Political Participation

2017 Oct 18

Behavioural Insights and Gender Equality in the UK

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

The UK Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) and the Government Equalities Office (GEO) will present the UK Government's recent reforms to increase gender pay transparency and their new 2-year research collaboration on applying behavioural science to improving gender equality in the labour market. The aim of the session is to share knowledge of the reforms, present early results, source ideas and explore ways in which academics from Harvard could get involved in improving gender equality in the UK.

The session is aimed at faculty members and doctoral students whose work is generally...

Read more about Behavioural Insights and Gender Equality in the UK
MacKenzie, Megan H. Female Soldiers in Sierra Leone. New York: NYU Press, 2012. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The eleven-year civil war in Sierra Leone from 1991 to 2002 was incomprehensibly brutal—it is estimated that half of all female refugees were raped and many thousands were killed. While the publicity surrounding sexual violence helped to create a general picture of women and girls as victims of the conflict, there has been little effort to understand female soldiers' involvement in, and experience of, the conflict. Female Soldiers in Sierra Leone draws on interviews with 75 former female soldiers and over 20 local experts, providing a rare perspective on both the civil war and post-conflict development efforts in the country. Megan MacKenzie argues that post-conflict reconstruction is a highly gendered process, demonstrating that a clear recognition and understanding of the roles and experiences of female soldiers are central to both understanding the conflict and to crafting effective policy for the future.
MacKenzie, Megan. “Securitization and Desecuritization: Female Soldiers and the Reconstruction of Women in PostConflict Sierra Leone”. Security Studies 18.2 (2009): , 18, 2, 241-261. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract
This article focuses on the construction of “soldier” and “victim” by post-conflict programs in Sierra Leone. Focusing on the absence of individual testimonies and interviews that inform representations of women and girls post-conflict, this article demonstrates that the ideal of the female war victim has limited the ways in which female combatants are addressed by disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs in Sierra Leone. It is argued that titles given to female soldiers such as “females associated with the war,” “dependents,” or “camp followers” reveal the reluctance of reintegration agencies to identify females who participated in war as soldiers. In addition, I argue that men and masculinity are securitized post-conflict while women—even when they act in highly securitized roles such as soldiers—are desecuritized and, in effect, de-emphasized in post-conflict policy making. The impact of this categorization has been that the reintegration process for men has been securitized, or emphasized as an essential element of the transition from war to peace. In contrast, the reintegration process for females has been deemed a social concern and has been moralized as a return to normal.

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