Fall 2022

Leadership from the Inside Out: The Capacity to Lead and Stay Alive-Self, Identity, and Freedom-with a Focus on Anti-Black Racism and Sexism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2023
Leadership can be exercised from many locations in a society–from authority positions and from the streets–yet in general, to lead is to live with danger. It often requires putting yourself on the line, disturbing the status quo, and working with conflict. Those who lead take risks and sometimes get silenced, marginalized, or killed. To lead through the dangers of change demands diagnostic integrity and skill. Many Kennedy School courses strengthen diagnostic skills by analyzing...
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Exercising Leadership: The Politics of Change

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

This course provides a diagnostic and strategic foundation for leadership practice.  Designed for professionals from diverse backgrounds and cultures, the course builds upon the extraordinary experience of many of our students. The purpose of the course is to increase one’s capacity to lead with and without authority, across boundaries, and from any political or organizational position. 

In a world in which most organizations, communities, and societies face enormous adaptive pressures, the practice of leadership is critical – the practice of mobilizing systems of...

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Civil Resistance: How It Works

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

Civil resistance is the application of unarmed civilian power using nonviolent methods such as protests, strikes, boycotts, demonstrations, without using or threatening physical harm against the opponent. The use of civil resistance has been increasing around the world in recent decades in places as diverse as Sudan, Algeria, Russia, Serbia, Spain, Egypt, Iran, Maldives, the Niger Delta, the West Bank, Thailand, Myanmar, and the United States, among others. Because civil resistance can have profound effects, it is essential to understand the causes, dynamics, outcomes, and...

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Social Demography Workshop

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

The Social Demography Workshop is a venue for graduate students and faculty to present research on a wide variety of topics such as family, gender, inequality, im/migration, fertility, mortality, and the institutional arrangements that shape and respond to population processes.

Additional Information:
Faculty: Alexandra Killewald, Mary...
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Leadership from Inside Out: Self, Identity, and Freedom - With a Focus on Anti-Black Racism and Sexism

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
Leadership can be exercised from many locations in a society–from authority positions and from the streets–yet in general, to lead is to live with danger. It often requires putting yourself on the line, disturbing the status quo, and working with conflict. Those who lead take risks and sometimes get silenced, marginalized, or killed.
 
...
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Queer/Medieval

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
The / in this course title can suggest a slippage or interchangeability; opposition and polarization; or erotic or romantic friction. This course functions as an introduction to queer theory as an intellectual tool with which to read texts far removed from the political, cultural, and social discourses from which queer theory emerged. We will ask: what can queer theory offer readers of medieval literature in its explorations of gender, sexuality, race, power, narrative, trauma, and...
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Questions of Theory

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

To explore key literary, cultural and critical theories, we pose questions through readings of classic and contemporary theorists, from Aristotle to Kant, Schiller, Arendt, Barthes, Foucault, Glissant, Ortiz, Kittler, and Butler, among others. Their approaches include aesthetics, (post)structuralism, (post)colonialism, media theory, gender theory, ecocriticism. Each seminar addresses a core reading and a cluster of variations. Weekly writing assignments will formulate a question that addresses the core texts to prepare for in-class discussions and interpretive activities. 

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Introduction to Sociology

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

What is society? What is the role of the individual in society? How does the way society is organized affect the behaviors and beliefs of people who live in it? How can we change our societies? This course introduces students to the field of sociology. By surveying social theory as well as empirical studies, students acquire what C. Wright Mills calls the "sociological imagination": the ability to think beyond our personal lives and to connect the experiences of individuals with large social structures. Readings include prominent empirical investigations into family dynamics, class...

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Anyone's Germany: Redefining Identity in Contemporary German Fiction

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
What does it mean to be German today? Contemporary German society abounds with Grenzüberschreiter of varying kinds: generations who were raised in a divided Germany but came of age in a reunified, globalized Bundesrepublik; communities of multi-generational German nationals whose identities nevertheless inherit the problematic international labor-politics of both the East and the West; voices demanding greater visibility of Germany’s postcolonial legacy and sparking viral debates...
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Comparative and International Legal Struggles Over Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

At the intersection of debates about religion, private morality and public policy, and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) are lightning rods of controversy in most societies. While the pandemic revealed the precariousness of some advances, a wave of ethno-nationalism and conservative populism has brought a sharp backlash against SRHR in many countries across the globe. Drawing on case examples from multiple regions, as well as in supra-national human rights forums, the reading group will critically explore: strategies used to assert legal claims relating to involuntary...

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Introduction to Feminist Science Studies

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
This seminar is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of feminist science studies. As the feminist movements of the 1970s began to change the American political landscape, academic feminists began inquiries into the marginalization of women in science – a debate philosopher Harding called “the woman question in science.” Feminist scientists began to examine sex, gender and race bias in their own disciplines. In consequence, they raised questions about androcentric – male-...
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African Architecture

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022

This course examines architecture in African in an array of contexts and historical periods. Emphasis will be given to the shaping of the built environment around core cultural, social, political and economic contexts. Questions of style, materials, design considerations, gender, class, religion, building genres, colonialism and globalization will be addressed. Students will gain a knowledge not only of key monuments and models of African architecture, but also of differential scholarly approaches to these striking traditions. 

 

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Love's Labors Found: Uncovering Histories of Emotional Labor

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2022
How do love, care, and desire influence the value of work, and why is emotional labor – which is vital to child or elder care, domestic labor, nursing, teaching, and sex work – often considered to be something other than work? How and why do the racial and gender identities of workers affect the economic, social, and emotional value of their labor? How do political and social arrangements of labor help produce and reinforce racial categories while solidifying the boundaries...
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