Classes

Encountering Motherhood: Sacred Histories

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Childbearing, pregnancy, and motherhood, and the uncanny bond between mother and child have been focal themes in the history of religion since the Paleolithic period. This seminar considers the complex subject of motherhood through sacred histories from ancient Greece, Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Buddhism, Finnish epic, and select indigenous traditions. We will also read contemporary works in ...
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African Architecture

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

This course examines architecture in African in an array of contexts and historical periods. Emphasis will be given to the shaping of the built environment around core cultural, social, political and economic contexts. Questions of style, materials, design considerations, gender, class, religion, building genres, colonialism and globalization will be addressed. Students will gain a knowledge not only of key monuments and models of African architecture, but also of differential scholarly approaches to these striking traditions. 

 

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Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology I

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
This course provides master and doctoral students the opportunity to gain a background in reproductive and perinatal epidemiology and understand the unique methodological challenges to the field. The course will cover a range of substantive topics including: the biology of human reproduction; an evolutionary perspective of pregnancy; fertility and time to pregnancy; infertility and its treatment; complications in pregnancy; adverse perinatal outcomes such as preterm birth; fetal...
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Threads: Histories and Theories of Clothing and Fashion

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
This course focuses on fashion and clothing in Japan from the medieval period to the present day. It aims to build a knowledge base of historically contextualized case studies through readings, lectures, and discussions. In the process, it explores questions about clothing as a site around which societal debates occur, where personal and collective identities are shaped, and where foundational philosophical ideas come into focus. Theoretical readings will allow students to apply...
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Japan and Globalization

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
The main objective of this course is to provide students with a deeper understanding of how Japan has been impacted by and responded to structural changes brought about by globalization as a developed democratic polity situated in East Asia. Topics include Japan’s rise as a middle power, the idea of a liberal international order, trade, human rights, environment, territorial disputes, migration and refugees, gender inequality, and challenges posed by the Trump presidency....
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How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes. It is a comprehensive study of the representation of gender, love and sexuality in African American and...
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Vocal Production for the Stage

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Whether one is performing in a play, pitching an idea, presenting research, or leading a group, the ability to use one's voice effectively is vital to the success of the performance. A resonant and varied voice enriches communication whether in person, in a recorded video, or a zoom interview. Using several major techniques of voice training from the field of acting, students will learn the possibilities, nuances and power of the human voice. We will explore ideas around voice and...
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Genre Fiction Workshop: Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Speculative Fiction, Horror, The Ghost Story, The New Weird

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
The course will consist of two halves. In the first hour of each class, we will be doing close readings of an assigned text, with the aim of isolating some concept or aspect of the genre under discussion in order to take bearings for your own. The assigned reading is obligatory. We will look at the convergences and divergences in the various kinds and modes mentioned in the title of the course. We will be thinking of generic topoi, conceptual underpinnings, imagination, style,...
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Human Rights, Law and Advocacy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Human rights practitioners confront numerous ethical, strategic, and legal dilemmas in their struggles for social justice. This freshman seminar explores the underlying legal framework in which human rights advocates operate, and then uses specific case studies to consider the various challenges they must grapple with in their work. The seminar is designed to encourage students to critically evaluate the human rights movement while offering an introduction to some of the essential...
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Social Theory, In and Out of Africa

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Social Theory, In and Out of Africa examines some of the major con­cep­tual and methodological approaches that have shaped the history of social thought in, from, and about Africa. In so doing, it will address the historical roots, political invest­ments, and philosophical foundations of theory-making as they have taken shape in the crucible of empire, with Africa serving largely as the object of hegemonic Eurocentric knowledge-production. The readings will explore the interplay of...
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Comparative and International Legal Struggles Over Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

At the intersection of debates about religion, private morality and public policy, and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are lightning rods of controversy in most societies. While the pandemic revealed the precariousness of some advances, a wave of ethno-nationalism and conservative populism has brought a sharp backlash against SRHR in many countries across the globe. Drawing on case examples from multiple regions, as well as in supra-national human rights forums, the reading group will critically explore: strategies used to assert legal claims relating to involuntary...

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Post-Capitalist Possibilities: A Feminist Inquiry

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

What role might Feminist Theory play in making post-capitalist worlds possible? What capacities do we have as scholars to shape the world around us? What ethical responsibilities accompany this work? In this graduate seminar we will explore theoretical traditions that have contributed to post-capitalist thinking, including socialist feminism, feminist post-structuralism and anti-essentialist Marxism. To this mix we will bring other contemporary feminist approaches from the frontiers of socio-political thought on post-capitalist possibilities, including material semiotics, post-...

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Tasting Place: Food and Culture in America

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
We often associate specific tastes and foods with particular places, memories, and experiences. What would it mean, then, to center taste in our study of place and culture? How can places be tasted, and tastes be placed? In this class, we explore the relationship between taste and place within American culture, discussing how elements of nation, region, and identity are created, absorbed, and imagined through foods and their represented forms. The word “taste” has multiple meanings...
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Medeas of Seneca and Ovid

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Wife, mother, sister, lover, killer, free-lance witch: Medea is one of Greek myth’s most multifaceted figures—and she gets away with it all. This course surveys a range of depictions of Medea in ancient literature, investigating how writers represent her across context, genre, and time. Primary readings in Latin will focus on Seneca’s tragedy Medea and Ovid’s treatments in his epic Metamorphoses and the elegiac Heroides. Additional texts, including Euripides’ Medea and Apollonius’...
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Continuing Conflict: Old Challenges and New Debates

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
The course focuses on two theaters of continuing conflict: Afghanistan and the Sahel region in Africa, the world’s most conflict heavy region. Collaborating with UN Security Council non-permanent members, this class will examine these recent conflicts, its impact on women, and the role of women as peace builders. From the denial of women's and girl's education in the recent Taliban takeover in Afghanistan to Africa’s Sahel region’s climate collapse which has impacted a gathering...
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