Classes

    Video Game Storytelling

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Although this course touches on blockbuster games—“ludo-narrative dissonance” and India’s role in Uncharted: The Lost Legacy; racism, satire, and the white-saviour narrative in the Far Cry franchise; Ayn Rand, US history and the illusion of gamer choice in Bioshock—it’s primarily concerned with indie titles which explore alternative forms of storytelling. More specifically, it’s about games pilloried—rather as free verse poetry is bashed as “just chopped up prose”—as mere “walking...
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    Psychotherapy and the Modern Self

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    What does psychotherapy offer our distressed selves that friends, family, self-help, and psychopharmacological remedies do not? The demand for therapy is currently at an all-time high, bolstering its century-long dominance as the preferred antidote to human unhappiness and misery, even as it is under sustained attack from critics characterizing it as self-indulgent as well as from platforms that would replace human therapists with chatbots and analysts with algorithms. This course...
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    Suburban Wars: The American Suburb in the Twentieth Century

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    For as long as suburbs have existed, they have been battlefields—sites of contestation where Americans have fought over their social significance, their place in the political economy of urban areas, and their role in the nation’s identity. This undergraduate seminar explores questions about the meaning of suburbs, their relationship with cities, and the ways that suburbs have intersected with the histories of race, class, gender, capitalism, architecture, political ideology, and...
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    History of Modern Latin America

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course surveys Latin America from its 19th-century independence movements through the present day. How did the powerful legacies of European colonialism, and the neocolonial economic order that emerged to replace it, shape the Americas' new nations? Themes include nationalism and identity, revolution and counterrevolution, populism, state formation, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social movements, the role of foreign powers, inequality and social class, dictatorship, democratization, and human rights. 

     

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    Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    We coined the term implicit bias in 1995 to capture the idea that bias, i.e., a deviation from accuracy or values can be implicit, i.e., operate without conscious awareness or conscious control. The idea emerged from basic research on implicit social cognition (ISC), an area of scientific psychology that explores the hidden aspects of mental representations of self, other, and social groups. Today, 25 years later, the term implicit bias has transcended academic psychology and...
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    Understanding Who We Are: Development of the Self

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    Who are you? And what has made you who you are? This course will examine classic and current theories and research in the development of self-concept, including our identity (e.g., gender, sexual, and social), self-esteem (e.g., body image, popularity, and sense of belonging) and personality. By exploring major developmental milestones and social-cognitive factors related to the development of a self, we will aim to understand how various forces contribute to our self-concept, and how our self-concept intersects with how we understand and navigate the world. 

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    Law and American Society

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    At a time when the rule of law is imperiled, our democracy and equal rights of every kind under assault by multiple forces, the importance of understanding our constitutional system of rights and laws as essential to the fabric of the nation cannot be overstated. The course will examine law as a vehicle of political conflict and a defining force in American society in four dimensions: 1.) as it establishes individual rights, liberties, and the limits of toleration; 2.) as it attempts to resolve differences among competing constituencies; 3.) as it sets out terms of punishment and social...
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    Critical Theory of Knowledge, Technology and Power

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This tutorial explores the role and impact of science and technology on society, culture and politics from the perspective of critical theory. Building on the foundations of 20th-century critical theory by thinkers such as Benjamin, Heidegger and Foucault, the course provides an intellectual bridge to recent theoretic contributions in the field of science and technology studies (STS). Questions we’ll address along the way include: how do science and technology shape our experience...
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    Social Stratification: Seminar

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course examines the dimensions and magnitude of inequality in industrial societies, with a heavy emphasis on the United States since the mid-20th century. The readings and class discussion are designed to expose students to a broad range of influential pieces in the social stratification literature. In particular, we will study inequality through: pay for work, race, neighborhoods, gender, family, mobility, education, social capital, and rising income inequality since 1980. 

     

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    Social Demography Workshop

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    The Social Demography Workshop is a venue for graduate students and faculty to present research on a wide variety of topics such as family, gender, inequality, im/migration, fertility, mortality, and the institutional arrangements that shape and respond to population processes. 

     

    Additional Information:
    ...
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    Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Junior Year Tutorial: Research and Methods

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    In Junior Tutorial, students develop key research and writing skills necessary to write a junior research paper. We will read a range of texts that engage diverse methods in the fields of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies. Together, we will learn about methods and questions that form feminist engagements with archival research, literary and cultural studies, ethnography, quantitative and survey-based social science, and the sciences. Students will learn and engage with key...
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    Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Sophomore Year Tutorial

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    An introduction to foundational concepts and skills in the interdisciplinary study of gender and sexuality. Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Audre Lorde, Donna Haraway, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Judith Butler, Lorgia Garcia- Peña, Hortense Spillers, José Esteban Muñoz, Sara Ahmed, Alison Bechdel, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, and Michel Foucault.
     
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    Hindu Queenship

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course looks at the rich and complex traditions surrounding queenship in South Asia (the cultural area we will call jambudvīpa). We will look at the ways that queens have appeared in literature, inscriptions, and historical narratives, and at the ways the idea of queenship intersects with the categories of woman, wife, sovereign, and goddess. We will look at three millennia of queens, asking how South Asian queens have been thought about and written about, and how that changed over time. We will primarily look at Hindu traditions of queenship, but also engage Buddhist, Jain, and...

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    Living in an Urban Planet

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    It has become a cliché to say that more than half of the world’s population now lives in cities. The speed and scale of urbanization over the past century has been stunning, and we tend to underestimate the extent to which built environments and natural landscapes have become entangled. As both lived and imagined spaces, cities will continue to shape life on our planet. In fact, if we consider the flow of resources (and refuse), energy systems, the circulation of people and...
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    Social Demography Workshop

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    The Social Demography Workshop is a venue for graduate students and faculty to present research on a wide variety of topics such as family, gender, inequality, im/migration, fertility, mortality, and the institutional arrangements that shape and respond to population processes.

    Additional Information:
    Faculty: Alexandra Killewald, Mary...
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