Classes

Equity and Opportunity: Identity in Context: Gender and Sexuality

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2021
Students in each Equity and Opportunity module will: (1) engage deeply with key concepts in equity, opportunity, inclusion, oppression, privilege, and power within the context of education; (2) connect and build meaningful relationships with others while recognizing the multiple intersecting identities, perspectives and developmental differences people hold; and (3) make progress in understanding and reflecting on their own experiences and actions across cultures and contexts.... Read more about Equity and Opportunity: Identity in Context: Gender and Sexuality

Friendship as Way of Life

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

 

This course will begin with Foucault’s essay, “Friendship as a Way of Life.” It will discuss the contemporary context of new engagements with and interests in friendship. We will then look at differing concepts and practices of friendship, and their work in shaping social sentiments and political affects in Euro-American context. Readings will include Plato, Montaigne, Bray, Marcus, Foucault, and Miller.... Read more about Friendship as Way of Life

Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The U.S. comprises 5% of the world’s population but holds approximately 40% of the world’s guns. We also experience more gun-related deaths than any economically comparable nation. How did the nation become a “gun culture,” and whose rights and interests does widespread armament serve? Who is included in the Second Amendment’s appeal to “the right of the people to have and bear arms,” and how have notions of race, gender, class, and sexuality framed popular understandings of “good guys” and “good women” whose armed citizenship is required for the nation’s security?... Read more about Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This course treats persecution in America as a site of public history and ethics. Focusing on three historical cases—the Salem Witch trials, the Underground Railroad, and Cold War-era McCarthyism—we will explore how hunts for witches, runaway slaves, and communists (along with their fellow travelers) have shaped American political culture.... Read more about Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

American Capitalism

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy into the powerhouse of the world economy, how Americans built a capitalist economy and how that capitalism, in turn, changed every aspect of their lives.... Read more about American Capitalism

Implicit Bias: Science and Society

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

The term implicit bias was coined in 1995 to capture the idea that bias, i.e., a deviation from truth or shared values can be implicit, i.e., occur without conscious awareness and/or conscious control. It belongs to an area of scientific psychology named implicit social cognition (ISC), dedicated to exploring the hidden aspects of the mental representation of social groups.... Read more about Implicit Bias: Science and Society

Media and Society

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

What are the virtuous capacities of mass-delivery information technologies? How do they help the world become a better place? Do they present potential threats to individuals and the societies in which they live? Through select theoretical work in sociology, we will reflect upon those questions and apply that knowledge to the world we know.... Read more about Media and Society

Inequality at Work: Contemporary Problems and Policy Solutions

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Work is at the core of daily life for most American adults. But the experience of work, of having a good job or a bad job, is starkly unequal and by many accounts work has become more precarious and more polarized over the past several decades. We begin with a broad overview of shifts in American society and the economy that are both backdrop and cause of these changes in work - the transformation of the American labor market by the forces of financialization and de-unionization, changes in American families in terms of family structure, women’s labor force participation, and care giving obligations, and retrenchment in the welfare state.... Read more about Inequality at Work: Contemporary Problems and Policy Solutions

Pandemic Inequalities: Human Rights and Global Health

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

 

COVID-19 has laid bare staggering inequalities within and between countries, as well as legitimacy crises that have been growing for decades in both democratic institutions and global governance. In this context, how should we understand the suffering we or others are experiencing, and the dramatically disparate health and social impacts of this novel coronavirus on diverse groups across our societies and the globe? And what legal, political and economic responses should we demand?... Read more about Pandemic Inequalities: Human Rights and Global Health

God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This seminar will explore female rulership in Europe from the late Roman empire to the age of Elizabeth I. Discussion of varied texts and images (most of them primary sources in translation) will reveal the role of queens within their societies, their relationship to broader social and cultural institutions such as the Christian Church, and the ways in which queens were celebrated, criticized, and imagined by writers and artists of their time.... Read more about God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

Ethics in Reproductive Medicine

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This course will be taught in seminar format; the instructor will facilitate discussion based on each week's readings. The students will be expected to prepare ahead of class and participate in interactive discussions of cases raised during lecture. The course will examine ethical issues that arise in reproductive medicine and women's health.... Read more about Ethics in Reproductive Medicine

Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

This seminar looks at the expanding range of genres, forms and strategies pursued by modern and contemporary authors who want to represent LGBTQ+- lives, communities, bodies and selves; poems and performances, novels and stories, YA (young adult) fiction and science fiction, memoirs and graphic novels, will all be represented, along with a light frame of what's usually called queer theory and some points of comparison, or contrast, from earlier centuries. Bechdel, Audre Lorde, O'Hara, Whitman, Walden, and many others.... Read more about Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

Shakespeare's Women

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2021

Rosalind, Portia, Ophelia, Juliet, Isabella, Cressida, Cleopatra, Cordelia, Imogen, Volumnia, Miranda, Lady Macbeth—the women of Shakespeare’s plays have become iconic figures, cited, admired, critiqued, and invoked in every generation. But in the English public theater of Shakespeare’s time no women were permitted to appear onstage.... Read more about Shakespeare's Women

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