Classes

Economic Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Which is more just: capitalism or socialism? And how does that question intersect with racial justice? Capitalism has long reigned as the ideological solution to organizing society, but it is also clear that the pursuit of seemingly boundless material gain for some comes at the expense of others. The US and other countries have seen growing discontent around an ever-widening gap between rich and poor, and around the racial dimensions of that situation. Socialism addresses this wealth gap, but has a complex relationship with racial justice, and has had a checkered past around the world....

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Reproductive Rights and Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

The course materials and discussions span constitutional law, the political and legislative processes, and health law. Course topics include abortion, contraception, pregnancy exclusion laws, rape and statutory rape laws, personhood and feticide laws, artificial reproduction, surrogacy, civil and criminal prosecution for fetal endangerment, and reproductive rights of incarcerated and detained populations. This course is historically grounded, spanning early matrilineality and hypodescent laws to the eugenics era, and concluding with contemporary debates related sex equality, racial...

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Feminism and Anthropology

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This course considers the relationship between feminism (as activist realm, as theoretical field, in its institutionalized form as gender studies) and anthropology. We will begin with early ethnographic writing by women and about women, and analyze some of the interventions feminists hope to make in anthropology. We will then examine the relationship between feminism and anthropology through two topics: kinship and politics. Our course will consider how feminist anthropologists...
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"The Words to Say It": 20th Century Women Writing in French, From Colette to Satrapi

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Motherhood, romantic love, independence, sexuality, citizenship, fantasy, death: these are just some of the themes explored in women's novels, written in French, during the twentieth century. Students will read four exemplary novels, exploring how they have finally become classics, even given what they say about life and what it means for women to write about it. At the same time, the advent and development of feminist and/or queer literary criticism over the course of the 20th...
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Psychotherapy and the Modern Self

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
What does psychotherapy offer our distressed selves that friends, family, self-help, and psychopharmacological remedies do not? The demand for therapy is currently at an all-time high, bolstering its century-long dominance as the preferred antidote to human unhappiness and misery, even as it is under sustained attack from critics characterizing it as self-indulgent as well as from platforms that would replace human therapists with chatbots and analysts with algorithms. This course...
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Literature, Diaspora, Migration, and Trauma

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course examines a diverse range of creative and critical discourses on trauma and the global African; East, South, Southeast, and West Asian (Chinese, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese); and Middle Eastern (Jewish, Palestinian, Lebanese); as well as Latin American diasporas. We focus on the connections among diasporas, displacement, migration, and trauma, and on the relationships of these phenomena and constructions and understandings of artistic and cultural identities, ethnicity/race...

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Leadership from the Inside Out: The Capacity to Lead and Stay Alive-Self, Identity, and Freedom-with a Focus on Anti-Black Racism and Sexism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Leadership can be exercised from many locations in a society–from authority positions and from the streets–yet in general, to lead is to live with danger. It often requires putting yourself on the line, disturbing the status quo, and working with conflict. Those who lead take risks and sometimes get silenced, marginalized, or killed. To lead through the dangers of change demands diagnostic integrity and skill. Many Kennedy School courses strengthen diagnostic skills by analyzing...
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Psychology of Close Relationships

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course is an in-depth exploration of close relationships. Examples of topics to be covered include the biological bases of attraction; relationship formation; the end of relationships through break-up, divorce, or death; relationship satisfaction; deception; gender roles; same-sex relationships; loneliness; relationships and well-being; and public perceptions about relationships. You will have an opportunity to explore these topics primarily through critical examination of the empirical literature as well as through popular press. 

 

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Educational Justice: Proseminar

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

This course will explore the kinds of experiences children should have in schools and how those experiences should be distributed. We'll proceed by examining key topics pertaining to educational justice, including competing principles of justice in the distribution of education (egalitarian principles, sufficientarian principles, prioritarian principles, etc.); competing reform agendas; the justifiability and relative priority of different educational aims (education for citizenship, education for...

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Poverty Law Workshop: A Toolkit for Addressing Inequity and Homelessness

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

Low-income Americans, especially those experiencing homelessness, must contend with a vast patchwork of federal and state public benefits programs. This course will provide an essential grounding in these safety net programs for law students interested in public interest law careers, including future legal aid attorneys, public defenders, policy advocates, government leaders, and attorneys engaging in pro bono work.

The primary objective of this course is to examine the unique legal issues of the most economically vulnerable and marginalized populations – those experiencing...

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Women's Voices in Asian and Asian American Literature

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This course introduces students to the writings of both canonical and lesser-known Asian and Asian American women writers. The course especially examines the works by Chinese/ Chinese American, Japanese/ Japanese American, Korean/ Korean American women writers. Moving from the pre-modern to contemporary era, the course will explore a range of women’s voices and experiences as reflected through poetry, fiction, diaries, and epistles. Authors will include Murasaki Shikibu, Li...
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Middle East Ethnography: Discourse, Politics, and Culture

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

The discursive construction of culture and its complex politics are examined in a wide range of ethnographies that have been written recently on countries in the Middle East, including Lebanon, Jordan, Israel/Palestine, Egypt, Morocco, Yemen, and Iran. Among the theoretical topics to be considered are orientalism, colonialism and post-colonialism, nationalism, self, gender, and tribalism. 

 

Additional Information:...
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Suburban Wars: The American Suburb in the Twentieth Century

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
For as long as suburbs have existed, they have been battlefields—sites of contestation where Americans have fought over their social significance, their place in the political economy of urban areas, and their role in the nation’s identity. This undergraduate seminar explores questions about the meaning of suburbs, their relationship with cities, and the ways that suburbs have intersected with the histories of race, class, gender, capitalism, architecture, political ideology, and...
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Migration in Theory and Practice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023

In this course, we will examine how and why people migrate from one location to another, focusing both on the theoretical paradigms scholars use to explain migration processes as well as on the individual experiences of migrants. Topics include transnationalism, diaspora, identity formation, integration and assimilation, citizenship claims, and the feminization of migration. Ethnographic readings focus primarily on migration to the US, but also include cases from other world areas, most notably Asia. This is a junior tutorial. 

 

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Women, Gender and Health: Critical Issues in Mental Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
This course explores issues relevant to mental illness, mental health from a gender perspective. Course themes include illness constructs, life cycle and transitions, collective and individual trauma, role and relationship and embodiment. Topics include eating disorders, pain, hormonally mediated mood disorders, and PTSD. Examples highlight US and international experience. Readings are multidisciplinary, including public health and medicine, social sciences, history and literature...
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