Classes

    Writing Women: Workshop

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2020

    Women have historically exerted their voice and power through writing, even as the professional writing trades of journalism and publishing have historically been unwelcoming of their presence. This seminar class will examine reporting and writing by and about women, and engage students in the practice of writing about gender, feminism, and women’s lives. Students will produce and workshop their own researched and reported longform articles, while simultaneously inspecting how the media represents women’s issues and learning the history of women writers in American journalism. We will grapple with questions of interviewing, structure, creative expression, ethics, and fair representation, along with the fundaments of narrative nonfiction.


    ... Read more about Writing Women: Workshop

    Men, Women and Work

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2019

    Why do men and women tend to cluster into different occupations? Why do they earn different wages? Is there a certain path that all countries follow as they become more economically prosperous, or do issues concerning men's and women's work differ dramatically across countries because of cultural reasons? This course provides an overview of key issues and perspectives in the study of men, women, and work in contemporary society. 
    ... Read more about Men, Women and Work

    Psychology of Women

    Semester: 

    N/A

    Offered: 

    2020

    How does being a woman affect our behavior, our evaluations of ourselves, and our interactions with others? This course examines psychological science on women and girls in western industrialized societies, addressing such topics as gender stereotypes, girlhood, women and work, relationships, pregnancy and motherhood, mental health, violence against women, and women in later adulthood. We will consider these topics through an understanding of gender as a social construction, being mindful of the intersections of gender, sexuality, class, and race. Although focused on women’s lives and experiences, this course is highly relevant to people of all genders.
    ... Read more about Psychology of Women

    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes.... Read more about How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    This class explores the relationships of passion, love, and obligation that bound men and women over the course of nearly two millennia, from Rome in the first century B.C.E. to sixteenth-century Italy. In particular, it focuses on how those relationships were organized legally and institutionally, on the social roles created by such relationships, and on the connection (or lack thereof) between marriage, love, and sexual passion.... Read more about Sex, Love, and Marriage in the Middle Ages

    Psychopathology and the Family

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    In this course, we will explore how the family impacts psychopathology, including relapse, recovery, and resilience, for a member with a mental disorder. We will examine the relationship between the family and mental health conditions like anxiety, autism, depression, personality disorders, and schizophrenia from a life course and a family systems perspective.... Read more about Psychopathology and the Family

    Interracial Intimacy: Sex, Race, and Romance in the U.S.

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    What assumptions about race and sex are embedded in the term 'interracial,' and why are different types of interracial relationships viewed differently? How did White fears of relationships between Black men and White women influence the creation of the Ku Klux Klan? How did the story of Pocahontas influence the development of a settler colonial state?... Read more about Interracial Intimacy: Sex, Race, and Romance in the U.S.

    History and Human Capital

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    Explores a range of subjects concerning human capital, historically and comparatively. Topics include fertility, mortality, health, immigration, women's work, child labor, retirement, education, inequality, slavery, unionization, and governmental regulation of labor, all within the broader context of economic history.... Read more about History and Human Capital

    Psychology of Close Relationships

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course is an in-depth exploration of close relationships. Examples of topics to be covered include the biological bases of attraction; relationship formation; the end of relationships through break-up, divorce, or death; relationship satisfaction; deception; gender roles; same-sex relationships; loneliness; relationships and well-being; and public perceptions about relationships.... Read more about Psychology of Close Relationships

    Roman Catholic Christianity and Contemporary Crises

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    In the face of political and social change, and demands for racial, gender and economic justice, religious traditions struggle to respond while maintaining identity.  As an example, the Second Vatican Council of the early 1960s brought the Roman Catholic Church to a deeper engagement with modern academic scholarship such as historical critical methods of interpreting texts, environmental and evolutionary sciences’ relation to the Church, and the fundamental importance of modern philosophical and political thought to the institution’s self-understanding.... Read more about Roman Catholic Christianity and Contemporary Crises

    Love's Labors Found: Uncovering Histories of Emotional Labor

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2021

    How do love, care, and desire influence the value of work, and why is emotional labor – which is vital to child or elder care, domestic labor, nursing, teaching, and sex work – often considered to be something other than work? How and why do the racial and gender identities of workers affect the economic, social, and emotional value of their labor?... Read more about Love's Labors Found: Uncovering Histories of Emotional Labor

    Feminist Political Thought

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020

    What is feminism? What is patriarchy? What and who is a woman?  How does gender relate to sexuality, and to class and race?  Should housework be waged, should sex be for sale, and should feminists trust the state?  This course is an introduction to feminist political thought since the mid-twentieth century. It explores the key arguments that have preoccupied radical, socialist and liberal feminists, and how debates about equality, work, and identity matter today.

     

    ...

    Read more about Feminist Political Thought

    "The Words to Say It": 20th-century Women Writing in French, From Colette to Satrapi

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2020
    Motherhood, romantic love, independence, sexuality, citizenship, fantasy, death: these are just some of the themes explored in women's novels, written in French, during the twentieth century. Students will read four exemplary novels, exploring how they have finally become classics, even given what they say about life and what it means for women to write about it.... Read more about "The Words to Say It": 20th-century Women Writing in French, From Colette to Satrapi