Liza Mügge

Liza Mügge

Assistant Professor of Political Science, University of Amsterdam
WAPPP Fellow
Liza  Mügge

Liza Mügge is an assistant professor in the political science department at the University of Amsterdam, associate director of the Amsterdam Research Centre for Gender & Sexuality (ARC-GS) and co-convenor of the Standing Group Gender & Politics of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR). Her research looks at the role of gender and ethnicity in parliamentary representation.

Bio

Liza Mügge is an assistant professor in the political science department at the University of Amsterdam, associate director of the Amsterdam Research Centre for Gender & Sexuality (ARC-GS) and co-convenor of the Standing Group Gender & Politics of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR). She was a visiting scholar at the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies at Harvard University in 2012. In 2013, she received a highly competitive research grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) for her research on political representation and intersectionality in Dutch parliament. In addition, she is an affiliated researcher of the Open Research Area-funded project Pathways to Power: The Political Representation of Citizens of Immigrant Origin in Seven European Democracies (PATHWAYS).

Mügge has published extensively on intersectionality, gender equality, migration, ethnicity, political representation, and transnationalism. Her monograph Beyond Dutch Borders: transnational politics among colonial migrants, guest workers and the second generation was published with Amsterdam University Press in 2010. She is co-editor of the dialogue section ‘Intersectionalizing European Politics: Bridging Gender & Ethnicity’ in Politics, Groups & Identities (2013, 1, 3) and guest-editor of the special issue of ‘Pregnant Politicians and Sexy Fathers? The Politics of Gender Equality Representations in Europe’ in Women’s Studies International Forum (2013, 41, 3).

Research Topic:

Gender and Ethnicity in Parliamentary Representation