Classes

    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes.... Read more about How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Affects, Bodies, Ecologies: Borders of Performance from Antiquity to the Early Modern World

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Pandemics such as COVID-19 have revealed not only the fragility of the human body within an equally delicate environment, but also our deep connection and commitment to artistic performances-the latter were the first to be canceled due to the high risk of infection and will be the last to return. This course asks how performance in its manifold guises (theater, processions, auto da fés, carnivals, etc.) and the presence (or absence) of the human body in public, on stage, and in the audience was negotiated in the early modern period.... Read more about Affects, Bodies, Ecologies: Borders of Performance from Antiquity to the Early Modern World

    Queer/Medieval

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The "/" in this course title can suggest slippage or interchangeability, opposition and polarization, or (in fanfiction tagging conventions) erotic or romantic friction between two entities. This course functions as an introduction to queer theory as an intellectual tool with which to read texts far removed from the modern political, cultural, and social discourses from which queer theory emerged.... Read more about Queer/Medieval

    Elizabeth Bishop and Others

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course introduces students to the poetry, literary prose, and artful correspondence of one of the major poets of the twentieth century, considering her innovations in all these genres. We will look at her writing in multiple genres alongside the mid-century shift from ‘closed’ to ‘open’ verse forms, and relate stylistic issues to the intellectual and social changes, and political and historical developments of the period.... Read more about Elizabeth Bishop and Others

    Writing Women: Workshop

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Women have historically exerted their voice and power through writing, even as the professional writing trades of journalism and publishing have historically been unwelcoming of their presence. This seminar class will examine reporting and writing by and about women, and engage students in the practice of writing about gender, feminism, and women’s lives.... Read more about Writing Women: Workshop

    A Voice of One's Own: Creative Writing in Women, Gender, and Sexuality

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    How does one balance the demands of "politics" with the subtleties of "artistry?"  In this course, we’ll write and analyze short stories, paying close attention to key writing concepts such as characterization, voice, point of view, dialogue, and setting, while also investigating thematic issues related to women, gender, and sexuality studies.... Read more about A Voice of One's Own: Creative Writing in Women, Gender, and Sexuality

    Queer Fictions

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    A survey of modern and contemporary queer writing from twentieth- and twenty-first-century French literature. We will read writers such as Jean Genet, Hervé Guibert, Édouard Louis, Mireille Best, Violette Leduc, Monique Wittig, Anne Garréta.... Read more about Queer Fictions

    Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This seminar looks at the expanding range of genres, forms and strategies pursued by modern and contemporary authors who want to represent LGBTQ+- lives, communities, bodies and selves; poems and performances, novels and stories, YA (young adult) fiction and science fiction, memoirs and graphic novels, will all be  represented, along with a light frame of what's usually called queer theory and some points of comparison, or contrast, from earlier centuries. Bechdel, Audre Lorde, O'Hara, Whitman, Walden, and many others.... Read more about Introduction to LGBTQ Literature

    Gender, War, Writing, Rhetoric, and Reading: Troilus and Criseyde from Late Medieval to Early Modern

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The material of this course consists of the following exceptionally rich late medieval and early modern Trojan materials: Chaucer’s House of Fame; Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde; Lydgate’s Troy Book (Book 2); Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid; and Shakespeare’s Troilus and Cressida. We will be guided into these materials by the inter-related topics listed in the course title. Wherever possible and appropriate, we will absorb the publication conditions and media of these texts and/or performances.... Read more about Gender, War, Writing, Rhetoric, and Reading: Troilus and Criseyde from Late Medieval to Early Modern

    Queer Fictions

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

     

    A survey of modern and contemporary twentieth- and twenty-first-century queer French literature. We will begin first with an introduction to some canonical texts in queer theory (e.g. Sedgwick, Butler, Bersani, Warner) and proceed to the fictions (Genet, Guibert, Louis, Leduc, Wittig, Best, Garréta) to see the ways in which literature itself theorizes and does the work of deconstructing identity and desire.

    ... Read more about Queer Fictions

    Queer (and Queering) Cinema

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course seeks to map a history and to expand the boundaries of what is commonly thought of as queer cinema. We will explore LGBTQ films within a variety of frameworks, including but not limited to queer history, theory, and politics, and across a range of modes and genres, from classical Hollywood to the experimental underground.... Read more about Queer (and Queering) Cinema

    A La Francaise: French Feminisms Today

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Close readings of postwar French fiction and theory with emphasis on what is called "the feminine'' in key psychoanalytic, philosophical, and literary writings of the French poststructuralist tradition. In particular, we will focus on fifty years of dialogue between postwar theory in France and feminist practice in the United States. Writers considered include Cixous, Duras, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Wittig as well as Deleuze, Derrida, and Lacan....

    Read more about A La Francaise: French Feminisms Today

    Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

     

    “Reader, I married him.” As this famous line from Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre reminds us, writers have long been preoccupied with matters of the heart. Courtship plots are everywhere, from the novels of Jane Austen to the “rom-coms” of the 1980s and 1990s to essays you can find every Sunday in the “Styles” section of the New York Times. For centuries, marriage was primarily an economic relationship, and love outside of marriage ended in humiliation or even death. But what happens when society expands the options for living and loving?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: Modern Love

    Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    The femme fatale—the attractive, seductive woman who brings about the downfall of men—has fascinated us through the ages, from Biblical figures like Eve and Delilah, to historical women such as Cleopatra and Wallis Simpson, to the media personas of modern pop stars like Cardi B and Miley Cyrus. In the classic femme fatale narrative, the woman’s dangerous actions empower her, but she also must submit to the fact that her empowerment renders her a villain. Might this contradiction in the femme fatale’s character reflect tensions in our own evolving understanding of gender? How can the femme fatale character help us untangle the real-world gender problems that modern women and men face?... Read more about Expository Writing 20: The Femme Fatale

    Shakespeare's Women

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Rosalind, Portia, Ophelia, Juliet, Isabella, Cressida, Cleopatra, Cordelia, Imogen, Volumnia, Miranda, Lady Macbeth—the women of Shakespeare’s plays have become iconic figures, cited, admired, critiqued, and invoked in every generation. But in the English public theater of Shakespeare’s time no women were permitted to appear onstage.... Read more about Shakespeare's Women

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