Harvard Gender Course Guide 2022 - 2023

Harvard University Gender Course Guide 2022 - 2023

Middle East Ethnography: Discourse, Politics, and Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

The discursive construction of culture and its complex politics are examined in a wide range of ethnographies that have been written recently on countries in the Middle East, including Lebanon, Jordan, Israel/Palestine, Egypt, Morocco, Yemen, and Iran. Among the theoretical topics to be considered are orientalism, colonialism and post-colonialism, nationalism, self, gender, and tribalism. 

 

Additional Information:...
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Psychology of Close Relationships

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course is an in-depth exploration of close relationships. Examples of topics to be covered include the biological bases of attraction; relationship formation; the end of relationships through break-up, divorce, or death; relationship satisfaction; deception; gender roles; same-sex relationships; loneliness; relationships and well-being; and public perceptions about relationships. You will have an opportunity to explore these topics primarily through critical examination of the empirical literature as well as through popular press. 

 

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Prison Law

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
While courses in criminal law tend to focus on the “front end” of the criminal legal process (investigation, prosecution, and verdict), this course focuses on the back end: the law of incarceration. What legal obligations does the state have toward those it incarcerates? Topics to be covered include: the evolution of prison rights litigation; the scope of constitutional rights in prison; the prison disciplinary process; the interaction of prison law and remedies; conditions of...
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Hindu Queenship

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course looks at the rich and complex traditions surrounding queenship in South Asia (the cultural area we will call jambudvīpa). We will look at the ways that queens have appeared in literature, inscriptions, and historical narratives, and at the ways the idea of queenship intersects with the categories of woman, wife, sovereign, and goddess. We will look at three millennia of queens, asking how South Asian queens have been thought about and written about, and how that changed over time. We will primarily look at Hindu traditions of queenship, but also engage Buddhist, Jain, and...

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Race in a Polarized America

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
How do we manage issues of race, ethnicity, and immigration in a polarized political era? What role did race play in the election of President Trump, after eight years of the presidency of Barack Obama? How can we be good citizens of the world when Americans have such mixed views and take such mixed actions in engaging with racial hierarchy, identity, or interaction? This course addresses these questions by examining policy disputes around issues such as incarceration and policing...
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Dangerous Words: Feminist Debates on Speech, Harm, and Representation

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

What does it mean to strike a balance between the democratic foundations of freedom of speech and rights of marginalized peoples to resist the subordinating words of the privileged? This course examines key debates in feminism, speech, and representation. Topics include pornography, cancel culture, trigger warnings, hate speech, slurs, and cultural appropriation. We will begin by orienting ourselves to the legal frameworks in the North America and Europe context around freedom of speech before turning to intersectional feminist, philosophical and critical theories analyzing the impacts...

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Understanding Who We Are: Development of the Self

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Who are you? And what has made you who you are? This course will examine classic and current theories and research in the development of self-concept, including our identity (e.g., gender, sexual, and social), self-esteem (e.g., body image, popularity, and sense of belonging) and personality. By exploring major developmental milestones and social-cognitive factors related to the development of a self, we will aim to understand how various forces contribute to our self-concept, and how our self-concept intersects with how we understand and navigate the world. 

 ...

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The First Nine Months

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
What makes a human? A baby develops from a single cell during the nine months of gestation, but the process that begins so simply has complications that stretch beyond the womb into questions of human identity and individuality. This course will explore the process of embryonic and fetal development, highlighting complicated questions such as the medical dilemma of maternal-fetal conflict, which occurs when doctors must evaluate the competing health needs of both fetus and mother....
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American Democracy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Democracy, inequality, and nationalism in America. The white working class and American politics. Class and race. Identities and interests. Conditions for socially inclusive economic growth and for the deepening and dissemination of the knowledge economy. Alternative directions of institutional change, viewed in light of American history. Democratizing the market and deepening democracy. Self-reliance and solidarity. We explore and discuss the past, present, and especially the...
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Sound and Color: Music, Race, and US Cultural Politics

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Although race is often presumed to be a visual phenomenon, it is also created and produced through sound. But what does race sound like? What might we learn when we attune our ears to the music and noise that race makes in popular music, on the stage, and in literature? How can texts like songs, films, and novels both reinforce and challenge cultural hierarchies and arrangements of social power? This course explores the sonification of race and the racialization of sound, music,...
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Poverty Law Workshop: A Toolkit for Addressing Inequity and Homelessness

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Low-income Americans, especially those experiencing homelessness, must contend with a vast patchwork of federal and state public benefits programs. This course will provide an essential grounding in these safety net programs for law students interested in public interest law careers, including future legal aid attorneys, public defenders, policy advocates, government leaders, and attorneys engaging in pro bono work.

The primary objective of this course is to examine the unique legal issues of the most economically vulnerable and marginalized populations – those experiencing...

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Social Demography Workshop

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

The Social Demography Workshop is a venue for graduate students and faculty to present research on a wide variety of topics such as family, gender, inequality, im/migration, fertility, mortality, and the institutional arrangements that shape and respond to population processes.

Additional Information:
Faculty: Alexandra Killewald, Mary...
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Cold War Germany: Art and Politics on Both Sides of the Wall

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This course provides a survey of the history and culture of divided Germany during the Cold War. It examines the conditions leading to the foundation of two separate states, the role of the Allied Powers in East and West Germany, the ideological conflicts between them, and their different responses to dealing with a shared fascist past. Drawing on sources from literature, film, radio, theater and art, we will engage with key political debates and societal changes, such as the “...
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Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Junior Year Tutorial: Research and Methods

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
In Junior Tutorial, students develop key research and writing skills necessary to write a junior research paper. We will read a range of texts that engage diverse methods in the fields of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies. Together, we will learn about methods and questions that form feminist engagements with archival research, literary and cultural studies, ethnography, quantitative and survey-based social science, and the sciences. Students will learn and engage with key...
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Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
This course is intended to provide hands-on practice toward doing research on Latinx issues, with an approach grounded in the understanding that terms ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latinidad’ are not static concepts and, at the same time, not a homogeneous mix. We will examine culture, intellectual production, languages, economics, and political thought, as well as the dynamics of Latino/a/e people in the United States. Throughout the class, students will become familiar with a wide range of...
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