Elisabeth Prügl

Elisabeth Prügl

Professor of International Relations; Director, Programme on Gender and Global Change, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva
WAPPP Fellow
Elisabeth  Prügl

Elisabeth Prügl is professor of international relations at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva where she also directs the Institute’s Programme on Gender and Global Change. Her research topic is Feminism Triumphant and Tamed: Understanding the Legacies of Mainstreaming.

Bio

Elisabeth Prügl is professor of international relations at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva where she also directs the Institute’s Programme on Gender and Global Change. With a PhD from The American University in Washington, DC, she has previously taught at Florida International University in Miami, and at the University of Bremen in Germany as a Fulbright Scholar. She served as the Graduate Institute’s Deputy Director for four years.

Prügl’s research focuses on gender politics in international relations and global governance. Recent publications include Transforming Masculine Rule (Michigan 2011), “If Lehman Brothers had Been Lehman Sisters …” International Political Sociology (March 2012), and Feminist Strategies in International Governance, co-edited with Gülay Caglar and Susanne Zwingel (Routledge 2013). Her current projects deal with gender expertise in international organizations, agrarian change and gender, conflict prevention and gender, and the neoliberalization of feminist movement ideas.

Prügl is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Civic Participation, and a member of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network providing technical expertise to the UN Secretary General’s High-level Panel of Eminent Persons on the post-2015 development agenda. From 2011 to 2012, she served as chair of the Feminist Theory and Gender Studies section of the International Studies Association, and from 2010 to 2013 as Associate Editor of Politics and Gender, the journal of the Women and Politics section of the American Political Science Association (APSA).

Research Topic:

Triumphant and Tamed: Understanding the Legacies of Mainstreaming