Classes

    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes.... Read more about How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    The Politics of Yiddish

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    A bastardized German, a jargon, a woman's vernacular, an old world language, a dying and ghostly tongue, a Hasidic language, a queer language, a radical language-these are just a few of the ways that Yiddish has been labeled over its one-thousand-year history. This course will trace the shifting politics attached to Yiddish from its early modern beginnings as a language of translation between Jewish and non-Jewish cultures to its postwar vacillation between a language of mourning and nostalgia, Jewish American humor, Hasidic isolation, and contemporary Jewish radicalism.... Read more about The Politics of Yiddish

    Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In a powerful essay, the late writer and activist Audre Lorde suggested, “Where the words of women are crying to be heard we must each of us recognize our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them and examine them in their pertinence to our lives.” Lorde is not alone in asking us to pay attention to and take responsibility for women’s stories; for centuries scholars and activists alike have championed the words of women, including women of color and queer women, whose stories have routinely gone untold or unheard.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Modern Women’s Writing and Religion

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course explores relationships between 19th- and 20th-century women’s movements and religion by considering spiritual and religious practices in fiction, poetry, and essays by writers including Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, and Zora Neale Hurston, alongside essays by critics such as Saba Mahmood and theologians such as Katie G. Cannon.

    ... Read more about Modern Women’s Writing and Religion