elizabeth Singer More's research examines the history of women, work, and the family. As a WAPPP Fellow, she plans to complete the manuscript for her book on the intellectual and political history of maternal employment in America from World War II through the mid-1990s.

... Read more about Elizabeth Singer More

Anna Raute

Anna Raute

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Mannheim
Lara Warner Scholar, Harvard Kennedy School
WAPPP Fellow

Anna Raute's major fields of interest are labor and public economics. Her research focuses on the effects of public policy on women’s fertility and labor market decisions as well as the effects of universal childcare attendance on children. 

... Read more about Anna Raute

2016 Nov 17

The More You Know: Information Effects on Job Application Rates in a Large Field Experiment

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Laura Gee, WAPPP Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Tufts University

In this seminar, Laura Gee presents the results from a 2.3 million person field experiment on a large job posting website, LinkedIn that varied whether or not a job seeker was able to view the number of applicants for a job posting. Her results show that while the intervention increases the likelihood that a person will complete the application process by 3.5%, women remained more likely to finish the application than men. Additionally, Gee finds that allowing job seekers to view...

Read more about The More You Know: Information Effects on Job Application Rates in a Large Field Experiment
Bohnet, Iris. What Works: Gender Equality by Design. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2016. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back, and de-biasing people’s minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Diversity training programs have had limited success, and individual effort alone often invites backlash. Behavioral design offers a new solution. By de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts. Presenting research-based solutions, Iris Bohnet hands us the tools we need to move the needle in classrooms and boardrooms, in hiring and promotion, benefiting businesses, governments, and the lives of millions.

What Works is built on new insights into the human mind. It draws on data collected by companies, universities, and governments in Australia, India, Norway, the United Kingdom, the United States, Zambia, and other countries, often in randomized controlled trials. It points out dozens of evidence-based interventions that could be adopted right now and demonstrates how research is addressing gender bias, improving lives and performance. What Works shows what more can be done—often at shockingly low cost and surprisingly high speed.

Pages