Classes

Human Rights and Humanitarianism in the Modern World

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Human rights and humanitarianism are fundamental to modern political ethics. Yet the moral consensus surrounding these terms obscures an often disturbing history. This course is an introduction to human rights and humanitarianism as frameworks for understanding European, imperial, and global history from the enlightenment to the present day. Rather than uncritically accepting a triumphalist narrative, we will explore how these concepts were constructed over time, asking how they were used in practice, whose interests they served, and how they enabled inequality and exclusion along axes of race, gender, class, and nationality even as they promised a more just world.... Read more about Human Rights and Humanitarianism in the Modern World

Identity and the Self in the Medieval Greek Tradition

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
This seminar explores the construction and complexity of identities in the Greek tradition (300-1500). Students will read fascinating narratives, biographies, and autobiographies, and will learn how to analyze them from historical and literary perspectives. Questions for discussion include political, religious, and ethnic identity in late antiquity and Byzantium, the meaning of being "Roman" and "Greek," the plasticity of self-representation, and the interpretation of religion, gender, and class as both social and cultural categories.... Read more about Identity and the Self in the Medieval Greek Tradition

Gender and Health: Introductory Perspectives

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health—specifically, the ways in which gender contributes to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course proposes to answer such questions as: How can understanding gender structures help us interpret public health research? How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and structures, such as gender, affect people's experiences and expectations of health? How is the success of behavioral change interventions and the validity of basic behavioral and evaluation research affected by gender?... Read more about Gender and Health: Introductory Perspectives

The Politics and Aesthetics of Mourning

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
In this course, we will study literary responses to and representations of loss, both public and private, in twentieth- and twenty-first-century French literature. We will investigate how mourning intersects with various theoretical and historical topics including gender and sexuality, the memory of war, and the AIDS epidemic. We will discuss how the particular intellectual contexts and historical events of the twentieth century brought about shifts in the way that individuals and communities experienced loss and worked through grief. We will consider how the work of mourning generates political as well as aesthetic questions, and we will ask how literature helps us to think about loss and to propose alternative models of mourning. Readings may include literary works by Marcel Proust, Simone de Beauvoir, Hervé Guibert, and Patrick Modiano. We will also look at theoretical writings on loss from a variety of perspectives, from psychoanalysis to deconstruction and queer theory.... Read more about The Politics and Aesthetics of Mourning

Rise and Fall of Postwar Japan

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
Examines Japan’s rise from the ashes of wartime defeat to global economic power and subsequent stagnation, with primary focus on society and economy.  Considers the value and the limits of a narrative of “rise and fall” as the framework for understanding the 75 years since World War II, with focus on trends in gender roles, social (in)equality, and human impact on the environment.  Asks how have people in postwar Japan, and the government, explained to themselves and the world the previous embrace of empire and war.... Read more about Rise and Fall of Postwar Japan

Racial Education

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021

In this seminar, we will think together about education as a site of radical imagination, turning to learning spaces from the 20th century to the present where people have envisioned and attempted to bring about different worlds. Major topics of the course will include: education and social change, critical pedagogy, the imagination, abolition, and worldbuilding. Throughout the course, we will look at course catalogues, manifestos, memoirs, newspapers, and other primary sources as well as theory and secondary scholarship in social movement history, critical pedagogy, literary studies, Black Studies, and women & gender studies. Together, we will ask some of the following questions: In what ways is education part of larger struggles for freedom and liberation? How do each of these educational projects seek to radically imagine and bring about other worlds? What kinds of learning spaces do we want to build today?... Read more about Racial Education

Experimental Economics

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
This course provides an introduction to experimental methods and their applications in economics. We will focus on (i) the use of lab experiments in establishing causal effects, testing models, and illuminating mechanisms; (ii) field experiments in behavioral economics; and (ii) the measurement of preference parameters and behavioral traits in lab-in-the-field settings. Topics include bounded rationality, wishful thinking, moral values and social image concerns, gender, the measurement of preferences in lab and large-scale survey settings, and the explanatory power of behavioral traits for field behaviors.... Read more about Experimental Economics

Emerging Issues in Humanitarian Response and Human Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
The course will provide an introduction to the foundational frameworks and constructs for humanitarian and human rights research and action. The course will prepare students to understand and engage in humanitarian response and human rights protection, while examining emerging critical challenges that have multi-dimensional global impacts. These issues include armed conflict, social oppression, climate change, famine, migration, ethnic and other forms of discrimination, and gender-based violence.  The major options for protection and support- including early warning, prevention, and mitigation strategies - will be analyzed through case studies and discussion of current research findings, and through the lenses of the norms, actors, and processes of international humanitarian and human rights law, operations, and policy.... Read more about Emerging Issues in Humanitarian Response and Human Rights

Advanced French I: The Contemporary Francophone World Through Cinema

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
In this advanced French language and culture course, you will explore Francophone cultures through contemporary films to build interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational modes of communication while activating analytical and creative thinking. Course materials include French-language films and corresponding literary texts, images, and supporting authentic materials such as posters and advertisements that will help you develop oral and written communication skills through close readings and cultural analysis. Course themes investigate contemporary issues at the heart of Francophone societies today, including deportation and (non)belonging, policing, ableism, education, Blackness, sexuality and transgender identity, as well as the role of the family. The structure of class will promote spontaneous exchange about films and topics studied, real-and real-time collaboration with classmates. Creative assignments include interactive writing assignments, short compositions, scripts, and a short film. No previous familiarity with film study is necessary.... Read more about Advanced French I: The Contemporary Francophone World Through Cinema

German History from Bismarck to Hitler

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
German History loomed like a specter over the twentieth century. In the twenty-first century, Americans have been debating the relevance and legitimacy of comparisons between German history and our contemporary world. How useful is German history for understanding our current moment? How might our present-day concerns distort what we see in the past? This course will examine the history of Germans in Europe and elsewhere, starting with the revolutions of 1848 and ending with the separation of Austria, West Germany, and East Germany following the Second World War. Themes will be war, insurrection, and terrorism, revolution and counter-revolution, gender and sexuality, reform, violence, anti-Semitism, racial thinking and racism, and migration.... Read more about German History from Bismarck to Hitler

Psychopathologies of Modern Life

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2021
What is the relationship between cultural change and individual pathology?  Are the stresses of modern life implicated in the emergence of new forms of psychic distress and mental illness?  Over the past century, psychological experts have identified new emotions, dissatisfactions, and disorders, producing an expansive catalogue of modern woes and fashioning a range of remedies.  With attention to variations across race and gender, we  explore the coalescence and cultural fortunes of, among other topics, the personality disorders (narcissism, BPD); trauma, PTSD; disorders of identity and of attachment; social anxiety, isolation;  gaslighting; Black Rage; greed, success neurosis, imposter syndrome; stress, coping, burnout.... Read more about Psychopathologies of Modern Life

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