Peace, War, and Security

Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The U.S. comprises 5% of the world’s population but holds approximately 40% of the world’s guns. We also experience more gun-related deaths than any economically comparable nation. How did the nation become a “gun culture,” and whose rights and interests does widespread armament serve? Who is included in the Second Amendment’s appeal to “the right of the people to have and bear arms,” and how have notions of race, gender, class, and sexuality framed popular understandings of “good guys” and “good women” whose armed citizenship is required for the nation’s security?... Read more about Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

We often think of slavery as being a dark chapter in our past, but this is a tragic oversimplification. What defines slavery in the modern world, and what are the moral, political and social implications of its continued existence? As we explore its underpinnings, we discover that all of us may be in some way complicit in its survival.... Read more about Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

Women as Photographers in Weimar Germany and in Exile

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

An extraordinary number of women trained to become photographers in Weimar Germany (1919-1933). Their presence and practices dramatically altered the conditions of visual culture in a country that had never achieved the levels of French modernism, for example, neither in terms of its aesthetic complexity nor in terms of its contributions to nation state identity.... Read more about Women as Photographers in Weimar Germany and in Exile

Gender, War, Writing, Rhetoric, and Reading: Troilus and Criseyde from Late Medieval to Early Modern

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The material of this course consists of the following exceptionally rich late medieval and early modern Trojan materials: Chaucer’s House of Fame; Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde; Lydgate’s Troy Book (Book 2); Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid; and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida. We will be guided into these materials by the inter-related topics listed in the course title. Wherever possible and appropriate, we will absorb the publication conditions and media of these texts and/or performances.... Read more about Gender, War, Writing, Rhetoric, and Reading: Troilus and Criseyde from Late Medieval to Early Modern

Gender, Sex and War (Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar)

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020
The Gender and Public Policy Seminar has been designed to give students an opportunity to engage with leading-edge scholars and practitioners working to advance gender equality. Because the subject of 'gender and public policy' is too wide ranging and global to address within a single semester, we aim to focus the course each year on a 'spotlight' issue.... Read more about Gender, Sex and War (Gender and Public Policy (GAPP) Seminar)

Sex, Money, and Power in the Postcolonial World

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2020

With globalization, sex-everywhere-has become more central to who we are as citizens and consumers, how we gain rights and resources, and how we relate to others as members of a specific race, ethnicity, region, or culture. Worldwide, states invest or disinvest in people according to how they have sex, adopt gender identities, or sustain sexual morality.... Read more about Sex, Money, and Power in the Postcolonial World

Violence, Gender, and Global Politics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

In this course, we will consider the international dimensions of gender, sex and violence, largely within the context of war and conflict. Both academic scholarship and current policy debates are informed by powerful—and often unquestioned—assumptions about sex, gender and violence. Recent research has started to challenge some of these ideas, and policymakers are responding with calls for better data, increased attention to long-hidden problems, and new strategies to confront these difficult problems. In the course, we begin with a review of theoretical constructs, then turn to a series of policy relevant questions on the politics of sex, gender, and violence. Topics that we will cover include gendered causes and consequences of war (e.g., Does gender inequality cause conflict? Are women leaders more peaceful? What are the consequences of war for people of different genders?); gendered motivations for political violence; the regulation of sex and gender within armed groups, including the military, insurgencies and terrorist organizations; and wartime sexual violence. The course will include discussions of research design and implementation, as well as the implications of research on policy responses and interventions.

... Read more about Violence, Gender, and Global Politics

Solidarity: Transnational Women's Rights from Suffrage to NGOs

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2020

“Solidarity” takes an intersectional approach to the study of women’s and sexual rights in transnational perspective from the late nineteenth century until today. In this course, we will explore how American feminism, particularly through the fight for women’s suffrage, set the agenda for issues of equality and sexual rights around the world, often in complex and contradictory ways. Through a semester-long engagement with Schlesinger Library collections on transnational feminist and women of color feminisms, we will investigate feminist links to and critiques of the imperial project – from anti-trafficking campaigns in colonial and postcolonial India, to transnational feminist labor movements in the Philippines and Bangladesh, to the wars in Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq. Together, we will think about the complex relationship of feminism and war, the place of feminist thought in debates about incarceration and immigration, and the contradictory role of feminism in global movements for rights. 


... Read more about Solidarity: Transnational Women's Rights from Suffrage to NGOs