Harvard Gender Course Guide 2018 - 2019

Harvard Gender Course Guide 2018-2019

Maximizing Human Capital and Organizational Performance

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2018

This course provides a broad overview of scientific theory and research-based strategies for effectively leading organizations and optimizing human capital. Students will gain a greater understanding of: mission and values; hiring, retention, and promotion; motivation and engagement; executive judgment and decision-making; informal power and social influence; culture and fit; organizational change; social networks; equity, diversity, and inclusion; and building self-efficacy and fortitude.   By the end of the course, students will possess a well-stocked toolkit that will enable them to be more competent, confident, and resilient when pursuing their leadership objectives. Students will also develop a deeper understanding of the challenges and social responsibility associated with leadership, and will engage in considerable self-reflection in order to gain a greater sense of clarity about their personal leadership style, mission, and purpose.
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Psychology of Diversity

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

The United States is becoming increasingly diverse and the world increasingly globalized. The central focus of the course is on the links between diversity and psychological processes at individual, interpersonal, and international levels. We consider several basic questions, including: What is diversity? How do race, nationality, and religion influence individuals? What impact does diversity have on cross-group relationships? How is diversity related to people's perceptions of fairness and justice? What is the relevance of people's perceptions of fairness and justice to social problems and social change? Does respect for diversity promote peace and positive change? Much research has addressed these questions, and we closely examine the evidence that has emerged so far.
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The Black Male Body

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

This course examines the ways that contemporary American intellectuals, particularly novelists and filmmakers, have attempted to rework and resist the many (negative) images of African American men in mainstream media.  With a particular emphasis on the ways that these artists figure black corporeality, we will examine illness, enclosure, physical violence, work, sexual practice, and aging.  Focusing on the period from the late 1960s to the present, students will be asked to map the historical development of images of black masculinity and to consider ways that these images might be either expanded or disrupted.
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Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar: Promoting Gender Equality at Work

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

The Gender and Public Policy Seminar has been designed to give students an opportunity to engage with leading-edge scholars and practitioners working to advance gender equality. Because the subject of “gender and public policy” is too wide ranging and global to address within a single semester, we aim to focus the course each year on a “spotlight” issue.

The spotlight focus for the Spring 2019 semester is promoting gender equality at work. More specifically, the seminar will cover policy-relevant research on workplace discrimination, pay equity, family leave, and sexual harassment. Coverage of these topics will include intersectional perspectives on gender and critical discussion of the limits to as well as benefits of state policy. The research will include some international comparative perspectives but will be primarily U.S.-based.

The class meets Tuesdays and Thursdays. The first and final weeks of the semester will be devoted, respectively, to framing and presenting on students’ field projects. Students will work in groups on seminar-relevant research projects for real clients engaged in promoting gender equality at work. On all other Tuesdays, students will take turns leading a class discussion of the assigned readings. On Thursdays, students will participate in a research seminar with invited speakers. The Thursday sessions will be hosted by the HKS Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) and be open to the HKS community. Readings for the Tuesday class sessions will provide background and a broader research perspective on the Thursday presentations. We will work to arrange opportunities for interested students to meet with the visiting speakers.

This course is likely to be particularly beneficial to students who are interested in understanding and working to address barriers to gender equality at work. Our primary objective is to equip students with a theory-based understanding of the primary obstacles to gender equality in the workplace and with a quiver of potential organizational and policy interventions.
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Establishing Loving Spaces for Learning: Nurturing Gender & Sexual Identity Development in US Schools

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

(New course.) This course explores both the role of gender and sexuality in shaping young peoples' schooling experiences, opportunities, and outcomes, and the role of schooling experiences in shaping young people's notions of gender and sexuality. In many ways, the course is about the "hidden curriculum" of heteronormativity, or the subtle practices in schools that privilege heterosexual, gendered identities and ways of being. As such, students in the course will apply the concept of the hidden curriculum to the study of gender and schooling in order to understand why and how children and youth with different gender identities experience schooling differently and why and how heteronormative schooling detrimentally impacts all students. By the end of the course, students should be able to: (1) identify specific strategies that educators at various levels might use to support students in negotiating gender and sexuality norms; (2) identify tools that schools can use to build positive, nurturing environments, which open up possibilities for complex gender and sexual identity development; and (3) analyze and evaluate a variety of school practices, curricula, policies, and programs that seek to support healthy gender and sexual identity development for U.S. children and adolescents. The course will provide opportunities to consider the ways in which other elements of identity (e.g., race, culture, socio-economic status, age, geography, etc.) intersect with gender and sexuality in the process of identity development. Although schools will be the central setting examined, course materials are also applicable to community-based settings.

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Discovering Femininity in the Gendered Language of the Qur’an

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

Does the Qur’an enunciate a distinctive concept of femininity? If so, what is it? This course explores the meaning of gender and femininity in the Qur'an by approaching the text on three levels: vocabulary and grammar; meaning in context; and what can be called "the latent meaning of the text." Most traditional Qur'anic exegesis is on the second level, interpreting verses and vocabularies in light of their context. Recently, some scholars have noticed the importance of Arabic gendered grammar as a source for discovering ontological and epistemological gender setting of this text. Their works draw into question the presumed androcentrism of Qur’anic texts. Finally, the third level of meaning remains hidden even in many feminist approaches. To discern the latent Qur'anic view of women, we will investigate the meaning of “being woman” from the Qur'an’s God’s point of view.

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Women and Lived Religion in Contemporary Life

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This course offers theories and methods needed for the study of gendered experiences of religion in the contemporary world. Rooted in the tradition of sociology of religion, the course is organized around diverse theoretical approaches as well as exemplary empirical studies on women and religion. We shall focus on cases in the West as well as in East Asia." src="/profiles/openscholar/modules/contrib/wysiwyg/plugins/break/images/spacer.gif" title="<--break-->">

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Sex Equality

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

The relation between sex equality under law and sex and gender inequality in society is interrogated in theory and practice in the context of relevant social science, history, and international and comparative law. Mainstream equality doctrine is probed on its own terms and through an alternative. Cases largely on U.S. law focusing on concrete issues--including work, family, rape, sexual harassment, lesbian and gay rights, abortion, prostitution, pornography--structure the inquiry. Race, economic class, and transsexuality are mainstreamed. The purpose of the course is to understand, criticize, and expand the law toward sex and gender equality, including between women and men, as well as to expand the equality paradigm.

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Gender Violence Legal Policy Workshop

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This workshop offers the student hands-on experience in analyzing, evaluating, and creating legal policy on a range of issues related to gender violence. The three main areas of concentration are campus sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and sex trafficking and prostitution. We advise government officials (local, state and federal); national, international, and local advocacy groups working to stop gender violence; and individuals needing assistance in knowing their rights or accessing services. Recent activities include submitting comments to the White House Task Force on Protecting Students from Sexual Assault; helping an advocacy organization on preventing domestic violence homicide; and preparing a training for Middlesex County Police Chiefs on investigating sex trafficking rings.

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Gender Violence, Law and Social Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This course offers an in-depth examination of the phenomenon of gender-motivated violence. Following a consideration of the prevalence and variation of types of sexual violence and coercion around the world, we consider questions such as: How, if at all, is violence against women different from other types of violence? How effective have legal strategies to address violence against women been, and what shifts in thinking about gender-motivated violence would be necessary finally to eradicate it? How does the toleration of sexual violence shape people’s expectations and sense of entitlements? What are the implications of gender-based violence for the constitutional guarantee of equal protection of the laws? Does equal protection itself have a gendered meaning and reality? Among the types of violence against women we will consider are: intimate-partner violence; domestic homicide; prostitution; rape; sex trafficking of women and children; and violence against women facilitated by the Internet. The readings consist of primary and secondary materials drawn from several disciplines: law, social science, political science, psychology, evolutionary biology and women’s studies.

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The Neuropsychology of Sex Differences: Implications for Mental Illness

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

It is no mystery that men and women are biologically and behaviorally different, but the way these differences impact mental health has often gone unrecognized. Sex and gender have both been increasingly identified as significant factors in disease prevalence, expression of symptoms, and responses to treatment. As such, it is critical that we understand the influence of sex differences and the consequences of adopting a "one size fits all" approach to health care. Unfortunately, this understanding has historically been difficult, if not impossible, to achieve because most of the knowledge we have in this area is based on research conducted exclusively in males. This disproportionate focus on male data is slowly beginning to change, but there are still those who doubt whether the presence/impact of sex differences is significant enough to warrant further investigation. In this course, we explore this debate, focusing on the neurobiology, methodology, significant findings, and future implications of research on sex differences.<--break->

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Women, Peace, and Security

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This course examines the increasingly recognized role of women in global peace and security affairs, as recognized by United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325. Through politics, the military, non-governmental, and grass roots organizations, women are involved in conflict prevention, peace building, development, and war. Consideration is given to various perspectives on why gender empowerment has proven difficult, the demonstrated consequences of not including women in security affairs, and what might be expected in the future.

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Society and the Workplace: Power, Diversity, and Management Communication

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

In this course, we engage current societal discourses on power and diversity, including but not limited to gender, race, class, religion, and physical ability. We use the contemporary United States cultural context as a springboard to explore current issues of gender (for example, trans rights and pussy hats), race, (Black Lives Matter, Latino/a rights, visa processes, and border walls), class (the Occupy movement, border walls), and religion (the current US Administration's travel ban). Interrogating scholarly, legal, and popular publications, we map these power and diversity discourses onto the workplace, placing them into management contexts to better understand how such discourses enable and constrain our workplaces. In turn, we look at the ways our workplaces influence diversity issues in society. Throughout, we highlight the ethical implications of these actions.

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Sexuality and Public Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This course provides an introduction to the breadth of research and research methods in the study of sexuality and sexual health promotion in diverse contexts and populations. Students will develop skills needed to carry out epidemiologic research and community-based interventions related to sexual health promotion. Students will be introduced to ways to integrate conceptual models, methodologies, and perspectives from a variety of fields to inform a unique transdisciplinary, holistic approach to public health promotion of sexual health. Class session format includes lectures, discussions, case studies, individual and group presentations, and in-class writing assignments.

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Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This interdepartmental, interdisciplinary seminar will offer the chance to analyze ways by which diverse constructs of gender influence public health research and practice. Using different examples each week, the core WGH faculty and students will focus on how gender contributes to classifying, surveying, understanding and intervening on population distributions of health, disease, and well-being. Discussion of these examples will draw on different disciplines, conceptual frameworks, and methodological approaches (both quantitative and qualitative). For example, traditional epidemiological and biostatistical methods, along with multilevel, ecosocial, and health and human rights frameworks will be applied, as appropriate, in the assessment of gender-based health related disorders. The format will include formal presentations and informal discussions. Students will create brief teaching examples that use gender-based analysis while cultivating core skills in public health.<--break->

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