Classes

    Expository Writing 20: Sexism and Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Today, the United States Congress is 19.4% female. That statistic trails the world average of 23.3%, with Nordic, European, sub-Saharan African, and Asian countries achieving better gender balance in national legislatures than the U.S. Some scholars contend that when women run, they are no more likely to win or lose compared to their male counterparts, though they are simply less likely to run in the first place. Other scholars identify a strong correlation between voting and sexist attitudes, notably in the 2016 U.S. election.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Sexism and Politics

    Shakespeare's Women

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Rosalind, Portia, Ophelia, Juliet, Isabella, Cressida, Cleopatra, Cordelia, Imogen, Volumnia, Miranda, Lady Macbeth—the women of Shakespeare’s plays have become iconic figures, cited, admired, critiqued, and invoked in every generation. But in the English public theater of Shakespeare’s time no women were permitted to appear onstage.... Read more about Shakespeare's Women

    Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This seminar looks at the expanding range of genres, forms and strategies pursued by modern and contemporary authors who want to represent LGBTQ+- lives, communities, bodies and selves; poems and performances, novels and stories, YA (young adult) fiction and science fiction, memoirs and graphic novels, will all be represented, along with a light frame of what's usually called queer theory and some points of comparison, or contrast, from earlier centuries. Bechdel, Audre Lorde, O'Hara, Whitman, Walden, and many others.... Read more about Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This seminar will explore female rulership in Europe from the late Roman empire to the age of Elizabeth I. Discussion of varied texts and images (most of them primary sources in translation) will reveal the role of queens within their societies, their relationship to broader social and cultural institutions such as the Christian Church, and the ways in which queens were celebrated, criticized, and imagined by writers and artists of their time.... Read more about God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

    Media and Society

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    What are the virtuous capacities of mass-delivery information technologies? How do they help the world become a better place? Do they present potential threats to individuals and the societies in which they live? Through select theoretical work in sociology, we will reflect upon those questions and apply that knowledge to the world we know.... Read more about Media and Society

    Implicit Bias: Science and Society

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The term implicit bias was coined in 1995 to capture the idea that bias, i.e., a deviation from truth or shared values can be implicit, i.e., occur without conscious awareness and/or conscious control. It belongs to an area of scientific psychology named implicit social cognition (ISC), dedicated to exploring the hidden aspects of the mental representation of social groups.... Read more about Implicit Bias: Science and Society

    American Capitalism

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    How did capitalism emerge, expand and transform daily life in North America over the past 500 years? In this course, students will gain an in-depth understanding of how North America turned from a minor outpost of the Atlantic economy into the powerhouse of the world economy, how Americans built a capitalist economy and how that capitalism, in turn, changed every aspect of their lives.... Read more about American Capitalism

    Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The U.S. comprises 5% of the world’s population but holds approximately 40% of the world’s guns. We also experience more gun-related deaths than any economically comparable nation. How did the nation become a “gun culture,” and whose rights and interests does widespread armament serve? Who is included in the Second Amendment’s appeal to “the right of the people to have and bear arms,” and how have notions of race, gender, class, and sexuality framed popular understandings of “good guys” and “good women” whose armed citizenship is required for the nation’s security?... Read more about Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

    Friendship as Way of Life

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    This course will begin with Foucault’s essay, “Friendship as a Way of Life.” It will discuss the contemporary context of new engagements with and interests in friendship. We will then look at differing concepts and practices of friendship, and their work in shaping social sentiments and political affects in Euro-American context. Readings will include Plato, Montaigne, Bray, Marcus, Foucault, and Miller.... Read more about Friendship as Way of Life

Pages