Work and Gender Equity

Nadja Born

Nadja Born

WAPPP Fellow
Ph.D. Candidate in Organizational Behavior, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich
Nadja Born is an organizational psychologist who studies stereotypes and biases and how we can improve people’s decisions and behaviors on topics ranging from... Read more about Nadja Born
2021 Dec 02

Organizational Work-Family Policies and Hiring Discrimination Against Women and Parents

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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There is significant evidence that organizational work-family policies—such as parental leave, subsidized and on-site childcare, and flexible scheduling options—can have positive consequences for workers. At the same time, some theories posit that an unintended consequence of supportive work-family policies...

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2021 Nov 04

An ally you say? Supporting Black women in STEM settings via allyship cues

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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Black women have been historically excluded from STEM environments and face unique challenges stemming from their multiple marginalized identities. Lack of representation coupled with unsupportive STEM settings can lead Black women to question their belonging in STEM, and ultimately avoid STEM settings and...

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2021 Oct 28

Work-Family Programs and Non-Work Networks: Within-Group Inequality, Network Activation, and Labor Market Attachment

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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This research examines the effect of work-family programs in organizations on the quality of women’s work participation. The authors find that workers whose non-work networks are less likely to activate supportive resources will benefit more from organizational work-family programs. Drawing on novel data...

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2021 Oct 14

Regulating Sex Markets: Lessons Learned and Policy Implications

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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In this seminar, Shah will discuss the main types of regulatory frameworks that governments and policy makers implement across the globe to regulate sex markets, and will present some of the latest causal evidence about what we know (and do not know!) regarding the impacts of these various regulatory frameworks. She...

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2021 Oct 07

An Imperfect Match? Gender and Racial Discrimination in Hiring and the Unequal Burden of Proof of Skills and Experience Matching

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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Gender and racial discrimination in hiring screening decisions remains a feature of the U.S. labor market, and has been well-studied in existing research. Yet, less is known about whether or how levels of discrimination vary depending on characteristics of the applicant and their match to the job’s requirements....

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2021 Sep 23

The Role of Gender, Race, and Culture in Shaping Negotiation Behaviors

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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Much of the existing literature on gender differences in negotiations indicates that women are at a disadvantage, due to socially prescribed gender norms and backlash for those who do not conform. However, this gender difference is not universal. In taking an intersectional approach to examine the role of both...

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2021 Sep 09

Supply- and Demand-Side Effects in Performance Appraisals: The Role of Gender and Race

12:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Event (Registration Required)

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Performance reviews in organizations across the sectors are common but controversial. Managers’ subjective appraisals of their employees’ performance and employees’ self-evaluations might be affected by demographic characteristics and be biased in complex ways. Analyzing the data of a multi-national financial...

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The Causes and Consequences of Inequality

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Since 1980, inequality has increased sharply in the United States, select other high-income countries, and many emerging economies. Inequality in U.S. income and wealth today are at levels not seen since the end of the Gilded Age. These changes at the national level reflect widening disparities in earnings between less-educated workers and those with college or advanced degrees, the concentration of earnings at the very top of the income distribution, and growing divides in economic opportunity both across regions within countries and across neighborhoods within regions. In this course, we study the causes of inequality (including technological change, globalization, disparities in access to education, tax and regulatory policy, and gender and racial discrimination), the consequences of inequality for human well-being (in terms of consumption, health, and family structure), and the potential for public policies to improve access to economic opportunity (including early childhood education, assistance to needy families, subsidized health care, worker training, minimum wages, progressive taxation, anti-discrimination policies, place-based policies, and universal basic income). Students will acquire an understanding of the varied dimensions of inequality (by education, occupation, gender, race and ethnicity, place of residence, and national origin), analytical approaches to identifying the causal factors behind rising inequality, and familiarity with policy tools that govern access to opportunity and the post-tax distribution of income and wealth. The course is lecture based but will allow ample time for group discussion.... Read more about The Causes and Consequences of Inequality

Understanding Gender in International Development

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2022
Gender affects multiple aspects of international development, including the challenges that communities face around the world, and how organizations and governments can most effectively support these communities to achieve their goals. This course covers gender theory and frameworks, drawing from feminist writers and scholars from a wide variety of backgrounds and disciplines. We will study gender as it relates to specific topics, including labor market participation and employment, education, violence against women and girls, peace building, civil society, and women’s leadership. We will learn what is known in each arena, and study which approaches work well and which do not. This course is intended to be an introduction to gender in international development; students with extensive experience in this area should consult with the instructor if interested. Students of all genders are very welcome to join this course.... Read more about Understanding Gender in International Development

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