Classes

    Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This is a graduate-level seminar focused on the descriptive representation of groups in politics, and the consequences of representation for substantive policy outcomes. Topics include the representation of women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, religious groups, geographic regions, class interests, and other social divisions, and how to understand the sources of variation in representation across time and institutional contexts.... Read more about Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The 1960s and 1970s witnessed dynamic movements of collective action in the United States and the world. This research seminar charts the key events, actors, ideas and strategies of these movements—from civil rights and black power to women’s rights and the conservative movement—and situates them within the central economic, social, and geopolitical developments of the post-World War II period.... Read more about Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    21st Century Global Feminisms

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    If girls “run the world”, why is gender equality so hard to achieve? It has been 100 years since women gained voting rights in the US and many European countries, 70 years since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and China’s state policy of gender equality, 50 years since the transnational Women’s Liberation movement, and 25 years since the UN Beijing Declaration.... Read more about 21st Century Global Feminisms

    Women in US Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course examines the causes and consequences of gender inequality in politics, the workforce, and the household. We will draw on theory and literature from political science and other disciplines to learn about cutting edge research in the field, focusing on the United States (with some application to other advanced democracies).... Read more about Women in US Politics

    Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    We often think of slavery as being a dark chapter in our past, but this is a tragic oversimplification. What defines slavery in the modern world, and what are the moral, political and social implications of its continued existence? As we explore its underpinnings, we discover that all of us may be in some way complicit in its survival.... Read more about Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

    Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Bioethics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In its attention to gender, race, and sexuality, this course challenges and expands contemporary bioethical theory and practice. Drawing from philosophy, theology, law, medicine, public health, and the social and biological sciences, this interdisciplinary field is both critical and constructive in addressing bioethical theory, method, and substantive ethical concerns across the clinical, research, organizational, public policy, and global spheres.... Read more about Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Bioethics

    Hidden Figures: The City, Architecture and the Construction of Race and Gender

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    What hidden figures do our buildings and urban environment conceal? There exists systematic erasure of the contributions of Women of Color - Queer, Black and Indigenous -in the design field. This course is experimental by nature; it attempts to dismantle White-Supremacy ideology and the Western canon by not focusing on European, White and European American figures.... Read more about Hidden Figures: The City, Architecture and the Construction of Race and Gender

    Introduction to Latinx Studies

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this survey course we will problematize the project of Latinidad — tracing its contours as they have been shaped by historical systems and processes of power such as racialization, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and nation. Following a comparative and critical Ethnic Studies approach, students will gain historical and transdisciplinary perspectives towards the possibilities and limitations of Latinx identity and discourse.... Read more about Introduction to Latinx Studies

    Feminist Utopias

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this reading group on Feminist Utopias, we explore literature, essays and history of women’s law reform movements through time. What difference will feminist governance make in society? Is it most effective to reform the current system or to imagine and then build an alternative one? Students will have the opportunity to develop their own concepts for utopian ideals in a sex-equal society....

    Read more about Feminist Utopias

    Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In a powerful essay, the late writer and activist Audre Lorde suggested, “Where the words of women are crying to be heard we must each of us recognize our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them and examine them in their pertinence to our lives.” Lorde is not alone in asking us to pay attention to and take responsibility for women’s stories; for centuries scholars and activists alike have championed the words of women, including women of color and queer women, whose stories have routinely gone untold or unheard.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

    Expository Writing 20: Sexism and Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Today, the United States Congress is 19.4% female. That statistic trails the world average of 23.3%, with Nordic, European, sub-Saharan African, and Asian countries achieving better gender balance in national legislatures than the U.S. Some scholars contend that when women run, they are no more likely to win or lose compared to their male counterparts, though they are simply less likely to run in the first place. Other scholars identify a strong correlation between voting and sexist attitudes, notably in the 2016 U.S. election.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Sexism and Politics

    Pandemic Inequalities: Human Rights and Global Health

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    COVID-19 has laid bare staggering inequalities within and between countries, as well as legitimacy crises that have been growing for decades in both democratic institutions and global governance. In this context, how should we understand the suffering we or others are experiencing, and the dramatically disparate health and social impacts of this novel coronavirus on diverse groups across our societies and the globe? And what legal, political and economic responses should we demand?... Read more about Pandemic Inequalities: Human Rights and Global Health

    Inequality at Work: Contemporary Problems and Policy Solutions

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Work is at the core of daily life for most American adults. But the experience of work, of having a good job or a bad job, is starkly unequal and by many accounts work has become more precarious and more polarized over the past several decades. We begin with a broad overview of shifts in American society and the economy that are both backdrop and cause of these changes in work - the transformation of the American labor market by the forces of financialization and de-unionization, changes in American families in terms of family structure, women’s labor force participation, and care giving obligations, and retrenchment in the welfare state.... Read more about Inequality at Work: Contemporary Problems and Policy Solutions

    Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The U.S. comprises 5% of the world’s population but holds approximately 40% of the world’s guns. We also experience more gun-related deaths than any economically comparable nation. How did the nation become a “gun culture,” and whose rights and interests does widespread armament serve? Who is included in the Second Amendment’s appeal to “the right of the people to have and bear arms,” and how have notions of race, gender, class, and sexuality framed popular understandings of “good guys” and “good women” whose armed citizenship is required for the nation’s security?... Read more about Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

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