Graduate Courses

WAPPP's affiliated faculty teach a variety of courses at Harvard Kennedy School—from how to negotiate with a gendered lens to understanding the role of sexual violence in war—all courses incorporate a strong gendered foundation. For a complete list of courses across Harvard with a gender focus, please go to WAPPP's Harvard Gender Course Guide.

Behavioral Science for Inclusive Organizations

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2017

This field course uses insights from behavioral science to promote organizational health, in particular, as it relates to equality, diversity and inclusion. Getting and staying healthy includes preventing undesirable events from happening, detecting issues when they arise and mitigating against the consequences as they occur. To promote healthy behaviors, organizations typically rely on “soft” instruments such as awareness raising and appeals through training programs and information sharing, or “hard” instruments such as command-and-control through rules, carrots and sticks. This course argues that behavioral design or “nudges” offer a middle ground to establish healthy behaviors, often more powerful than awareness raising and less costly than shoves. In working with organizations across the sectors, we will design nudges promoting desired behaviors regarding effective talent management, organizational design that levels the playing field for all and inclusive culture. We treat lack of diversity and inclusion as a “want-should” dilemmas, where people know what they should be doing but then, do not get around to doing it. Behavioral design helps people bridge this intention-action gap. The course emphasizes evidence-based reasoning. Students will learn how to diagnose the “behavioral health” of an organization, design potential treatments for what is broken, and rigorously evaluate their impact, using big data analytics and experimentation. Students will work in groups and partner with an organization—a tech start-up having developed behaviorally inspired software to help organizations address these issues or an organization (company, government or International Organization) interested in advancing equality, diversity and inclusion through the use of behavioral design.

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Conflict and Collaboration: Intra- and Inter-group Dynamics

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2017

Whether your aspirations are to work domestically or internationally, collaboration across difference is an inescapable imperative of leadership for the public interest. Contemporary levels of conflict and instability make the capacity to work effectively across difference a fundamental requirement of political, diplomatic, and military leadership. Innovation in the government sector is dependent on the capacity for policy makers to work across political divides and increasing involves collaboration across agencies and with business and civic leaders. Service to communities in need—whether from the private, public or nonprofit sectors—requires a capacity to analyze and bridge differences in perspective on the barriers to and opportunities for enhancing social and economic welfare, health, and education. Whether managed locally or internationally, environmental sustainability requires the engagement of a broad range of stakeholders. Moreover, in all sectors and policy areas, work teams have become progressively demographically diverse in terms of gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, and national culture. his module will equip students with fundamental concepts and frameworks for analyzing pitfalls and opportunities for collaboration across social identity- and group-based differences within teams and across organizational boundaries. Key concepts are drawn from research on biases in individual and group decision-making, group dynamics, social network analysis, and organizational diversity perspectives. The module is designed for students to learn and practice applying course material through interactive exercises, case analyses, and self-reflection so that students enhance their personal potential to lead in the global work environment.

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Economic Development: Using Analytical Frameworks for Smart Policy Design

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2018

This semester-long course examines how economic theory and rigorous evidence can be harnessed to design development policies that respond to market and political failures in developing economies. The course builds on the analytical framework and evidence base provided in PED-101 (which is a prerequisite). Topics covered include: Policies for Productivity Growth, Policy Design for Markets in Human and Financial Capital, Governance Reform and Environmental and Climate Change Policy Design. Prerequisite: PED-101.

This course is open to MPA/ID students. Others by permission of the instructors only.

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Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2018

This course will examine the various typologies of modern forms of slavery - sex and labor trafficking, bonded labor, forced labor, and the worst forms of child labor. It will examine modalities of recruitment, transit, and exploitation as well as patterns and trends in countries of origin, transit, and destination. It will explore who is exploited and why, as well as the business models upon which these types of exploitation exist with the purpose of understanding vulnerabilities for effective intervention. It will also examine international laws, policies, and conventions intended to tackle the issue. National strategies and best practices, both in the U.S. and elsewhere, will be examined for effectiveness at designing policy interventions. This course will be particularly relevant for students who may work in situations where humanitarian protections are necessary for the most vulnerable populations - refugee camps, conflict and post-conflict settings, natural disasters, and settings of extreme poverty.

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Maximizing Human Capital and Organizational Performance

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2018

This course provides a broad overview of scientific theory and research-based strategies for effectively leading organizations and optimizing human capital. Students will gain a greater understanding of: mission and values; hiring, retention, and promotion; motivation and engagement; executive judgment and decision-making; informal power and social influence; culture and fit; organizational change; social networks; equity, diversity, and inclusion; and building self-efficacy and fortitude. By the end of the course, students will possess a well-stocked toolkit that will enable them to be more competent, confident, and resilient when pursuing their leadership objectives. Students will also develop a deeper understanding of the challenges and social responsibility associated with leadership, and will engage in considerable self-reflection in order to gain a greater sense of clarity about their personal leadership style, mission, and purpose.

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Sex, Violence, and Global Politics

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2017

In this course, we will consider the international dimensions of sex, gender and violence, largely within the context of war and conflict. Both academic scholarship and current policy debates are informed by powerful—and often unquestioned—assumptions about sex, gender and violence. Recent research has started to challenge some of these ideas, and policymakers are responding with calls for better data, increased attention to long-hidden problems, and new strategies to confront these difficult problems. In the course, we begin with a review of theoretical constructs, then turn to a series of policy relevant questions on the politics of sex, gender, and violence. Topics that we will cover include gendered causes and consequences of war (e.g., Does gender inequality cause conflict? Are women leaders more peaceful? What are the consequences of war, for women and men?); gendered motivations for political violence; sex and gender within armed groups, including the military, insurgencies and terrorist organizations; and wartime sexual violence. The course will include discussions of research design and implementation, as well as the implications of research on policy responses and interventions.

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