Classes

    Sex Equality

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    The relation between sex equality under law and sex and gender inequality in society is interrogated in theory and practice in the context of relevant social science, history, and international and comparative law. Mainstream equality doctrine is probed on its own terms and through an alternative. Cases largely on U.S. law focusing on concrete issues--including work, family, rape, sexual harassment, lesbian and gay rights, abortion, prostitution, pornography--structure the inquiry. Race, economic class, and transsexuality are mainstreamed. The purpose of the course is to understand, criticize, and expand the law toward sex and gender equality, including between women and men, as well as to expand the equality paradigm.

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    Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Bioethics

    Semester: 

    Winter

    Offered: 

    2020

    In its attention to gender, race, and sexuality, feminist bioethics challenges and expands contemporary bioethical theory and practice. Drawing from philosophy, theology, law, medicine, public health, and the social and biological sciences, this interdisciplinary field is both critical and constructive in addressing bioethical theory, method, and substantive ethical concerns across the clinical, research, organizational, public policy, and global spheres. In a largely seminar format, we will review the theoretical landscape and social movements that prompted the emergence of feminist...

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    Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This class explores the relationships of passion, love, and obligation that bound men and women over the course of nearly two millennia, from Rome in the first century B.C.E. to sixteenth-century Italy. In particular, it focuses on how those relationships were organized legally and institutionally, on the social roles created by such relationships, and on the connection (or lack thereof) between marriage, love, and sexual passion.... Read more about Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    LGBTQ+ Advocacy Clinic

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    The Harvard LGBTQ+ Advocacy Clinic (HLAC) offers students the opportunity to work directly on cutting-edge issues involving LGBTQ+ rights, with a particular emphasis on issues affecting underrepresented communities within the LGBTQ+ community. Clinic offerings include local and national projects covering the spectrum of LGBTQ+ issues.... Read more about LGBTQ+ Advocacy Clinic

    Reproductive Rights and Justice

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course will examine how laws impede or increase access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care domestically and internationally. Special attention will be paid to understanding the role of social movements in legal and political debates about reproductive rights and the contestation around the use of scientific and medical evidence in law reform efforts.... Read more about Reproductive Rights and Justice

    Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, and the Law

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This course explores the ways in which the law intersects with gender identity and sexual orientation, examining this complex and evolving area of law in the context of a changing judicial and political landscape. Taught by a leading practitioner in the field, this course emphasizes the legal tools and decision-making processes involved in doing pathbreaking civil rights work.... Read more about Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, and the Law

    Resisting Toxicity: Rachel Carson, Dolores Huerta, and Environmental Nonfiction

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Rachel Carson, the author of Silent Spring, and Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farmworkers Union, both campaigned against toxic exposures in the mid-20th-century United States and yet are rarely considered in tandem. This course puts the writings and activism of these two women in conversation, ranging through feminist, queer, and Latinx environmental writing to build connections between environmentalism and labor rights.... Read more about Resisting Toxicity: Rachel Carson, Dolores Huerta, and Environmental Nonfiction

    Who Gets Represented?

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Who serves in Congress and other legislatures, and do the backgrounds of politicians affect how policies are decided and which policies get adopted? This seminar explores the political representation of different groups in society, and the consequences of representation for policy outcomes.... Read more about Who Gets Represented?

    Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course investigates the realities of poverty through an intersectional lens, meaning that we will consider the simultaneous impact of race, gender, sexuality (and other identities) on economic insecurity. In what ways are conversations about poverty and its causes infused with assumptions and stereotypes related to gender, race, and sexuality?... Read more about Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021
    In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

    Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This is a graduate-level seminar focused on the descriptive representation of groups in politics, and the consequences of representation for substantive policy outcomes. Topics include the representation of women, racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, religious groups, geographic regions, class interests, and other social divisions, and how to understand the sources of variation in representation across time and institutional contexts.... Read more about Descriptive and Substantive Representation

    Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The 1960s and 1970s witnessed dynamic movements of collective action in the United States and the world. This research seminar charts the key events, actors, ideas and strategies of these movements—from civil rights and black power to women’s rights and the conservative movement—and situates them within the central economic, social, and geopolitical developments of the post-World War II period.... Read more about Power and Protest: U.S. Social Movements in the 1960s and 1970s

    Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Bioethics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    In its attention to gender, race, and sexuality, this course challenges and expands contemporary bioethical theory and practice. Drawing from philosophy, theology, law, medicine, public health, and the social and biological sciences, this interdisciplinary field is both critical and constructive in addressing bioethical theory, method, and substantive ethical concerns across the clinical, research, organizational, public policy, and global spheres.... Read more about Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Bioethics

    Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this course, we will explore the political and politicized lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer peoples living in the United States since World War II. Centering both an intersectional analysis and historical critique of “progress,” we will focus our attention on the interrelationship between protest (how LGBTQ people have organized themselves and expressed their demands in the face of systemic oppression), politics (how LGBTQ people have navigated the “culture wars”), and policy (how LGBTQ people have shaped and been shaped by laws and legislation) across the Homophile Generation (1940s and 1950s), Stonewall Generation (1960s and 1970s), AIDS Generation (1980s and 1990s), and Marriage Generation (2000s to present).... Read more about Queer Nation: LGBTQ Protest, Politics, and Policy in the United States