Classes

    Tutorial - Sophomore Year

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    An introduction to foundational concepts and skills in the interdisciplinary study of gender and sexuality. Readings include Gloria Anzaldúa, Audre Lorde, Donna Haraway, Patricia Hill Collins, Kimberlé Crenshaw, Judith Butler, Lorgia Garcia- Peña, Hortense Spillers, José Esteban Muñoz, Sara Ahmed, Alison Bechdel, Chandra Talpade Mohanty, and Michel Foucault.... Read more about Tutorial - Sophomore Year

    Psychology of Close Relationships

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course is an in-depth exploration of close relationships. Examples of topics to be covered include the biological bases of attraction; relationship formation; the end of relationships through break-up, divorce, or death; relationship satisfaction; deception; gender roles; same-sex relationships; loneliness; relationships and well-being; and public perceptions about relationships.... Read more about Psychology of Close Relationships

    Sex, Gender, and Sexuality II

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The second of two parts, the course will continue to explore the theoretical articulation of sex, gender, and sexuality in feminist and queer theory, with attention to the role of other differences – racial, ethnic, religious, and differences in physical ability – in contemporary work. Prerequisite: REL 1572 or consent of the instructor.

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    Women, Religion, and the Problem of Historical Agency

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course examines recent scholarship on women in American religious history, focusing particularly on questions of narration, agency and power. We will ask several interrelated questions: How have historians integrated women into narratives of American religious history? Whose stories have they highlighted, and why? How have they conceptualized women as historical agents?... Read more about Women, Religion, and the Problem of Historical Agency

    Roman Catholic Christianity and Contemporary Crises

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In the face of political and social change, and demands for racial, gender and economic justice, religious traditions struggle to respond while maintaining identity.  As an example, the Second Vatican Council of the early 1960s brought the Roman Catholic Church to a deeper engagement with modern academic scholarship such as historical critical methods of interpreting texts, environmental and evolutionary sciences’ relation to the Church, and the fundamental importance of modern philosophical and political thought to the institution’s self-understanding.... Read more about Roman Catholic Christianity and Contemporary Crises

    Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course investigates the realities of poverty through an intersectional lens, meaning that we will consider the simultaneous impact of race, gender, sexuality (and other identities) on economic insecurity. In what ways are conversations about poverty and its causes infused with assumptions and stereotypes related to gender, race, and sexuality?... Read more about Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Love's Labors Found: Uncovering Histories of Emotional Labor

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    How do love, care, and desire influence the value of work, and why is emotional labor – which is vital to child or elder care, domestic labor, nursing, teaching, and sex work – often considered to be something other than work? How and why do the racial and gender identities of workers affect the economic, social, and emotional value of their labor?... Read more about Love's Labors Found: Uncovering Histories of Emotional Labor

    Queer Fictions

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    A survey of modern and contemporary queer writing from twentieth- and twenty-first-century French literature. We will read writers such as Jean Genet, Hervé Guibert, Édouard Louis, Mireille Best, Violette Leduc, Monique Wittig, Anne Garréta.... Read more about Queer Fictions

    Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This seminar looks at the expanding range of genres, forms and strategies pursued by modern and contemporary authors who want to represent LGBTQ+- lives, communities, bodies and selves; poems and performances, novels and stories, YA (young adult) fiction and science fiction, memoirs and graphic novels, will all be  represented, along with a light frame of what's usually called queer theory and some points of comparison, or contrast, from earlier centuries. Bechdel, Audre Lorde, O'Hara, Whitman, Walden, and many others.... Read more about Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    Primate Social Behavior

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    A review of the behavioral interactions in natural primate populations, drawing on experimental, observational, and theoretical studies. Discussion of ecological, physiological, and developmental bases of primate social behavior, with special attention to the evolution of patterns of behavioral interactions among individuals of different age, sex, relatedness, and status.... Read more about Primate Social Behavior

    Feminist Political Thought

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    What is feminism? What is patriarchy? What and who is a woman?  How does gender relate to sexuality, and to class and race?  Should housework be waged, should sex be for sale, and should feminists trust the state?  This course is an introduction to feminist political thought since the mid-twentieth century. It explores the key arguments that have preoccupied radical, socialist and liberal feminists, and how debates about equality, work, and identity matter today.

     

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    "The Words to Say It": 20th-century Women Writing in French, From Colette to Satrapi

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020
    Motherhood, romantic love, independence, sexuality, citizenship, fantasy, death: these are just some of the themes explored in women's novels, written in French, during the twentieth century. Students will read four exemplary novels, exploring how they have finally become classics, even given what they say about life and what it means for women to write about it.... Read more about "The Words to Say It": 20th-century Women Writing in French, From Colette to Satrapi

    Feminism and Anthropology

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course considers the relationship between feminism (as activist realm, as theoretical field, in its institutionalized form as gender studies) and anthropology. We will begin with early ethnographic writing by women and about women, and analyze some of the interventions feminists hope to make in anthropology.... Read more about Feminism and Anthropology

    Gender, War, Writing, Rhetoric, and Reading: Troilus and Criseyde from Late Medieval to Early Modern

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The material of this course consists of the following exceptionally rich late medieval and early modern Trojan materials: Chaucer’s House of Fame; Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde; Lydgate’s Troy Book (Book 2); Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid; and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida. We will be guided into these materials by the inter-related topics listed in the course title. Wherever possible and appropriate, we will absorb the publication conditions and media of these texts and/or performances.... Read more about Gender, War, Writing, Rhetoric, and Reading: Troilus and Criseyde from Late Medieval to Early Modern

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