Classes

Social Demography Workshop

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

The Social Demography Workshop is a venue for graduate students and faculty to present research on a wide variety of topics such as family, gender, inequality, im/migration, fertility, mortality, and the institutional arrangements that shape and respond to population processes.

Additional Information:
Faculty: Alexandra Killewald, Mary...
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Leadership from Inside Out: Self, Identity, and Freedom - With a Focus on Anti-Black Racism and Sexism

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Leadership can be exercised from many locations in a society–from authority positions and from the streets–yet in general, to lead is to live with danger. It often requires putting yourself on the line, disturbing the status quo, and working with conflict. Those who lead take risks and sometimes get silenced, marginalized, or killed.
 
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Power to the People: Black Power, Radical Feminism, and Gay Liberation

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

An introduction to the radical American social change movements of the 1960s and 70s. We will examine the specific historical conditions that allowed each of these movements to develop, the interconnections and contradictions among them, and why their political power faded, only to reemerge in new manifestations today. Along with historical analysis, we will examine primary source materials, manifestos, autobiographies, and media coverage from the period, as well as relevant films, music, and fiction. The class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. Midterm and final assignments...

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The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: The Ethics of Art

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
What, if anything, is the relationship between art and morality? Can art be immoral? Or is it a mistake to evaluate a work of art in such terms? Can the moral of a content of a work bear on its aesthetic value, that is, whether it is good art? What of the moral status of artists—does the (im)morality of an artist bear on the success of her work? Should art serve as an instrument of moral education? A force for liberation? A method of unifying people? How do the arts shape who and...
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Sound and Color: Music, Race, and US Cultural Politics

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Although race is often presumed to be a visual phenomenon, it is also created and produced through sound. But what does race sound like? What might we learn when we attune our ears to the music and noise that race makes in popular music, on the stage, and in literature? How can texts like songs, films, and novels both reinforce and challenge cultural hierarchies and arrangements of social power? This course explores the sonification of race and the racialization of sound, music,...
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Psychopathology of the Family

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

In this course, we will explore how the family impacts psychopathology, including relapse, recovery, and resilience, for a member with a mental disorder. We will examine the relationship between the family and mental health conditions like anxiety, autism, depression, personality disorders, and schizophrenia from a life course and a family systems perspective. We will also examine these relationships by discussing the biopsychosocial features of the family that impact child and adolescent psychopathology. The course will focus on contemporary approaches to family life (e.g., dual-earner...

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Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Global Perspective

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
This course is designed to provide an overview of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) from a global perspective with a focus on the most disadvantaged populations. The course will cover the most critical topics and dimensions in this field, i.e. historic, conceptual, research, methodological, policy, programmatic, rights, and advocacy. The themes will include the role of the global community in shaping the SRH agenda, sexual and reproductive rights, maternal health measurement and...
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Introduction to Feminist Science Studies

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
This seminar is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of feminist science studies. As the feminist movements of the 1970s began to change the American political landscape, academic feminists began inquiries into the marginalization of women in science – a debate philosopher Harding called “the woman question in science.” Feminist scientists began to examine sex, gender and race bias in their own disciplines. In consequence, they raised questions about androcentric – male-...
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Poetry Workshop: Form and Content

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
In this workshop, we’ll look closely at the craft-based choices poets make, and track the effects they have upon what we as readers are made to think and feel. How can implementing similar strategies better prepare us to engage the questions making up our own poetic material? We’ll also talk about content. What can poetry reveal about the ways our interior selves are shaped by public realities like race, class, sexuality, injustice and more?
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Queer/Medieval

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
The / in this course title can suggest a slippage or interchangeability; opposition and polarization; or erotic or romantic friction. This course functions as an introduction to queer theory as an intellectual tool with which to read texts far removed from the political, cultural, and social discourses from which queer theory emerged. We will ask: what can queer theory offer readers of medieval literature in its explorations of gender, sexuality, race, power, narrative, trauma, and...
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Implicit Bias: Science and Society

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

We coined the term implicit bias in 1995 to capture the idea that bias, i.e., a deviation from accuracy or values can be implicit, i.e., operate without conscious awareness or conscious control. The idea emerged from basic research on implicit social cognition (ISC), an area of scientific psychology that explores the hidden aspects of mental representations of self, other, and social groups. Today, 25 years later, the term implicit bias has transcended academic psychology and permeated contemporary culture where it is used and contested every day. In this seminar, we will study the...

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Metaphysical Poetry: The Seventeenth-Century Lyric and Beyond

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
In an age of scientific and political revolution, how do poets respond when common beliefs about God, humans, cosmic and social order, consciousness, and gender have been taken away? Modern poetry starts in the seventeenth century when poets, notably women poets, sought new grounds for poetic expression.
 
Additional Information:
Faculty: Gordon Teskey
Semester: Full Fall Term
Time: Tuesday, 3:45 - 5:45 pm
ENGLISH 90QM

Anyone's Germany: Redefining Identity in Contemporary German Fiction

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
What does it mean to be German today? Contemporary German society abounds with Grenzüberschreiter of varying kinds: generations who were raised in a divided Germany but came of age in a reunified, globalized Bundesrepublik; communities of multi-generational German nationals whose identities nevertheless inherit the problematic international labor-politics of both the East and the West; voices demanding greater visibility of Germany’s postcolonial legacy and sparking viral debates...
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Buddhist Life in Community: Monastic and Tantric Sangha in South Asian Scripture

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

The purpose of this seminar is to identify and reflect upon ethical principles of life in community, as articulated in the historical Buddhist monastic code, and then in Tantric scripture. We will spend the first half of the semester reading the English translation of the full Pali Vinaya. In the second half we will compare several Indian and Tibetan tantric works which refer to principles of community living. Among the themes for discussion will be notions of human anatomy and gender; bodily practices for living with others; material substances and possessions; honesty and...

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