Graduate Courses

WAPPP's affiliated faculty teach a variety of courses at Harvard Kennedy School—from how to negotiate with a gendered lens to understanding the role of sexual violence in war—all courses incorporate a strong gendered foundation. For a complete list of courses across Harvard with a gender focus, please go to WAPPP's Harvard Gender Course Guide.

"Unwelcome": Addressing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace and on Campus

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

This module will focus on the challenging legal, policy and organizational issues ingrained in various approaches to the pressing public problem of sexual harassment in the workplace and on campus, including examination of the structures and interventions - successful and not - that organizations have developed to respond to that policy environment in practice. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of what is considered “sexual harassment” in the law , what are the actual...

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"Unwelcome": Addressing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace and on Campus

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

This module will focus on the challenging legal, policy and organizational issues ingrained in various approaches to the pressing public problem of sexual harassment in the workplace and on campus, including examination of  the structures and interventions – successful and not - that organizations have developed to respond to that policy environment in practice. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of what  is considered “sexual harassment” in the law , what are the actual experiences and career effects on those who have experienced it, what ...

Read more about "Unwelcome": Addressing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace and on Campus

21st Century Global Feminisms

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

If girls “run the world”, why is gender equality so hard to achieve? It has been 100 years since women gained voting rights in the US and many European countries, 70 years since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and China’s state policy of gender equality, 50 years since the transnational Women’s Liberation movement, and 25 years since the UN Beijing Declaration. Yet, as a group, women and girls lag behind men and boys in almost every metric of social and economic power globally – and systematic data about gender non-binary people are scarcely available. This course is designed to empower students as change agents in the fight for global gender equality through a three-part toolkit: conceptual foundations; structural analyses; and repertoires of action, policies, and praxis. Our goal is to gain confidence and fluency in key terms, concepts, and debates in feminism and gender issues to facilitate dynamic learning and collaborative action. We will then learn to analyze, map, and interrogate gendered power structures locally and globally, seeking to understand how gender works in concert with other inequalities from women’s homes to the halls of power. How might we explain: why some countries and contexts are further along than others in achieving gender equality; why patriarchal backlash is so persistent; and whether capitalism is compatible with feminism? Finally, this future-oriented course turns toward feminist practices, policies, and actions that have been implemented and enacted from the individual to the national level. We will examine different strategies for achieving equality – their promises and pitfalls – seeking out opportunities for innovation and future transformation.
This course is built on intersectional and decolonized approaches to feminism, which serve as the state-of-the-art starting point for achieving gender equality in the 21st century. The course refers to feminismsbecause pluralism is both an empirical fact underpinning gender politics in global perspective, and a normative commitment for learning from feminist movements’ multiplicity and diversity. Throughout the course we will discuss various forms of oppression and discrimination as they relate to inequality – including racism, imperialism, and economic exploitation. However, this course is primarily focused on analyzing feminist and womxn’s struggles for freedom, rights, and dignity and will therefore engage with overlapping hierarchies as intrinsic to understanding how gendered power works (another course might examine the inverse to equally illuminating effect). Early on we will examine and discuss the gender binary that dominates most cultures’ conception of and language for describing sex, gender identities, and social norms. Students will be given time and tools to examine their own gendered identities, experiences, and social-political and -economic positions. And – in light of this work – we will commit to read, speak, and listen freely and inclusively, with rigor and kindness in accordance with community norms set by the class.... Read more about 21st Century Global Feminisms

21st Century Global Feminisms

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021
If girls “run the world”, why is gender equality so hard to achieve? It has been 100 years since women gained voting rights in the US and many European countries, 70 years since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and China’s state policy of gender equality, 50 years since the transnational Women’s Liberation movement, and 25 years since the UN Beijing Declaration.... Read more about 21st Century Global Feminisms

Gender and Public Policy Seminar: Promoting Diversity in Organizations

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

The Gender and Public Policy Seminar has been designed to give students an opportunity to engage with leading-edge scholars and practitioners working to advance gender equality. Because the subject of “gender and public policy” is too wide ranging and global to address within a single semester, we aim to focus the course each year on a “spotlight” issue. 

The spotlight focus for the Spring 2020 semester is promoting race and gender equality at work. More specifically, the seminar will cover organizationally-relevant research on workplace discrimination, and offer a model...

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Gender, Sex and War (Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020
The Gender and Public Policy Seminar has been designed to give students an opportunity to engage with leading-edge scholars and practitioners working to advance gender equality. Because the subject of 'gender and public policy' is too wide ranging and global to address within a single semester, we aim to focus the course each year on a 'spotlight' issue.... Read more about Gender, Sex and War (Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar)

Inequality at Work: Contemporary Problems and Policy Solutions

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Work is at the core of daily life for most American adults. But the experience of work, of having a good job or a bad job, is starkly unequal and by many accounts work has become more precarious and more polarized over the past several decades. We begin with a broad overview of shifts in American society and the economy that are both backdrop and cause of these changes in work - the transformation of the American labor market by the forces of financialization and de-unionization, changes in American families in terms of family structure, women’s labor force participation, and care giving obligations, and retrenchment in the welfare state.... Read more about Inequality at Work: Contemporary Problems and Policy Solutions

Negotiating Across Differences

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020
Whenever you are not operating in isolation, it is not sufficient to design a technically perfect solution to a policy problem; negotiation skills are critical in gaining support from diverse stakeholders so that change can be implemented. This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation by emphasizing both analytical and interpersonal skills.... Read more about Negotiating Across Differences

Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021
In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Understanding Gender in International Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Gender affects multiple aspects of international development, including the challenges that communities face around the world, and how organizations and governments can most effectively support these communities to achieve their goals. This course covers gender theory and frameworks, drawing from feminist writers and scholars from a wide variety of backgrounds and disciplines.... Read more about Understanding Gender in International Development

Violence, Gender, and Global Politics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

In this course, we will consider the international dimensions of gender, sex and violence, largely within the context of war and conflict. Both academic scholarship and current policy debates are informed by powerful—and often unquestioned—assumptions about sex, gender and violence. Recent research has started to challenge some of these ideas, and policymakers are responding with calls for better data, increased attention to long-hidden problems, and new strategies to confront these difficult problems. In the course, we begin with a review of theoretical constructs, then turn to a series of policy relevant questions on the politics of sex, gender, and violence. Topics that we will cover include gendered causes and consequences of war (e.g., Does gender inequality cause conflict? Are women leaders more peaceful? What are the consequences of war for people of different genders?); gendered motivations for political violence; the regulation of sex and gender within armed groups, including the military, insurgencies and terrorist organizations; and wartime sexual violence. The course will include discussions of research design and implementation, as well as the implications of research on policy responses and interventions.

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Working for Change: Understanding Gender in International Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

Gender affects multiple aspects of international development, including the challenges that communities face around the world, and how organizations and governments can most effectively support these communities to achieve their goals. This course covers gender theory and frameworks, drawing from feminist writers and scholars from a wide variety of backgrounds and disciplines. We will study gender as it relates to specific topics, including labor market participation and employment, education, violence against women and girls, peace building, civil society, and women’s leadership. We will learn what is known in each arena, and study which approaches work well and which do not. This course is intended to be an introduction to gender in international development; students with extensive experience in this area should consult with the instructor if interested.<--break->

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