Classes

    Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In a powerful essay, the late writer and activist Audre Lorde suggested, “Where the words of women are crying to be heard we must each of us recognize our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them and examine them in their pertinence to our lives.” Lorde is not alone in asking us to pay attention to and take responsibility for women’s stories; for centuries scholars and activists alike have championed the words of women, including women of color and queer women, whose stories have routinely gone untold or unheard.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Modern Women’s Writing and Religion

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course explores relationships between 19th- and 20th-century women’s movements and religion by considering spiritual and religious practices in fiction, poetry, and essays by writers including Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, and Zora Neale Hurston, alongside essays by critics such as Saba Mahmood and theologians such as Katie G. Cannon.

    ... Read more about Modern Women’s Writing and Religion

    Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    “Reader, I married him.” As this famous line from Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre reminds us, writers have long been preoccupied with matters of the heart. Courtship plots are everywhere, from the novels of Jane Austen to the “rom-coms” of the 1980s and 1990s to essays you can find every Sunday in the “Styles” section of the New York Times. For centuries, marriage was primarily an economic relationship, and love outside of marriage ended in humiliation or even death. But what happens when society expands the options for living and loving?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

    Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The femme fatale—the attractive, seductive woman who brings about the downfall of men—has fascinated us through the ages, from Biblical figures like Eve and Delilah, to historical women such as Cleopatra and Wallis Simpson, to the media personas of modern pop stars like Cardi B and Miley Cyrus. In the classic femme fatale narrative, the woman’s dangerous actions empower her, but she also must submit to the fact that her empowerment renders her a villain. Might this contradiction in the femme fatale’s character reflect tensions in our own evolving understanding of gender? How can the femme fatale character help us untangle the real-world gender problems that modern women and men face?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

    Shakespeare's Women

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Rosalind, Portia, Ophelia, Juliet, Isabella, Cressida, Cleopatra, Cordelia, Imogen, Volumnia, Miranda, Lady Macbeth—the women of Shakespeare’s plays have become iconic figures, cited, admired, critiqued, and invoked in every generation. But in the English public theater of Shakespeare’s time no women were permitted to appear onstage.... Read more about Shakespeare's Women

    Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This seminar looks at the expanding range of genres, forms and strategies pursued by modern and contemporary authors who want to represent LGBTQ+- lives, communities, bodies and selves; poems and performances, novels and stories, YA (young adult) fiction and science fiction, memoirs and graphic novels, will all be represented, along with a light frame of what's usually called queer theory and some points of comparison, or contrast, from earlier centuries. Bechdel, Audre Lorde, O'Hara, Whitman, Walden, and many others.... Read more about Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This seminar will explore female rulership in Europe from the late Roman empire to the age of Elizabeth I. Discussion of varied texts and images (most of them primary sources in translation) will reveal the role of queens within their societies, their relationship to broader social and cultural institutions such as the Christian Church, and the ways in which queens were celebrated, criticized, and imagined by writers and artists of their time.... Read more about God Save the Queen! Ruling Women from Rome to the Renaissance

    Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course treats persecution in America as a site of public history and ethics. Focusing on three historical cases—the Salem Witch trials, the Underground Railroad, and Cold War-era McCarthyism—we will explore how hunts for witches, runaway slaves, and communists (along with their fellow travelers) have shaped American political culture.... Read more about Witch Hunts: Persecution in Public History and Ethics

    Friendship as Way of Life

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    This course will begin with Foucault’s essay, “Friendship as a Way of Life.” It will discuss the contemporary context of new engagements with and interests in friendship. We will then look at differing concepts and practices of friendship, and their work in shaping social sentiments and political affects in Euro-American context. Readings will include Plato, Montaigne, Bray, Marcus, Foucault, and Miller.... Read more about Friendship as Way of Life

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