Classes

    Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This class explores the relationships of passion, love, and obligation that bound men and women over the course of nearly two millennia, from Rome in the first century B.C.E. to sixteenth-century Italy. In particular, it focuses on how those relationships were organized legally and institutionally, on the social roles created by such relationships, and on the connection (or lack thereof) between marriage, love, and sexual passion.... Read more about Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    Immigration and Gender

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The study of immigration and the study of gender often do not intersect. This is despite the fact that scholars in both fields of study focus on questions concerning cultural membership and equal citizenship and the processes that produce social inequality. The goal of this course is to reinvigorate the linkages between gender and immigration.... Read more about Immigration and Gender

    Resisting Toxicity: Rachel Carson, Dolores Huerta, and Environmental Nonfiction

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Rachel Carson, the author of Silent Spring, and Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farmworkers Union, both campaigned against toxic exposures in the mid-20th-century United States and yet are rarely considered in tandem. This course puts the writings and activism of these two women in conversation, ranging through feminist, queer, and Latinx environmental writing to build connections between environmentalism and labor rights.... Read more about Resisting Toxicity: Rachel Carson, Dolores Huerta, and Environmental Nonfiction

    Who Gets Represented?

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Who serves in Congress and other legislatures, and do the backgrounds of politicians affect how policies are decided and which policies get adopted? This seminar explores the political representation of different groups in society, and the consequences of representation for policy outcomes.... Read more about Who Gets Represented?

    Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course investigates the realities of poverty through an intersectional lens, meaning that we will consider the simultaneous impact of race, gender, sexuality (and other identities) on economic insecurity. In what ways are conversations about poverty and its causes infused with assumptions and stereotypes related to gender, race, and sexuality?... Read more about Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This is a graduate-level seminar focused on the descriptive representation of groups in politics, and the consequences of representation for substantive policy outcomes. Topics include the representation of women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, religious groups, geographic regions, class interests, and other social divisions, and how to understand the sources of variation in representation across time and institutional contexts.... Read more about Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The 1960s and 1970s witnessed dynamic movements of collective action in the United States and the world. This research seminar charts the key events, actors, ideas and strategies of these movements—from civil rights and black power to women’s rights and the conservative movement—and situates them within the central economic, social, and geopolitical developments of the post-World War II period.... Read more about Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Women in US Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course examines the causes and consequences of gender inequality in politics, the workforce, and the household. We will draw on theory and literature from political science and other disciplines to learn about cutting edge research in the field, focusing on the United States (with some application to other advanced democracies).... Read more about Women in US Politics

    Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    We often think of slavery as being a dark chapter in our past, but this is a tragic oversimplification. What defines slavery in the modern world, and what are the moral, political and social implications of its continued existence? As we explore its underpinnings, we discover that all of us may be in some way complicit in its survival.... Read more about Human Trafficking, Slavery and Abolition in the Modern World

    Introduction to Latinx Studies

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this survey course we will problematize the project of Latinidad — tracing its contours as they have been shaped by historical systems and processes of power such as racialization, gender, sexuality, class, ability, and nation. Following a comparative and critical Ethnic Studies approach, students will gain historical and transdisciplinary perspectives towards the possibilities and limitations of Latinx identity and discourse.... Read more about Introduction to Latinx Studies

    Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In a powerful essay, the late writer and activist Audre Lorde suggested, “Where the words of women are crying to be heard we must each of us recognize our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them and examine them in their pertinence to our lives.” Lorde is not alone in asking us to pay attention to and take responsibility for women’s stories; for centuries scholars and activists alike have championed the words of women, including women of color and queer women, whose stories have routinely gone untold or unheard.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Telling Her Story: Narrative, Media, and #MeToo

    Expository Writing 20: Sexism and Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Today, the United States Congress is 19.4% female. That statistic trails the world average of 23.3%, with Nordic, European, sub-Saharan African, and Asian countries achieving better gender balance in national legislatures than the U.S. Some scholars contend that when women run, they are no more likely to win or lose compared to their male counterparts, though they are simply less likely to run in the first place. Other scholars identify a strong correlation between voting and sexist attitudes, notably in the 2016 U.S. election.... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Sexism and Politics

    Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The U.S. comprises 5% of the world’s population but holds approximately 40% of the world’s guns. We also experience more gun-related deaths than any economically comparable nation. How did the nation become a “gun culture,” and whose rights and interests does widespread armament serve? Who is included in the Second Amendment’s appeal to “the right of the people to have and bear arms,” and how have notions of race, gender, class, and sexuality framed popular understandings of “good guys” and “good women” whose armed citizenship is required for the nation’s security?... Read more about Guns in the U.S.: A Love Story