Classes

Advanced Topics in Women, Gender and Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This interdepartmental, interdisciplinary seminar will provide a forum to analyze how diverse gender-related constructs (including identity and expression) influence public health research and practice. Invited speakers will give examples of cutting edge issues in public health research and practice, focusing on how gender contributes to understanding and intervening on population distributions of health, disease, and well-being, with an eye towards intersectionality in relation to racism, classism, heterosexism, transphobia, and other forms of social inequity and context. The structure...

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Elizabeth Bishop and Others

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This course introduces students to the poetry, literary prose, and artful correspondence of one of the major poets of the twentieth century, considering her innovations in all these genres. We will look at her writing in multiple genres alongside the mid-century shift from ‘closed’ to ‘open’ verse forms, and relate stylistic issues to the intellectual and social changes, and political and historical developments of the period. Bishop’s critique of received ideas about nationality,...
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Strange Tales: The Supernatural in Chinese Literature

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This course introduces students to traditional Chinese literature by focusing on “tales of the strange.” We will examine how ghosts, demons, fox spirits, and other liminal creatures haunt the literary imagination, stretching the possibilities of storytelling. Students will gain familiarity with masterpieces of Chinese literature and their intriguing afterlives in performance, film, and popular culture. Our discussions will consider how literary accounts of ghosts and the...
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Hindu Queenship

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course looks at the rich and complex traditions surrounding queenship in South Asia (the cultural area we will call jambudvīpa). We will look at the ways that queens have appeared in literature, inscriptions, and historical narratives, and at the ways the idea of queenship intersects with the categories of woman, wife, sovereign, and goddess. We will look at three millennia of queens, asking how South Asian queens have been thought about and written about, and how that changed over time. We will primarily look at Hindu traditions of queenship, but also engage Buddhist, Jain, and...

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The First Nine Months

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
What makes a human? A baby develops from a single cell during the nine months of gestation, but the process that begins so simply has complications that stretch beyond the womb into questions of human identity and individuality. This course will explore the process of embryonic and fetal development, highlighting complicated questions such as the medical dilemma of maternal-fetal conflict, which occurs when doctors must evaluate the competing health needs of both fetus and mother....
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Prison Abolition

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Is prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will...
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Understanding Who We Are: Development of the Self

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Who are you? And what has made you who you are? This course will examine classic and current theories and research in the development of self-concept, including our identity (e.g., gender, sexual, and social), self-esteem (e.g., body image, popularity, and sense of belonging) and personality. By exploring major developmental milestones and social-cognitive factors related to the development of a self, we will aim to understand how various forces contribute to our self-concept, and how our self-concept intersects with how we understand and navigate the world. 

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Queer and Trans Literature and Criticism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Queer and trans literary writing now, its parallels and its precursors, from late medieval to the present day, along with useful ideas about it. Some history, some theory, but mostly queer and trans and queer-adjacent literature. Marlowe, Rochester, K. Phillips, Wilde, Rich, Baldwin; some primary texts determined by *your interests,* including less-often-studied genres and media such as graphic novels and YA. 

 

Additional Information:...
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Embodying Gender: Public Health, Biology and the Body Politic

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course will focus on the social and biological processes and relationships from interpersonal to institutional involved in embodying gender, as part of shaping and changing societal distributions of, including inequities in, health, disease, and well-being. It will consider how different frameworks of conceptualizing and addressing gender, biological sex, and sexuality (that is, the lived experience of being sexual beings, in relation to self, other people, and institutions) shape questions people ask about and explanations and interventions they offer for a variety of health...

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19th and 20th Century Music: Seminar

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This reading-intensive seminar is intended to give you a fundamental knowledge of contemporary intellectual currents engaged with the study of musical practices in Latin America. We will examine major areas that have informed scholarship on Latin American music, including queer studies, performance studies, decolonization/decoloniality project, cultural diplomacy, critical race theory, disability studies, actor-network theory, and Latinx studies. The goal of this course is to gain...
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History and Human Capital

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Explores a range of subjects concerning human capital, historically, theoretically, and comparatively. Topics include human capital and economic growth, population and fertility, health and public interventions, education and training, economic inequality, gender and the family, slavery and race, and intergenerational mobility, all within the broad context of economic history. A research paper or significant proposal and a final exam are required. 

 

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Latin Elegy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Love, jealousy, angst… but make it fashion. Latin elegy on amatory themes flourished during the early years of the Augustan era (20s BCE), and the genre developed rapidly during the subsequent three decades. The canon of Latin literature records the names of four elegists (Gallus, Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid) and in this course we will read texts from all four, as well as works by elegists not included on that list, to track the hallmarks of this varied genre. One theme of the...
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Carceral Empire

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Mass incarceration is a catastrophe in the United States, especially affecting Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and poor communities. Different forms of carceral confinements have long been an integral part of the formation of the United States and other settler colonies in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on the history of Indigenous confinements. While the incarceration of Indigenous peoples today resembles the incarceration of other minoritized peoples, it has similar and...
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Law and American Society

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
At a time when the rule of law is imperiled, our democracy and equal rights of every kind under assault by multiple forces, the importance of understanding our constitutional system of rights and laws as essential to the fabric of the nation cannot be overstated. The course will examine law as a vehicle of political conflict and a defining force in American society in four dimensions: 1.) as it establishes individual rights, liberties, and the limits of toleration; 2.) as it attempts to resolve differences among competing constituencies; 3.) as it sets out terms of punishment and social...
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