Classes

    Psychology of Close Relationships

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course is an in-depth exploration of close relationships. Examples of topics to be covered include the biological bases of attraction; relationship formation; the end of relationships through break-up, divorce, or death; relationship satisfaction; deception; gender roles; same-sex relationships; loneliness; relationships and well-being; and public perceptions about relationships. You will have an opportunity to explore these topics primarily through critical examination of the empirical literature as well as through popular press. 

     

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    Psychology of Women

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    How does being a woman affect our behavior, our evaluations of ourselves, and our interactions with others? This course examines psychological science on women and girls in western industrialized societies, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, girlhood, women and work, relationships, pregnancy and motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and women in later adulthood. We will consider these topics through an understanding of gender as a social construction, being...
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    Sex, Gender, Sexuality

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Male/Female, Man/Woman, Masculine/Feminine, Straight/Gay. Where do these consequential categories come from? How do they generate inequalities? Why are they so easily reproduced? And what, if anything, should we do about it? Combining real-world applications with academic analyses, this course encourages you to think about how sexuality and gender have shaped the social world, as well as our own place within it.
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    Latinx, 1492 to 2022

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    The 530 years since Columbus’s arrival in Hispaniola have paid witness to the fall and rise of empires, the perseverance of colonial structures of power, and the construction and (re)creation of racial, sexual, and gendered identities. In the midst of such change and continuity, this course sets out to ask: what place does Latinx occupy in this long history? What does Latinidad look like when we trace it back 530 years, when we take 1492 to be its starting point instead of the 20th...
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    Feminism and Anthropology

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course considers the relationship between feminism (as activist realm, as theoretical field, in its institutionalized form as gender studies) and anthropology. We will begin with early ethnographic writing by women and about women, and analyze some of the interventions feminists hope to make in anthropology. We will then examine the relationship between feminism and anthropology through two topics: kinship and politics. Our course will consider how feminist anthropologists...
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    Women's Voices in Asian and Asian American Literature

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course introduces students to the writings of both canonical and lesser-known Asian and Asian American women writers. The course especially examines the works by Chinese/ Chinese American, Japanese/ Japanese American, Korean/ Korean American women writers. Moving from the pre-modern to contemporary era, the course will explore a range of women’s voices and experiences as reflected through poetry, fiction, diaries, and epistles. Authors will include Murasaki Shikibu, Li...
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    Staging Critique: French Theater and the Social Body

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    How has theater in France, from the 17th-century to the present, served as a site of political, social, and philosophical reflection? In this course, we will attempt to answer that question by studying a selection of plays representing the major trends, movements, and writers of French theater from Jean Racine to Marie NDiaye. We will look in particular at how theater privileges the body and the language of emotion to reformulate and respond to questions regarding the relationship...
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    Introduction to the Study of East Asia: Issues and Methods

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This interdisciplinary and team-taught course provides an introduction to several of the approaches and methods through which the societies and cultures of East Asia can be studied at Harvard, including history, philosophy, literary studies, political science, film studies, anthropology and gender studies. We consider both commonalities and differences across the region, and explore how larger processes of imperialism, modernization, and globalization have shaped contemporary East Asian societies and their future trajectories. 

     

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    Prison Abolition

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Is prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will...
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    Carceral Empire

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Mass incarceration is a catastrophe in the United States, especially affecting Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and poor communities. Different forms of carceral confinements have long been an integral part of the formation of the United States and other settler colonies in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on the history of Indigenous confinements. While the incarceration of Indigenous peoples today resembles the incarceration of other minoritized peoples, it has similar and...
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    Freedom: A Transatlantic Affair

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    The brilliantly witty German physicist and satirical author Georg Christoph Lichtenberg once remarked that “The American who first discovered Columbus made a horrible discovery” (“Der Amerikaner, der den Kolumbus zuerst entdeckte, machte eine böse Entdeckung.”). Taking inspiration from the insightfully eccentric perspectives that another culture might have on our own (and our own on it), this course interrogates the dynamics of transnational cultural transfer by examining case...
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    Introduction to African American Studies

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course aims to provide an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array of African-American cultural and political practices from slavery to the present. The course will involve close readings of a variety of primary sources and classic texts that present key issues in African American thought and practice. The course will place special emphasis on debates concerning African American people with the goal of introducing students to the process and the methodology of...
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    Literature, Diaspora, Migration, and Trauma

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course examines a diverse range of creative and critical discourses on trauma and the global African; East, South, Southeast, and West Asian (Chinese, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese); and Middle Eastern (Jewish, Palestinian, Lebanese); as well as Latin American diasporas. We focus on the connections among diasporas, displacement, migration, and trauma, and on the relationships of these phenomena and constructions and understandings of artistic and cultural identities, ethnicity/race...

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    Migration in Theory and Practice

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    In this course, we will examine how and why people migrate from one location to another, focusing both on the theoretical paradigms scholars use to explain migration processes as well as on the individual experiences of migrants. Topics include transnationalism, diaspora, identity formation, integration and assimilation, citizenship claims, and the feminization of migration. Ethnographic readings focus primarily on migration to the US, but also include cases from other world areas, most notably Asia. This is a junior tutorial. 

     

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    Mobility, Power and Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course incorporates insights from the new mobilities paradigm in studying the linkages between movement, power and politics in the contemporary era. The course will discuss how issues of mobility are central to many lives and many organizations, and how movement intersects with the spatialization and materialization of power, difference and inequality within societies. Students will come to an understanding of how mobility, and control over mobility, both reflects and...
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    The Dark Side of Big Data

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Does it sometimes feel like Instagram ads are listening a little too closely to your conversations? Have you ever wondered if certain corporations might own images of your face? Today, fears abound that algorithms are not only populating our lives with annoying targeted advertisements but might also be creating the most unequal societies that have ever existed. In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will explore key methodological overlaps and differences between humanistic and...
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    Pedagogy of the Oppressed

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    The seminar, co-taught with the artist Nicolás Guagnini, revolves around Paulo Freire's watershed text/manifesto Pedagogy of the Oppressed (1970). Freire was a philosopher of education in Brazil where, literacy was a requirement for voting in presidential elections, hence guaranteeing an exclusive and explicit link between education, class, and political representation. Throughout his career Freire fought against disenfranchisement through his advocacy of education. After his exile...
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    Economic Justice

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    Which is more just: capitalism or socialism? And how does that question intersect with racial justice? Capitalism has long reigned as the ideological solution to organizing society, but it is also clear that the pursuit of seemingly boundless material gain for some comes at the expense of others. The US and other countries have seen growing discontent around an ever-widening gap between rich and poor, and around the racial dimensions of that situation. Socialism addresses this wealth gap, but has a complex relationship with racial justice, and has had a checkered past around the world....

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    Educational Justice: Proseminar

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course will explore the kinds of experiences children should have in schools and how those experiences should be distributed. We'll proceed by examining key topics pertaining to educational justice, including competing principles of justice in the distribution of education (egalitarian principles, sufficientarian principles, prioritarian principles, etc.); competing reform agendas; the justifiability and relative priority of different educational aims (education for citizenship, education for...

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    The Body in American Religious History

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Three decades ago, Ramon Gutierrez studied the embodied ceremonies of the sixteenth-century Pueblo to identify crucial cosmological distinctions between their culture and that of the Spanish colonialists. For Gutierrez, differing conceptions of "the body" held the key to understanding so much else. Twenty years later, Judith Weisenfeld looked to the religious lives of African American women to construct "a compelling set of questions about the body as a site of religious experience...
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