Economic Opportunity

Eliana Carranza

Eliana Carranza

Senior Economist, The World Bank Jobs Group
WAPPP Fellow

Eliana Carranza's major fields of interests are development and labor economics. Her research focuses on the empirical study of household behavior, including its implications on economic and demographic outcomes, and the status of women.

 

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Anna Raute

Anna Raute

Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Mannheim
Lara Warner Scholar, Harvard Kennedy School
WAPPP Fellow

Anna Raute's major fields of interest are labor and public economics. Her research focuses on the effects of public policy on women’s fertility and labor market decisions as well as the effects of universal childcare attendance on children. 

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2016 Dec 01

On Her Account: Can Strengthening Women’s Financial Control Boost Female Labor Supply?

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Simone Schaner, Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Dartmouth College

Across the world, the increasing use of digital payments for government to person transactions for social programs has provided an entry point for the world’s poor into the formal financial sector. This phenomenon begs the question: how can governments best leverage this opportunity to enable economic empowerment for women? This seminar explores research that uses a randomized controlled trial to assess how financial inclusion coupled with targeted benefit payments impact...

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2016 Nov 17

The More You Know: Information Effects on Job Application Rates in a Large Field Experiment

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Laura Gee, WAPPP Fellow; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Tufts University

In this seminar, Laura Gee presents the results from a 2.3 million person field experiment on a large job posting website, LinkedIn that varied whether or not a job seeker was able to view the number of applicants for a job posting. Her results show that while the intervention increases the likelihood that a person will complete the application process by 3.5%, women remained more likely to finish the application than men. Additionally, Gee finds that allowing job seekers to view...

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2016 Nov 10

The History of the 'Mommy Track'

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Elizabeth Singer More, WAPPP Fellow; Lecturer on History and Literature; Lecturer on Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, Harvard University

As women began to fill the ranks of management in the 1980s, the impact of motherhood on an individual’s career trajectory and the corporate balance sheet became a source of debate among feminists and business leaders. In this seminar, Elizabeth Singer More examines the “mommy track” argument that some feminists, most prominently Felice Schwartz of Catalyst, claimed would save businesses money by working to retain...

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2016 Oct 27

Workplace Negotiations and Gender in the Digital Age

11:40am to 1:00pm

Location: 

WAPPP Cason Seminar Room, Taubman 102

Alice Stuhlmacher, Professor, Industrial & Organizational Psychology, DePaul University

The gendered nature of workplace and personal negotiations is now widely recognized, but questions remain about the impact of technology in negotiation. Research shows several advantages of face-to-face negotiation compared to virtual negotiations, but the patterns seem to differ when comparing men and women. Several lines of theory suggest that the negotiator role changes for women in an e-negotiation compared to a face-to-face environment. In this seminar, Alice Stuhlmacher...

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