Economic Opportunity

2015 Apr 09

It Takes a Family and a Country: Cross-National Effects of Non-Traditional Gender Role Models on Gender Inequalities at Work and Home

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Kathleen L. McGinn, Cahners-Rabb Professor of Business Administration; Chair, Doctoral Programs, Harvard Business School

How does exposure during childhood to non-traditional gender role models—working mothers and female parliamentarians—shape men’s and women’s outcomes at work and at home? Across 25 countries, women, but not men, exposed to non-traditional gender role models during childhood are more likely to be employed, more likely to hold supervisory responsibility if employed, and earn higher wages than women whose mothers were home full time. At home,...

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2015 Mar 06

Cash Transfers as Basic Income: A Transformative Approach to Attack Poverty in India

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Malkin Penthouse

Presenter:

Renana Jhabvala, Chairperson, SEWA- Bharat/India

Chair:

Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, MIT and Co-founder J-Pal

Social policy in India is at a critical juncture. In that context, recently SEWA has been conducting pilot unconditional cash transfer “basic income” schemes, in which thousands of men, women and children have been receiving cash payments in their bank accounts, paid individually each month. The research has been compiled into a book based on the evaluation of the results, based on a modified randomized control trial methodology, covering 22...

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Klugman, Jeni, and Sarah Twigg. “Gender at Work in Africa: Legal Constraints and Opportunities for Reform”. Oxford Human Rights Hub 3 (2015). Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Expanding women’ s economic opportunities is critical for meeting the obligations laid out in major human rights conventions and for enhancing countries’ development prospects and eliminating poverty. Realising the potential of all people contributes to productivity and a more resilient society. This matters at the national, community, family and individual levels. As a recent qualitative study of women and men in 20 countries across the world concludes, “women’s ability to work for pay... may be one of the most visible and game-changing events in the life of modern households and all communities.

Klugman, Jeni. Voice and Agency: Empowering Women and Girls for Shared Prosperity. Washington, DC: World Bank Open Knowledge Repository, 2014. Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The 2012 report recognized that expanding women's agency - their ability to make decisions and take advantage of opportunities is key to improving their lives as well as the world. This report represents a major advance in global knowledge on this critical front. The vast data and thousands of surveys distilled in this report cast important light on the nature of constraints women and girls continue to face globally. This report identifies promising opportunities and entry points for lasting transformation, such as interventions that reach across sectors and include life-skills training, sexual and reproductive health education, conditional cash transfers, and mentoring. It finds that addressing what the World Health Organization has identified as an epidemic of violence against women means sharply scaling up engagement with men and boys. The report also underlines the vital role information and communication technologies can play in amplifying women's voices, expanding their economic and learning opportunities, and broadening their views and aspirations. The World Bank Group's twin goals of ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity demand no less than the full and equal participation of women and men, girls and boys, around the world.
2015 Feb 19

From Sexual Harassment to Selective Mistreatment: The Regulation of Gender at Work

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, T-102

Jennifer L. Berdahl, Montalbano Professor of Leadership Studies: Gender and Diversity, University of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business

Debate abounds about why women continue to be underrepresented in top management positions and in male-dominated domains. This presentation reviews research on an often subtle, but powerful and pervasive, organizational force that discourages men and women from engaging in non-stereotypical roles and behavior: The harassment and mistreatment of gender incongruent employees. The author’s research on this topic is reviewed,...

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2015 Apr 02

What Women Want

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, T-102

Deborah Rhode, Professor of Law, Stanford University

Why is it that women still fare worse than men on virtually every major dimension of social status, financial well-being, and physical safety? Sexual violence remains common, and reproductive rights are by no means secure. Women also assume disproportionate burdens in the home and pay a price in the world outside it. Deborah Rhode, professor of law at Stanford University, reviews why these issues are not cultural priorities and what can be done to change this.

2015 Mar 26

Competing At All Costs: Dysfunctional Competition and Gender

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, T-102

Pinar Fletcher, WAPPP Fellow, PhD candidate in Organizational Behavior, Harvard Business School

Costly sabotage occurs when individuals risk incurring losses in order to hurt their competitors. When are individuals more likely to engage in such dysfunctionally competitive behavior? Are there any gender differences in propensity to engage in costly sabotage? Pinar Fletcher studies these questions in three laboratory experiments.

“High intensity” competitions feature winner-takes all incentive schemes and performance feedback systems (e.g...

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2015 Apr 16

Pursuing Diversity in the Legal Market

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, T-102

Paola Cecchi-Dimeglio, Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Program on Negotiation, Harvard Law School; WAPPP Fellow, 2012-2014

Over the years the number of women attending law school has significantly increased. This however has not yet led to a proportional increase in female leaders in the legal profession. It raises the question of why this gender gap still exists even if the pipeline seems to provide sufficient numbers of talented women with the potential to rise to leadership positions in legal education and in the legal profession. To delve into this question, we...

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