Classes

    Qualitative Research Lab: Immigration, Citizenship, and Belonging

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    What does citizenship mean to the millions of people who immigrate to the United States? How do immigrants and their families experience the process, the complexities, and the challenges of immigration, integration, and naturalization? And how do undocumented and DACAmented immigrants describe the paradoxes of being a vital part of US society while being excluded from many formal categories of citizenship and belonging?
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    Introduction to Sociology

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    What is society? What is the role of the individual in society? How does the way society is organized affect the behaviors and beliefs of people who live in it? How can we change our societies? This course introduces students to the field of sociology. By surveying social theory as well as empirical studies, students acquire what C. Wright Mills calls the "sociological imagination": the ability to think beyond our personal lives and to connect the experiences of individuals with large social structures. Readings include prominent empirical investigations into family dynamics, class...

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    Gender and Health: Introductory Perspectives

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health—specifically, the ways in which gender contributes to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course proposes to answer such questions as: How can understanding gender structures help us interpret public health research? How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and...
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    The Health of Transgender and Gender Diverse People

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The goal of this course is to introduce students to transgender and gender diverse (TGD) public health, an emerging multidisciplinary field focused on the health and wellbeing of TGD adults (also referred to as gender minorities). Students will acquire foundational knowledge to understand and address the health and wellbeing of TGD people including: terminology, history of TGD health and medicine, and information about the make-up of who TGD communities; concepts, theories, and...
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    Legal History Workshop: Sex and the Law

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    This workshop, offered as a 1-credit course held over six sessions, aims to provide students with historical perspectives on the intersections between law and society. Assignments and class discussions will feature a mix of major works in the field of legal history, introducing students to critical methodologies and historical debates, and presentations by leading historians of the regulation of sex, gender, and sexuality. Further information about presentations and meeting dates will be available closer to the fall. 

     

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    Sex Equality

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    The relation between sex equality under law and sex and gender inequality in society is interrogated in theory and practice in the context of relevant social science, history, and international and comparative law. Mainstream equality doctrine is probed on its own terms and through an alternative. Cases largely on U.S. law focusing on concrete issues--including work, family, rape, sexual harassment, lesbian and gay rights, abortion, prostitution, pornography--structure the inquiry. Race, economic class, and transgender issues are mainstreamed. The purpose of the course is to understand,...

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    Transgender Law and Politics

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    An intensive examination of the legal, social, and political issues raised by the status and treatment of transgender persons, primarily but not exclusively in the United States. Sex, gender, sexuality, identity, and equality are interrogated. Issues and cases on discrimination and other relevant legal concepts arising in contexts of trans rights including health care, employment, sexual and other assault, housing, marriage, parenting, military, imprisonment, education, and athletics, with an optional section on immigration, are focused, with particular attention to sex and gender...

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    Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course investigates the realities of poverty through an intersectional lens, meaning that we will consider the simultaneous impact of race, gender, sexuality (and other identities) on economic insecurity. In what ways are conversations about poverty and its causes infused with assumptions and stereotypes related to gender, race, and sexuality? We hear so much in the media about what causes poverty – what is reality and what is myth? How do these myths operate to reinforce and...
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    Leaning In, Hooking Up: Visions of Feminism and Femininity in the 21st Century

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    What does it mean to “do” feminism, or to “be” a feminist in the 21st-century United States? What can we make of the dominant social expectations for a woman’s life? This course explores contemporary ideals of feminine success, including their physical, familial, professional, and political manifestations. We will engage with highly-contested topics—including sexual violence and Title 9; work-life balance; the imperatives of self-care and presentation; and new models for sexuality...
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    Psychology of Women

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    How does being a woman affect our behavior, our evaluations of ourselves, and our interactions with others? This course examines psychological science on women and girls in western industrialized societies, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, girlhood, women and work, relationships, pregnancy and motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and women in later adulthood. We will consider these topics through an understanding of gender as a social construction, being...
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    Sex, Gender, Sexuality

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Male/Female, Man/Woman, Masculine/Feminine, Straight/Gay. Where do these consequential categories come from? How do they generate inequalities? Why are they so easily reproduced? And what, if anything, should we do about it? Combining real-world applications with academic analyses, this course encourages you to think about how sexuality and gender have shaped the social world, as well as our own place within it.
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    Elizabeth Bishop and Others

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course introduces students to the poetry, literary prose, and artful correspondence of one of the major poets of the twentieth century, considering her innovations in all these genres. We will look at her writing in multiple genres alongside the mid-century shift from ‘closed’ to ‘open’ verse forms, and relate stylistic issues to the intellectual and social changes, and political and historical developments of the period. Bishop’s critique of received ideas about nationality,...
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    The Politics of Personal Writing

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    A long tradition of feminist writing asserts that the personal is political. In this creative writing class, we will critically examine the work of feminist and queer authors such as Dorothy Allison, Roxane Gay, Cathy Park Hong, Audre Lorde, Imani Perry, and Margaret Talusen who use personal experience as a starting point for arguments about class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Examining how these authors draw on traditions crafted by earlier authors such as James Baldwin...
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    Latinx, 1492 to 2022

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    The 530 years since Columbus’s arrival in Hispaniola have paid witness to the fall and rise of empires, the perseverance of colonial structures of power, and the construction and (re)creation of racial, sexual, and gendered identities. In the midst of such change and continuity, this course sets out to ask: what place does Latinx occupy in this long history? What does Latinidad look like when we trace it back 530 years, when we take 1492 to be its starting point instead of the 20th...
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    Live Theory (and Practice): A Graduate Proseminar in WGS Studies

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This WGS Graduate Proseminar will emphasize in-depth, lively conversations with WGS faculty about the interdisciplinary innovations of WGS Studies today, with singular attention to current debates in feminist and queer theories and practices. Each week, one member of the WGS faculty will guide the seminar in wide-ranging conversation about their own intellectual formation, about their own field of expertise, and about where and how their own writing fits...
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    Feminism and Anthropology

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course considers the relationship between feminism (as activist realm, as theoretical field, in its institutionalized form as gender studies) and anthropology. We will begin with early ethnographic writing by women and about women, and analyze some of the interventions feminists hope to make in anthropology. We will then examine the relationship between feminism and anthropology through two topics: kinship and politics. Our course will consider how feminist anthropologists...
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    Women's Voices in Asian and Asian American Literature

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course introduces students to the writings of both canonical and lesser-known Asian and Asian American women writers. The course especially examines the works by Chinese/ Chinese American, Japanese/ Japanese American, Korean/ Korean American women writers. Moving from the pre-modern to contemporary era, the course will explore a range of women’s voices and experiences as reflected through poetry, fiction, diaries, and epistles. Authors will include Murasaki Shikibu, Li...
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    Legacies of a Powerful Woman: The Life and Afterlife of Empress Theodora

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    One of the most controversial women of ancient and medieval history is Theodora, wife of Justinian I and empress of the Roman Empire in the 6th century CE. She has been variously portrayed as a hypersexual prostitute and power-hungry, vindictive manipulator, or as a saint, protectress of the needy, champion of women’s rights and revolutionary. Who was this woman really and why did she provoke such conflicting responses? In this seminar, we will explore the historical sources on...
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    Staging Critique: French Theater and the Social Body

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    How has theater in France, from the 17th-century to the present, served as a site of political, social, and philosophical reflection? In this course, we will attempt to answer that question by studying a selection of plays representing the major trends, movements, and writers of French theater from Jean Racine to Marie NDiaye. We will look in particular at how theater privileges the body and the language of emotion to reformulate and respond to questions regarding the relationship...
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