Classes

    Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This is a graduate-level seminar focused on the descriptive representation of groups in politics, and the consequences of representation for substantive policy outcomes. Topics include the representation of women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, religious groups, geographic regions, class interests, and other social divisions, and how to understand the sources of variation in representation across time and institutional contexts.... Read more about Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The 1960s and 1970s witnessed dynamic movements of collective action in the United States and the world. This research seminar charts the key events, actors, ideas and strategies of these movements—from civil rights and black power to women’s rights and the conservative movement—and situates them within the central economic, social, and geopolitical developments of the post-World War II period.... Read more about Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Psychology of Women

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    How does being a woman affect our behavior, our evaluations of ourselves, and our interactions with others? This course examines psychological science on women and girls in western industrialized societies, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, girlhood, women and work, relationships, pregnancy and motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and women in later adulthood.... Read more about Psychology of Women

    Topics in Advanced Performance Theory: Gender and Sexuality

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this seminar, we will listen to and participate in current conversations in Performance Theory about gender and sexuality, especially as both these categories intersect with race. Topics include coloniality, intimacy, pleasure, antisociality, affect, and utopia. Reading includes works by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, E. Patrick Johnson, José Esteban Muñoz, Amber Jamilla Musser, and Joshua Chambers-Letson. This is an advanced course intended for graduate students and upper-level undergraduates.... Read more about Topics in Advanced Performance Theory: Gender and Sexuality

    Women in US Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course examines the causes and consequences of gender inequality in politics, the workforce, and the household. We will draw on theory and literature from political science and other disciplines to learn about cutting edge research in the field, focusing on the United States (with some application to other advanced democracies).... Read more about Women in US Politics

    Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    We often think of slavery as being a dark chapter in our past, but this is a tragic oversimplification. What defines slavery in the modern world, and what are the moral, political and social implications of its continued existence? As we explore its underpinnings, we discover that all of us may be in some way complicit in its survival.... Read more about Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

    Narrative Nonfiction: Writing About Women and Sexual Politics Workshop

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This is a workshop class where students will learn the art of literary longform journalism and compose stories that take on questions of gender, feminism, sexuality and power, while simultaneously exploring how the media represents gender and learning the history of women in journalism. No profession has been as important to feminists in challenging society than journalism--even as journalism has been historically resistant to a...

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    Against Difference: Monique Wittig's Trojan Horse Writing and Theory

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    French feminism, as it is studied and taught in the Anglo-American academy, is most often associated with the three names that constitute the “Holy Trinity” of Hélène Cixous, Luce Irigaray, and Julia Kristeva—thinkers whose various theorizations of sexual difference permitted the convergence of an emergent feminist literary criticism with high theory and all its cachet.... Read more about Against Difference: Monique Wittig's Trojan Horse Writing and Theory

    Queer Fictions

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

     

    A survey of modern and contemporary twentieth- and twenty-first-century queer French literature. We will begin first with an introduction to some canonical texts in queer theory (e.g. Sedgwick, Butler, Bersani, Warner) and proceed to the fictions (Genet, Guibert, Louis, Leduc, Wittig, Best, Garréta) to see the ways in which literature itself theorizes and does the work of deconstructing identity and desire.

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    Queer (and Queering) Cinema

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course seeks to map a history and to expand the boundaries of what is commonly thought of as queer cinema. We will explore LGBTQ films within a variety of frameworks, including but not limited to queer history, theory, and politics, and across a range of modes and genres, from classical Hollywood to the experimental underground.... Read more about Queer (and Queering) Cinema

    Introduction to Latinx Studies

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this survey course we will problematize the project of Latinidad — tracing its contours as they have been shaped by historical systems and processes of power such as racialization, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and nation. Following a comparative and critical Ethnic Studies approach, students will gain historical and transdisciplinary perspectives towards the possibilities and limitations of Latinx identity and discourse.... Read more about Introduction to Latinx Studies

    A La Francaise: French Feminisms Today

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Close readings of postwar French fiction and theory with emphasis on what is called "the feminine'' in key psychoanalytic, philosophical, and literary writings of the French poststructuralist tradition. In particular, we will focus on fifty years of dialogue between postwar theory in France and feminist practice in the United States. Writers considered include Cixous, Duras, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Wittig as well as Deleuze, Derrida, and Lacan....

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    Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In a powerful essay, the late writer and activist Audre Lorde suggested, “Where the words of women are crying to be heard we must each of us recognize our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them and examine them in their pertinence to our lives.” Lorde is not alone in asking us to pay attention to and take responsibility for women’s stories; for centuries scholars and activists alike have championed the words of women, including women of color and queer women, whose stories have routinely gone untold or unheard.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    “Reader, I married him.” As this famous line from Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre reminds us, writers have long been preoccupied with matters of the heart. Courtship plots are everywhere, from the novels of Jane Austen to the “rom-coms” of the 1980s and 1990s to essays you can find every Sunday in the “Styles” section of the New York Times. For centuries, marriage was primarily an economic relationship, and love outside of marriage ended in humiliation or even death. But what happens when society expands the options for living and loving?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

    Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The femme fatale—the attractive, seductive woman who brings about the downfall of men—has fascinated us through the ages, from Biblical figures like Eve and Delilah, to historical women such as Cleopatra and Wallis Simpson, to the media personas of modern pop stars like Cardi B and Miley Cyrus. In the classic femme fatale narrative, the woman’s dangerous actions empower her, but she also must submit to the fact that her empowerment renders her a villain. Might this contradiction in the femme fatale’s character reflect tensions in our own evolving understanding of gender? How can the femme fatale character help us untangle the real-world gender problems that modern women and men face?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

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