Classes

    Metaphysical Poetry: The Seventeenth-Century Lyric and Beyond

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In an age of scientific and political revolution, how do poets respond when common beliefs about God, humans, cosmic and social order, consciousness, and gender have been taken away? Modern poetry starts in the seventeenth century when poets, notably women poets, sought new grounds for poetic expression.
     
    Additional Information:
    Faculty: Gordon Teskey
    Semester: Full Fall Term
    Time: Tuesday, 3:45 - 5:45 pm
    ENGLISH 90QM

    Themes in American Studies

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course will be divided into two parts. In the first we will examine the works of a group of contemporary scholars (Tiya Miles, Lisa Lowe, Marisa Fuentes, Sarah Haley, Saidiya Hartman, Jose Munoz, and Daphne Brooks) who are deeply interested in the function of gender in our societies and whose work is either exclusively or largely focused on the Americas. More importantly, each of the individuals whose work we will examine is deeply committed both to using traditional archives...
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    Genre Fiction Workshop: Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Speculative Fiction, Horror, The Ghost Story, The New Weird

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The course will consist of two halves. In the first hour of each class, we will be doing close readings of an assigned text, with the aim of isolating some concept or aspect of the genre under discussion in order to take bearings for your own. The assigned reading is obligatory. We will look at the convergences and divergences in the various kinds and modes mentioned in the title of the course. We will be thinking of generic topoi, conceptual underpinnings, imagination, style,...
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    Women's voices in Brazilian culture(s)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this advanced language and culture course, students will refine their Portuguese language skills as they learn how Brazilian women have overcome prejudice and gender bias and adopted a leading role in the Brazilian culture and society. Through a range of texts (e.g. paintings, songs, movies, short stories, novels, tv shows) students will master complex grammatical structures and build on the communicative competence acquired in previous levels, with a particular emphasis on...
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    LGBT Life Stories

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this seminar we’ll read a range of classic LGBT life stories (memoirs, journals, diaries, essays, and autobiographies), beginning in the 1800s and ending in the present. We will study them as products of their specific historical moment, paying close attention to changing ideas about race, class, gender, and sexuality. Questions: How do people narrate the story of their identity? What aspects of their life histories do they highlight; what do they censor? How does the “coming...
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    Stories of Gender and Justice

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    With gender inequities and biases pervasive within and across cultures worldwide, and the global pandemics of gender-based violence and structural violence further intensified by the Covid-19 pandemic, how have individuals, groups, communities, and nations globally fought for (and against) gender justice? How have struggles against gender injustice intersected and conflicted with struggles against racial, ethnic, environmental, health, LGBTQIA+ and other forms of injustice? Gender...
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    Resistant Masculinity: Evolving Notions of Black Masculinities in U.S. History

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This seminar explores the relationships between gender, race, power, and violence from the foundation of the American republic through the modern era. We will examine scholarly texts and primary sources (memoirs, letters, photographs, illustrations, films, etc.) in order to chart the evolution of racialized masculine ideals across eras, class distinctions, and regions. Moreover, we will discuss how African Americans adhered to and challenged conventional notions of “manhood”...
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    Queer/Medieval

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The / in this course title can suggest a slippage or interchangeability; opposition and polarization; or erotic or romantic friction. This course functions as an introduction to queer theory as an intellectual tool with which to read texts far removed from the political, cultural, and social discourses from which queer theory emerged. We will ask: what can queer theory offer readers of medieval literature in its explorations of gender, sexuality, race, power, narrative, trauma, and...
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    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes. It is a comprehensive study of the representation of gender, love and sexuality in African American and...
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    Medeas of Seneca and Ovid

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    Wife, mother, sister, lover, killer, free-lance witch: Medea is one of Greek myth’s most multifaceted figures—and she gets away with it all. This course surveys a range of depictions of Medea in ancient literature, investigating how writers represent her across context, genre, and time. Primary readings in Latin will focus on Seneca’s tragedy Medea and Ovid’s treatments in his epic Metamorphoses and the elegiac Heroides. Additional texts, including Euripides’ Medea and Apollonius’...
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    Advanced French I: The Contemporary Francophone World Through Cinema

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    In this advanced French language and culture course, you will explore francophone culture(s) through contemporary films. The course is designed to strengthen language proficiency, explore different registers of language, and further refine your grammatical understanding while offering an introduction to film analysis. You will engage in interactive communicative activities exploring themes such as regional differences, Paris and the banlieue, immigration, post-colonialism, cinematic self-portraits, and gender through readings such as film reviews, interviews with directors, and script...

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    Advanced French II: Écrivons droit(s)/ Writing Right(s): Justice, Equity, Rights, and Writing

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    Through the lens of social justice issues in France and the Francophone world, this class will focus on writing as a means of civic engagement. You will interrogate topics such as colonialism, islamophobia, immigration, and sexism by studying a range of creative, analytical, and polemical texts, images, and film. This course builds on the communicative competence acquired in French 40, with a particular emphasis on developing your writing proficiency through creative and analytical writing projects such as description, portrait, film review, and polemical essays. This course will also...

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    A La Francaise: French Feminisms Today

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    Close readings of postwar French fiction and theory with emphasis on what is called "the feminine'' in key psychoanalytic, philosophical, and literary writings of the French poststructuralist tradition. In particular, we will focus on fifty years of dialogue between postwar theory in France and feminist practice in the United States. Writers considered include Cixous, Duras, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Wittig as well as Deleuze, Derrida, and Lacan. 

     

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    HIV in Global Perspective

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    As Covid 19 continues to dominate our historical moment, the pandemic has provoked culture wars over personal behavior, political fights over policy and funding, and sharp inequalities of care along national, economic, and racial divides. For the past few years, we have all felt hopeful optimism and then disappointed realism about the latest medical breakthrough, initial concern followed by compassion fatigue, and a widespread sense of helplessness in the face of an unrelenting virus. These dynamics at the intersection of culture, society, medicine, and public health also defined a...

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    Anyone's Germany: Redefining Identity in Contemporary German Fiction

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    What does it mean to be German today? Contemporary German society abounds with Grenzüberschreiter of varying kinds: generations who were raised in a divided Germany but came of age in a reunified, globalized Bundesrepublik; communities of multi-generational German nationals whose identities nevertheless inherit the problematic international labor-politics of both the East and the West; voices demanding greater visibility of Germany’s postcolonial legacy and sparking viral debates...
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    Poetry Workshop: Form and Content

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this workshop, we’ll look closely at the craft-based choices poets make, and track the effects they have upon what we as readers are made to think and feel. How can implementing similar strategies better prepare us to engage the questions making up our own poetic material? We’ll also talk about content. What can poetry reveal about the ways our interior selves are shaped by public realities like race, class, sexuality, injustice and more?
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    Sophomore Tutorial: Literary Methods

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course, taught in small groups and required for concentrators, introduces theories, interpretive frameworks, and central questions about literature and literary media. What do we do when we read? What is an author? What do we mean by “literature” itself? How might we compare and evaluate interpretations? How do the historical, social, cultural, and legal frameworks around a text shape its meanings and its effects? Combining major critical and theoretical writings with primary...
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