Classes

    Black Women's Voices in the #MeToo Era

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    When accepting the Oscar for Best Actress in 2015 Patricia Arquette said the following: 'The truth is, right under the surface, there are huge issues that are at play that do affect women, and it's time for all the women in America and all the men that love women and all the gay people and all the people of color that we all fought for to fight for us now.' This course examines why such statements are part of a larger and longer tradition of disappearing black women and why they are popular in the cultural zeitgeist.... Read more about Black Women's Voices in the #MeToo Era

    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes.... Read more about How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    The Politics of Yiddish

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    A bastardized German, a jargon, a woman's vernacular, an old world language, a dying and ghostly tongue, a Hasidic language, a queer language, a radical language-these are just a few of the ways that Yiddish has been labeled over its one-thousand-year history. This course will trace the shifting politics attached to Yiddish from its early modern beginnings as a language of translation between Jewish and non-Jewish cultures to its postwar vacillation between a language of mourning and nostalgia, Jewish American humor, Hasidic isolation, and contemporary Jewish radicalism.... Read more about The Politics of Yiddish

    Affects, Bodies, Ecologies: Borders of Performance from Antiquity to the Early Modern World

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Pandemics such as COVID-19 have revealed not only the fragility of the human body within an equally delicate environment, but also our deep connection and commitment to artistic performances-the latter were the first to be canceled due to the high risk of infection and will be the last to return. This course asks how performance in its manifold guises (theater, processions, auto da fés, carnivals, etc.) and the presence (or absence) of the human body in public, on stage, and in the audience was negotiated in the early modern period.... Read more about Affects, Bodies, Ecologies: Borders of Performance from Antiquity to the Early Modern World

    Gender and Ritual in Ancient Egyptian Funerary Practices

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020
    Ancient Egyptian men and women constructed enduring mortuary monuments, compiled funerary texts, and created elaborate myths & intricate rituals to deal with death. This course explores how women feature in ancient Egyptian conceptions of death, salvation, and the afterlife and whether the Egyptians conceived of gendered pathways to the afterlife.... Read more about Gender and Ritual in Ancient Egyptian Funerary Practices

    Race, Gender, and American Empire

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This seminar explores the culture and politics of American imperialism from the late 19th century to the present, with particular attention to race and gender. This writing and discussion-intensive course encourages students to examine how formal and informal imperial relations developed, and to analyze how American empire functioned on the ground for those who imposed it and those who resisted, appropriated, or accommodated it.... Read more about Race, Gender, and American Empire

    Queer/Medieval

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The "/" in this course title can suggest slippage or interchangeability, opposition and polarization, or (in fanfiction tagging conventions) erotic or romantic friction between two entities. This course functions as an introduction to queer theory as an intellectual tool with which to read texts far removed from the modern political, cultural, and social discourses from which queer theory emerged.... Read more about Queer/Medieval

    Assertive Stitches: Domestic Arts and Public Conflict

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    In January 2017, the Pussyhat Project created an effective visual unity for the Women's March on Washington, although the pink hats were also criticized as vulgar, trivial and exclusionary. This is not that first time that needlework has played a central (and controversial) role in political protest: Its associations with femininity and family life have been used to underscore contrasts between domestic morality and public policy, as well as to subvert or confirm gendered notions of decorum and citizenship.... Read more about Assertive Stitches: Domestic Arts and Public Conflict

    LGBT Life Stories

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    In this seminar we'll read a range of classic LGBT life stories (memoirs, journals, diaries, essays, and autobiographies), beginning in the 1800s and ending in the present. We will study them as products of their specific historical moment, paying close attention to changing ideas about race, class, gender, and sexuality.... Read more about LGBT Life Stories

    Sex, Money, and Power in the Postcolonial World

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    With globalization, sex-everywhere-has become more central to who we are as citizens and consumers, how we gain rights and resources, and how we relate to others as members of a specific race, ethnicity, region, or culture. Worldwide, states invest or disinvest in people according to how they have sex, adopt gender identities, or sustain sexual morality.... Read more about Sex, Money, and Power in the Postcolonial World

    Global Feminisms

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    Feminism shapes the world we live in today. Debates about women's and sexual rights define almost every public debate today -- from sexual harassment, to electoral politics, to development, public health, human rights, and political protest. But when, and where, did ideas of women's equal rights and liberation emerge? This course digs into the deep history of feminism from a global perspective.... Read more about Global Feminisms

    Heredity and Reproduction

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The sciences of human heredity and reproduction from Aristotle to Margaret Atwood. Readings include classic philosophical, scientific, and literary sources. The course takes up themes of technology and control; gender, race, class, and sexuality; scientific ethics; and interactions between biology and society.... Read more about Heredity and Reproduction

    Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This class explores the relationships of passion, love, and obligation that bound men and women over the course of nearly two millennia, from Rome in the first century B.C.E. to sixteenth-century Italy. In particular, it focuses on how those relationships were organized legally and institutionally, on the social roles created by such relationships, and on the connection (or lack thereof) between marriage, love, and sexual passion.... Read more about Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

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