Classes

    Transnationalism and the Francophone World: Race, Gender, Sexuality

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2020

    This graduate course links different regions of the Francophone world and provides an introduction to the major debates about gender issues in postcolonial Francophone studies. We focus on the aesthetics and politics of writers who challenge the notion of a stable identity, be it national, racial or sexual. The course draws on the historico-cultural issues pertinent to each region (Africa, the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean). Writers include Mariama Bâ (Senegal), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe/France/USA), Ananda Devi (Mauritius and France), Fatou Diome (Senegal and France), Assia Djebar (Algeria/France/USA), Marie Chauvet (Haiti), Shenaz Patel (Mauritius), and Linda Lê (Vietnam and France).
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    Native American Women: History and Myth

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2020

    This course explores histories of women from diverse indigenous nations within the current boundaries of the United States. We will attend closely to methods and sources employed in historical inquiry about Native women even as we track change over time in a range of contexts. We will address multiple themes that intersect in Native women’s experience: tensions between history and myth, concepts of family and intimate relationships, spiritual understandings and notions of tradition, gender roles and cross-cultural gender difference, processes of colonialism, conceptions of land and effects of land dispossession, cultural negotiation and adaptation, public representation and misrepresentation, and personal, familial, and tribal perseverance. 

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    The Politics of Yiddish

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    A bastardized German, a jargon, a woman's vernacular, an old world language, a dying and ghostly tongue, a Hasidic language, a queer language, a radical language-these are just a few of the ways that Yiddish has been labeled over its one-thousand-year history. This course will trace the shifting politics attached to Yiddish from its early modern beginnings as a language of translation between Jewish and non-Jewish cultures to its postwar vacillation between a language of mourning and nostalgia, Jewish American humor, Hasidic isolation, and contemporary Jewish radicalism.... Read more about The Politics of Yiddish

    Race, Gender, and American Empire

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This seminar explores the culture and politics of American imperialism from the late 19th century to the present, with particular attention to race and gender. This writing and discussion-intensive course encourages students to examine how formal and informal imperial relations developed, and to analyze how American empire functioned on the ground for those who imposed it and those who resisted, appropriated, or accommodated it.... Read more about Race, Gender, and American Empire

    Assertive Stitches: Domestic Arts and Public Conflict

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    In January 2017, the Pussyhat Project created an effective visual unity for the Women's March on Washington, although the pink hats were also criticized as vulgar, trivial and exclusionary. This is not that first time that needlework has played a central (and controversial) role in political protest: Its associations with femininity and family life have been used to underscore contrasts between domestic morality and public policy, as well as to subvert or confirm gendered notions of decorum and citizenship.... Read more about Assertive Stitches: Domestic Arts and Public Conflict

    Global Feminisms

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Feminism shapes the world we live in today. Debates about women's and sexual rights define almost every public debate today -- from sexual harassment, to electoral politics, to development, public health, human rights, and political protest. But when, and where, did ideas of women's equal rights and liberation emerge? This course digs into the deep history of feminism from a global perspective.... Read more about Global Feminisms

    Heredity and Reproduction

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The sciences of human heredity and reproduction from Aristotle to Margaret Atwood. Readings include classic philosophical, scientific, and literary sources. The course takes up themes of technology and control; gender, race, class, and sexuality; scientific ethics; and interactions between biology and society.... Read more about Heredity and Reproduction

    The Music of Women Creators

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    In spite of significant gains in gender equality over the last half century, women creators remain dramatically underrepresented in the music world, in all genres of music and in all categories of musical production: as composers, improvisors, producers, conductors, and even as performers. The course is intended to celebrate and acknowledge the contributions of women creators to the history of music.... Read more about The Music of Women Creators

    Interracial Intimacy: Sex, Race, and Romance in the U.S.

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    What assumptions about race and sex are embedded in the term 'interracial,' and why are different types of interracial relationships viewed differently? How did White fears of relationships between Black men and White women influence the creation of the Ku Klux Klan? How did the story of Pocahontas influence the development of a settler colonial state?... Read more about Interracial Intimacy: Sex, Race, and Romance in the U.S.

    History and Human Capital

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Explores a range of subjects concerning human capital, historically and comparatively. Topics include fertility, mortality, health, immigration, women's work, child labor, retirement, education, inequality, slavery, unionization, and governmental regulation of labor, all within the broader context of economic history.... Read more about History and Human Capital

    Power, Knowledge, Identity: Critical Approaches to Race and Ethnicity

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    How might critical attention to race and ethnicity as they intersect with gender and sexuality—and also frameworks of indigeneity and class—shape how we study? How do these lenses shift the questions we ask, the information that counts as data, and the genres of work that we recognize as 'academic'?... Read more about Power, Knowledge, Identity: Critical Approaches to Race and Ethnicity

    Elizabeth Bishop and Others

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course introduces students to the poetry, literary prose, and artful correspondence of one of the major poets of the twentieth century, considering her innovations in all these genres. We will look at her writing in multiple genres alongside the mid-century shift from ‘closed’ to ‘open’ verse forms, and relate stylistic issues to the intellectual and social changes, and political and historical developments of the period.... Read more about Elizabeth Bishop and Others

    Women as Photographers in Weimar Germany and in Exile

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    An extraordinary number of women trained to become photographers in Weimar Germany (1919-1933). Their presence and practices dramatically altered the conditions of visual culture in a country that had never achieved the levels of French modernism, for example, neither in terms of its aesthetic complexity nor in terms of its contributions to nation state identity.... Read more about Women as Photographers in Weimar Germany and in Exile

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