Political Participation

2018 Dec 04

The Meaning of the Midterms: Who Counted? Who Voted?

4:15pm to 6:15pm

Location: 

Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge MA

The year 2018 will be remembered for its surge in women’s candidacies. Whether through individual, high-profile victories or the sheer force of hundreds upon hundreds of women standing for office, the midterm electoral cycle reflected options at the local, state, and national levels that were starkly different from any that Americans have confronted before at the ballot box. This panel will offer an analysis of the election results through a diverse set of perspectives—academic, experiential, gendered, generational, geographic, and political—to...

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2018 Oct 15

Women Running for Office 101

6:30pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Join us for a training session with IOP Fellow Amy Dacey. The session is co-sponsored by the following student groups at HKS: Women in Power PIC, Electoral Politics PIC, and City & Local PIC.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute of Politics and the Women and Public Policy Program at Harvard Kennedy School.

Jessica Preece

Jessica Preece

Associate Professor in Political Science at Brigham Young University
WAPPP Fellow

Jessica Preece’s research focuses on the role political party messaging and recruitment plays in women’s political representation. As a WAPPP Fellow, she will develop interventions for party leaders interested in seeing more women run for and win office.

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Ghazal Zulfiqar

Ghazal Zulfiqar

Assistant Professor at the Suleman Dawood School of Business, the Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Pakistan
WAPPP Fellow

Ghazal Zulfiqar’s research is focused on analyzing the different approaches to global and local advocacy for marginalized women workers in the informal economies of the Global South.

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2018 Sep 06

WAPPP Open House

11:30am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Please join us to learn about the Women and Public Policy Program and our work of creating and sharing knowledge that helps close gender gaps in economic opportunity, political participation, health, and education. We will discuss our initiatives, fellowship stipends, and other student opportunities. 

Lunch will be provided. 

RSVP not required.

Women and Lived Religion in Contemporary Life

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This course offers theories and methods needed for the study of gendered experiences of religion in the contemporary world. Rooted in the tradition of sociology of religion, the course is organized around diverse theoretical approaches as well as exemplary empirical studies on women and religion. We shall focus on cases in the West as well as in East Asia." src="/profiles/openscholar/modules/contrib/wysiwyg/plugins/break/images/spacer.gif" title="<--break-->">

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Women, Peace, and Security

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

This course examines the increasingly recognized role of women in global peace and security affairs, as recognized by United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325. Through politics, the military, non-governmental, and grass roots organizations, women are involved in conflict prevention, peace building, development, and war. Consideration is given to various perspectives on why gender empowerment has proven difficult, the demonstrated consequences of not including women in security affairs, and what might be expected in the future.

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The Postcolonial Amazonian: Corporality, Gender, and Sexuality in Caribbean Literature

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2019

"Our black ladies have rather a tendency to the Amazonian cast of character..."--Mr. Hamden, arguing to Barbados legislature against a law that proposed a ban on whipping of female slaves, 1798

The difference between Euro- and Afro-Caribbeans, posited colonial writer Edward Long, was located in their bodies: slaves' physical development, thought, and above all sexuality were other than that of their white counterparts, he argued. In response, regional literatures developed textual strategies to reclaim rhetorically and physically colonized bodies, genders, and sexualities, multiplying possible understandings of race, wo/manness, and desire. This course provides an introduction to literature from the English-, French-, Dutch- and Spanish- speaking Caribbean while exploring a series of texts that address this problematic. How are histories of racialized genders and sexualities—beginning in the Middle Passage and continuing to the present day—experienced in the Caribbean? What interests do the misrepresentation of (hyper) heterosexuality serve, and (how) can transculturating gender and/or sexuality link to political empowerment? Reading poetry, songs, essays, and novels from Jamaica, Suriname, Cuba, Antigua, Haiti, Curaçao, Martinique, and Trinidad, the course will focus both on how ideas of race, gender, and sexuality are colonially constructed in specific times and places; and on how these constructions can be re-thought and re-worked to imagine gender and sexual transgression as postcolonial praxes.

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A Voice of One’s Own: Creative Writing in Women, Gender, and Sexuality

Semester: 

N/A

Offered: 

2018

How does one balance the demands of "politics" with the subtleties of "artistry?" In this course, we'll write and analyze short stories, paying close attention to key writing concepts such as characterization, voice, point of view, dialogue, and setting, while also investigating thematic issues related to women, gender, and sexuality studies. In addition, we'll read secondary readings by authors such as Audre Lorde, Dorothy Allison, and Adrienne Rich that illuminate the ways in which issues of power, agency, and voice have emerged as key themes in feminist writing. Frequent writing assignments, including written evaluations of peers' stories.

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