Economic Opportunity

2015 Apr 09

It Takes a Family and a Country: Cross-National Effects of Non-Traditional Gender Role Models on Gender Inequalities at Work and Home

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Kathleen L. McGinn, Cahners-Rabb Professor of Business Administration; Chair, Doctoral Programs, Harvard Business School

How does exposure during childhood to non-traditional gender role models—working mothers and female parliamentarians—shape men’s and women’s outcomes at work and at home? Across 25 countries, women, but not men, exposed to non-traditional gender role models during childhood are more likely to be employed, more likely to hold supervisory responsibility if employed, and earn higher wages than women whose mothers were home full time. At home,...

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2015 Mar 06

Cash Transfers as Basic Income: A Transformative Approach to Attack Poverty in India

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Location: 

Malkin Penthouse

Presenter:

Renana Jhabvala, Chairperson, SEWA- Bharat/India

Chair:

Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, MIT and Co-founder J-Pal

Social policy in India is at a critical juncture. In that context, recently SEWA has been conducting pilot unconditional cash transfer “basic income” schemes, in which thousands of men, women and children have been receiving cash payments in their bank accounts, paid individually each month. The research has been compiled into a book based on the evaluation of the results, based on a modified randomized control trial methodology, covering 22...

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Klugman, Jeni, and Sarah Twigg. “Gender at Work in Africa: Legal Constraints and Opportunities for Reform”. Oxford Human Rights Hub 3 (2015). Web. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Expanding women’ s economic opportunities is critical for meeting the obligations laid out in major human rights conventions and for enhancing countries’ development prospects and eliminating poverty. Realising the potential of all people contributes to productivity and a more resilient society. This matters at the national, community, family and individual levels. As a recent qualitative study of women and men in 20 countries across the world concludes, “women’s ability to work for pay... may be one of the most visible and game-changing events in the life of modern households and all communities.

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