Classes

    Threads: Histories and Theories of Clothing and Fashion

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course focuses on fashion and clothing in Japan from the medieval period to the present day. It aims to build a knowledge base of historically contextualized case studies through readings, lectures, and discussions. In the process, it explores questions about clothing as a site around which societal debates occur, where personal and collective identities are shaped, and where foundational philosophical ideas come into focus. Theoretical readings will allow students to apply...
    Read more about Threads: Histories and Theories of Clothing and Fashion

    Resistant Masculinity: Evolving Notions of Black Masculinities in U.S. History

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This seminar explores the relationships between gender, race, power, and violence from the foundation of the American republic through the modern era. We will examine scholarly texts and primary sources (memoirs, letters, photographs, illustrations, films, etc.) in order to chart the evolution of racialized masculine ideals across eras, class distinctions, and regions. Moreover, we will discuss how African Americans adhered to and challenged conventional notions of “manhood”...
    Read more about Resistant Masculinity: Evolving Notions of Black Masculinities in U.S. History

    The Making of Inequalities in Latin America: Seminar

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    This new iteration of the Latin American History Workshop will examine recent historiography on the region focusing on the making of social, racial and gender inequalities. The seminar will explore three main areas of scholarship: first, slavery and other forms of forced labor and its relationship with the emergence of racial ideologies; second, gender inequalities, especially in regard to struggles to obtain labor and reproductive rights; third, the enduring struggles for democracy in the region, comprising resistance to dictatorships, military interventionism, and right-wing extremism...

    Read more about The Making of Inequalities in Latin America: Seminar

    Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, and the Transpacific Ethnography of Asian America

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    Ethnic studies is the critical interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and indigeneity as understood from the intellectual, political, and cultural histories and perspectives of minoritized groups in the United States. Ethnic studies scholars analyze the social dynamics of race, racism, and various forms of institutionalized violence including the historical and lasting legacies of colonialism, chattel slavery, US imperalism, white supremacy, and more. In particular, Asian...
    Read more about Ethnic Studies, Anthropology, and the Transpacific Ethnography of Asian America

    Memory and Diaspora

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    Diasporas are frequently invoked to emphasize shared history and the possibility of shared identity. Yet the question of what is held in common is in constant negotiation and flux. We will consider how contemporary ideas about race, culture, and belonging are entangled with what is remembered, and how and why. They evolve from complex dealings with migration, intergenerational dynamics, gender, sexuality, language, and religion, and with internal and external narratives of origin,...
    Read more about Memory and Diaspora

    Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course is intended to provide hands-on practice toward doing research on Latinx issues, with an approach grounded in the understanding that terms ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latinidad’ are not static concepts and, at the same time, not a homogeneous mix. We will examine culture, intellectual production, languages, economics, and political thought, as well as the dynamics of Latino/a/e people in the United States. Throughout the class, students will become familiar with a wide range of...
    Read more about Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

    Qualitative Research Lab: Immigration, Citizenship, and Belonging

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    What does citizenship mean to the millions of people who immigrate to the United States? How do immigrants and their families experience the process, the complexities, and the challenges of immigration, integration, and naturalization? And how do undocumented and DACAmented immigrants describe the paradoxes of being a vital part of US society while being excluded from many formal categories of citizenship and belonging?
    ... Read more about Qualitative Research Lab: Immigration, Citizenship, and Belonging

    Introduction to Sociology

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    What is society? What is the role of the individual in society? How does the way society is organized affect the behaviors and beliefs of people who live in it? How can we change our societies? This course introduces students to the field of sociology. By surveying social theory as well as empirical studies, students acquire what C. Wright Mills calls the "sociological imagination": the ability to think beyond our personal lives and to connect the experiences of individuals with large social structures. Readings include prominent empirical investigations into family dynamics, class...

    Read more about Introduction to Sociology

    Staging Critique: French Theater and the Social Body

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    How has theater in France, from the 17th-century to the present, served as a site of political, social, and philosophical reflection? In this course, we will attempt to answer that question by studying a selection of plays representing the major trends, movements, and writers of French theater from Jean Racine to Marie NDiaye. We will look in particular at how theater privileges the body and the language of emotion to reformulate and respond to questions regarding the relationship...
    Read more about Staging Critique: French Theater and the Social Body

    Prison Abolition

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Is prison abolition a serious proposal, an aspirational ideal, a trendy slogan, or a blueprint for social transformation? This interdisciplinary and community-engaged course situates the prison abolition movement in deep historical context and explores its current relation to the politics of criminal justice reform. We will study the movement’s connections to slavery abolitionism, anti-lynching activism, Indigenous struggles for sovereignty, and the Black Power movement. We will...
    Read more about Prison Abolition

    Carceral Empire

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Mass incarceration is a catastrophe in the United States, especially affecting Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and poor communities. Different forms of carceral confinements have long been an integral part of the formation of the United States and other settler colonies in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on the history of Indigenous confinements. While the incarceration of Indigenous peoples today resembles the incarceration of other minoritized peoples, it has similar and...
    Read more about Carceral Empire

    Introduction to African American Studies

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course aims to provide an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array of African-American cultural and political practices from slavery to the present. The course will involve close readings of a variety of primary sources and classic texts that present key issues in African American thought and practice. The course will place special emphasis on debates concerning African American people with the goal of introducing students to the process and the methodology of...
    Read more about Introduction to African American Studies

    Literature, Diaspora, Migration, and Trauma

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course examines a diverse range of creative and critical discourses on trauma and the global African; East, South, Southeast, and West Asian (Chinese, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese); and Middle Eastern (Jewish, Palestinian, Lebanese); as well as Latin American diasporas. We focus on the connections among diasporas, displacement, migration, and trauma, and on the relationships of these phenomena and constructions and understandings of artistic and cultural identities, ethnicity/race...

    Read more about Literature, Diaspora, Migration, and Trauma

    History and Human Capital

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    Explores a range of subjects concerning human capital, historically, theoretically, and comparatively. Topics include human capital and economic growth, population and fertility, health and public interventions, education and training, economic inequality, gender and the family, slavery and race, and intergenerational mobility, all within the broad context of economic history. A research paper or significant proposal and a final exam are required. 

     

    ...
    Read more about History and Human Capital

    Law and American Society

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    At a time when the rule of law is imperiled, our democracy and equal rights of every kind under assault by multiple forces, the importance of understanding our constitutional system of rights and laws as essential to the fabric of the nation cannot be overstated. The course will examine law as a vehicle of political conflict and a defining force in American society in four dimensions: 1.) as it establishes individual rights, liberties, and the limits of toleration; 2.) as it attempts to resolve differences among competing constituencies; 3.) as it sets out terms of punishment and social...
    Read more about Law and American Society