History

Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This course treats persecution in America as a site of public history and ethics. Focusing on three historical cases—the Salem Witch trials, the Underground Railroad, and Cold War-era McCarthyism—we will explore how hunts for witches, runaway slaves, and communists (along with their fellow travelers) have shaped American political culture.... Read more about Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This seminar will explore female rulership in Europe from the late Roman empire to the age of Elizabeth I. Discussion of varied texts and images (most of them primary sources in translation) will reveal the role of queens within their societies, their relationship to broader social and cultural institutions such as the Christian Church, and the ways in which queens were celebrated, criticized, and imagined by writers and artists of their time.... Read more about God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

Shakespeare's Women

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Rosalind, Portia, Ophelia, Juliet, Isabella, Cressida, Cleopatra, Cordelia, Imogen, Volumnia, Miranda, Lady Macbeth—the women of Shakespeare’s plays have become iconic figures, cited, admired, critiqued, and invoked in every generation. But in the English public theater of Shakespeare’s time no women were permitted to appear onstage.... Read more about Shakespeare's Women

Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021
In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

Women, Religion, and the Problem of Historical Agency

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This course examines recent scholarship on women in American religious history, focusing particularly on questions of narration, agency and power. We will ask several interrelated questions: How have historians integrated women into narratives of American religious history? Whose stories have they highlighted, and why? How have they conceptualized women as historical agents?... Read more about Women, Religion, and the Problem of Historical Agency

Sex, Gender, and Sexuality II

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The second of two parts, the course will continue to explore the theoretical articulation of sex, gender, and sexuality in feminist and queer theory, with attention to the role of other differences – racial, ethnic, religious, and differences in physical ability – in contemporary work. Prerequisite: REL 1572 or consent of the instructor.

... Read more about Sex, Gender, and Sexuality II

Tutorial - Sophomore Year

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

An introduction to foundational concepts and skills in the interdisciplinary study of gender and sexuality. Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Audre Lorde, Donna Haraway, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Judith Butler, Lorgia Garcia- Peña, Hortense Spillers, José Esteban Muñoz, Sara Ahmed, Alison Bechdel, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, and Michel Foucault.... Read more about Tutorial - Sophomore Year

Sounding Identity

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This interdisciplinary seminar addresses multiple histories of politics and aesthetics within the context of sound and music technologies as mediators of intersectional identity. Creative practice will serve as a method of critical inquiry into race, class, dis/ability, gender identity, and sexual orientation in concert, recordings, and other outputs.... Read more about Sounding Identity

Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The 1960s and 1970s witnessed dynamic movements of collective action in the United States and the world. This research seminar charts the key events, actors, ideas and strategies of these movements—from civil rights and black power to women’s rights and the conservative movement—and situates them within the central economic, social, and geopolitical developments of the post-World War II period.... Read more about Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

Pages