Film, Media, and Art

Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This course treats persecution in America as a site of public history and ethics. Focusing on three historical cases—the Salem Witch trials, the Underground Railroad, and Cold War-era McCarthyism—we will explore how hunts for witches, runaway slaves, and communists (along with their fellow travelers) have shaped American political culture.... Read more about Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

Media and Society

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

What are the virtuous capacities of mass-delivery information technologies? How do they help the world become a better place? Do they present potential threats to individuals and the societies in which they live? Through select theoretical work in sociology, we will reflect upon those questions and apply that knowledge to the world we know.... Read more about Media and Society

Shakespeare's Women

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Rosalind, Portia, Ophelia, Juliet, Isabella, Cressida, Cleopatra, Cordelia, Imogen, Volumnia, Miranda, Lady Macbeth—the women of Shakespeare’s plays have become iconic figures, cited, admired, critiqued, and invoked in every generation. But in the English public theater of Shakespeare’s time no women were permitted to appear onstage.... Read more about Shakespeare's Women

Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The femme fatale—the attractive, seductive woman who brings about the downfall of men—has fascinated us through the ages, from Biblical figures like Eve and Delilah, to historical women such as Cleopatra and Wallis Simpson, to the media personas of modern pop stars like Cardi B and Miley Cyrus. In the classic femme fatale narrative, the woman’s dangerous actions empower her, but she also must submit to the fact that her empowerment renders her a villain. Might this contradiction in the femme fatale’s character reflect tensions in our own evolving understanding of gender? How can the femme fatale character help us untangle the real-world gender problems that modern women and men face?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

 

“Reader, I married him.” As this famous line from Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre reminds us, writers have long been preoccupied with matters of the heart. Courtship plots are everywhere, from the novels of Jane Austen to the “rom-coms” of the 1980s and 1990s to essays you can find every Sunday in the “Styles” section of the New York Times. For centuries, marriage was primarily an economic relationship, and love outside of marriage ended in humiliation or even death. But what happens when society expands the options for living and loving?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

A La Francaise: French Feminisms Today

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Close readings of postwar French fiction and theory with emphasis on what is called "the feminine'' in key psychoanalytic, philosophical, and literary writings of the French poststructuralist tradition. In particular, we will focus on fifty years of dialogue between postwar theory in France and feminist practice in the United States. Writers considered include Cixous, Duras, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Wittig as well as Deleuze, Derrida, and Lacan....

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Queer (and Queering) Cinema

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This course seeks to map a history and to expand the boundaries of what is commonly thought of as queer cinema. We will explore LGBTQ films within a variety of frameworks, including but not limited to queer history, theory, and politics, and across a range of modes and genres, from classical Hollywood to the experimental underground.... Read more about Queer (and Queering) Cinema

Queer Fictions

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

 

 

A survey of modern and contemporary twentieth- and twenty-first-century queer French literature. We will begin first with an introduction to some canonical texts in queer theory (e.g. Sedgwick, Butler, Bersani, Warner) and proceed to the fictions (Genet, Guibert, Louis, Leduc, Wittig, Best, Garréta) to see the ways in which literature itself theorizes and does the work of deconstructing identity and desire.

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Narrative Nonfiction: Writing About Women and Sexual Politics Workshop

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This is a workshop class where students will learn the art of literary longform journalism and compose stories that take on questions of gender, feminism, sexuality and power, while simultaneously exploring how the media represents gender and learning the history of women in journalism. No profession has been as important to feminists in challenging society than journalism--even as journalism has been historically resistant to a...

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Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This seminar looks at the expanding range of genres, forms and strategies pursued by modern and contemporary authors who want to represent LGBTQ+- lives, communities, bodies and selves; poems and performances, novels and stories, YA (young adult) fiction and science fiction, memoirs and graphic novels, will all be  represented, along with a light frame of what's usually called queer theory and some points of comparison, or contrast, from earlier centuries. Bechdel, Audre Lorde, O'Hara, Whitman, Walden, and many others.... Read more about Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

Queer Fictions

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

A survey of modern and contemporary queer writing from twentieth- and twenty-first-century French literature. We will read writers such as Jean Genet, Hervé Guibert, Édouard Louis, Mireille Best, Violette Leduc, Monique Wittig, Anne Garréta.... Read more about Queer Fictions

A Voice of One's Own: Creative Writing in Women, Gender, and Sexuality

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

How does one balance the demands of "politics" with the subtleties of "artistry?"  In this course, we’ll write and analyze short stories, paying close attention to key writing concepts such as characterization, voice, point of view, dialogue, and setting, while also investigating thematic issues related to women, gender, and sexuality studies.... Read more about A Voice of One's Own: Creative Writing in Women, Gender, and Sexuality

Sounding Identity

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This interdisciplinary seminar addresses multiple histories of politics and aesthetics within the context of sound and music technologies as mediators of intersectional identity. Creative practice will serve as a method of critical inquiry into race, class, dis/ability, gender identity, and sexual orientation in concert, recordings, and other outputs.... Read more about Sounding Identity

Women as Photographers in Weimar Germany and in Exile

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

An extraordinary number of women trained to become photographers in Weimar Germany (1919-1933). Their presence and practices dramatically altered the conditions of visual culture in a country that had never achieved the levels of French modernism, for example, neither in terms of its aesthetic complexity nor in terms of its contributions to nation state identity.... Read more about Women as Photographers in Weimar Germany and in Exile

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