Political Participation

2016 Sep 01

WAPPP Open House

11:30am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Please join us to learn about the Women and Public Policy Program and our work of creating and sharing knowledge that helps close gender gaps in economic opportunity, political participation, health, and education. We will discuss our initiatives, fellowship stipends, and other student opportunities. 

Lunch will be provided. 

RSVP not required.

2015 Oct 23

Free Advance Screening of Suffragette

1:30pm

Location: 

Brattle Theater, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

The Harvard Community is invited to attend an advance screening of Suffragette starring Carey Mulligan, Meryl Streep, and Helena Bonham Carter. See the movie ahead of the October 23rd release date for free at Brattle Theater! The film's director, Sarah Gavron, will be in attendance following the screening for a question and answer session with the audience. All Harvard students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to attend.

*Harvard ID required

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2015 Sep 24

From Harvard Square to the Oval Office - Information Session

9:30am to 10:30am

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman Building room 102 at Harvard Kennedy School

Attend this information session to learn more and ask questions about the opportunity for Harvard graduate students to participate in an extracurricular political campaign training program. Applications are due by 9:00 am on Thursday October 8. More information and the application are available at wappp.hks.harvard.edu/oval-office-program

Light refreshments will be served.

Contact WAPPP Program Coordinator Danielle Boudrow at danielle_boudrow@hks.harvard.edu...

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Anita Gohdes

Anita Gohdes

Joint Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program, Belfer Center, Harvard Kennedy School
WAPPP Fellow

Anita Gohdes' research focuses on political violence, state repression, and the relationship between new media and conflict. During her fellowship, she is pursuing an empirical study of gender and political violence.

... Read more about Anita Gohdes

2015 Sep 10

Women and Public Policy Program Open House

4:00pm to 5:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Please join us to learn about the Women and Public Policy Program and our work of creating and sharing knowledge that helps close gender gaps in economic opportunity, political participation, health, and education. We will discuss our initiatives, fellowship stipends, and other student opportunities.  

Refreshments will be provided.  

RSVP not required.

Read more about Women and Public Policy Program Open House
Clayton, Amanda. “Women's Political Engagement Under Quota-Mandated Female Representation Evidence From a Randomized Policy Experiment”. Comparative Political Studies 48.3 (2015): , 48, 3, 333-369. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Do affirmative action measures for women in politics change the way constituents view and interact with their female representatives? A subnational randomized policy experiment in Lesotho with single-member districts reserved for female community councilors provides causal evidence to this question. Using survey data, I find that having a quota-mandated female representative either has no effect on or actuallyreduces several dimensions of women’s self-reported engagement with local politics. In addition, implications from the policy experiment suggest that the quota effect is not accounted for by differences in qualifications or competence between the different groups of councilors, but rather stems from citizens’ negative reactions to the quota’s design.

Clayton, Amanda, Cecilia Josefsson, and Vibeke Wang. “Present Without Presence? Gender, Quotas and Debate Recognition in the Ugandan Parliament”. Representation 50.3 (2014): , 50, 3, 379-392. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This article charts a new direction in gender quota research by examining whether female legislators in general, and quota recipients in particular, are accorded respect and authority in plenary debates. We measure this recognition in relation to the number of times an individual member of parliament (MP) is referred to by name in plenary debates. We use a unique dataset from the Ugandan parliament to assess the determinants of MP name recognition in plenary debates over an eight-year period (2001–08). Controlling for other possible determinants of MP recognition, we find that women elected to reserved seats are significantly less recognised in plenary debates over time as compared to their male and female colleagues in open seats.

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