Classes

    Metaphysical Poetry: The Seventeenth-Century Lyric and Beyond

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In an age of scientific and political revolution, how do poets respond when common beliefs about God, humans, cosmic and social order, consciousness, and gender have been taken away? Modern poetry starts in the seventeenth century when poets, notably women poets, sought new grounds for poetic expression.
     
    Additional Information:
    Faculty: Gordon Teskey
    Semester: Full Fall Term
    Time: Tuesday, 3:45 - 5:45 pm
    ENGLISH 90QM

    Themes in American Studies

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course will be divided into two parts. In the first we will examine the works of a group of contemporary scholars (Tiya Miles, Lisa Lowe, Marisa Fuentes, Sarah Haley, Saidiya Hartman, Jose Munoz, and Daphne Brooks) who are deeply interested in the function of gender in our societies and whose work is either exclusively or largely focused on the Americas. More importantly, each of the individuals whose work we will examine is deeply committed both to using traditional archives...
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    Women's voices in Brazilian culture(s)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this advanced language and culture course, students will refine their Portuguese language skills as they learn how Brazilian women have overcome prejudice and gender bias and adopted a leading role in the Brazilian culture and society. Through a range of texts (e.g. paintings, songs, movies, short stories, novels, tv shows) students will master complex grammatical structures and build on the communicative competence acquired in previous levels, with a particular emphasis on...
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    Resistant Masculinity: Evolving Notions of Black Masculinities in U.S. History

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This seminar explores the relationships between gender, race, power, and violence from the foundation of the American republic through the modern era. We will examine scholarly texts and primary sources (memoirs, letters, photographs, illustrations, films, etc.) in order to chart the evolution of racialized masculine ideals across eras, class distinctions, and regions. Moreover, we will discuss how African Americans adhered to and challenged conventional notions of “manhood”...
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    Advanced French I: The Contemporary Francophone World Through Cinema

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    In this advanced French language and culture course, you will explore francophone culture(s) through contemporary films. The course is designed to strengthen language proficiency, explore different registers of language, and further refine your grammatical understanding while offering an introduction to film analysis. You will engage in interactive communicative activities exploring themes such as regional differences, Paris and the banlieue, immigration, post-colonialism, cinematic self-portraits, and gender through readings such as film reviews, interviews with directors, and script...

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    Anyone's Germany: Redefining Identity in Contemporary German Fiction

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    What does it mean to be German today? Contemporary German society abounds with Grenzüberschreiter of varying kinds: generations who were raised in a divided Germany but came of age in a reunified, globalized Bundesrepublik; communities of multi-generational German nationals whose identities nevertheless inherit the problematic international labor-politics of both the East and the West; voices demanding greater visibility of Germany’s postcolonial legacy and sparking viral debates...
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    Questions of Theory

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    To explore key literary, cultural and critical theories, we pose questions through readings of classic and contemporary theorists, from Aristotle to Kant, Schiller, Arendt, Barthes, Foucault, Glissant, Ortiz, Kittler, and Butler, among others. Their approaches include aesthetics, (post)structuralism, (post)colonialism, media theory, gender theory, ecocriticism. Each seminar addresses a core reading and a cluster of variations. Weekly writing assignments will formulate a question that addresses the core texts to prepare for in-class discussions and interpretive activities. 

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    Tasting Place: Food and Culture in America

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    We often associate specific tastes and foods with particular places, memories, and experiences. What would it mean, then, to center taste in our study of place and culture? How can places be tasted, and tastes be placed? In this class, we explore the relationship between taste and place within American culture, discussing how elements of nation, region, and identity are created, absorbed, and imagined through foods and their represented forms. The word “taste” has multiple meanings...
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    Latinx, 1492 to 2022

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    The 530 years since Columbus’s arrival in Hispaniola have paid witness to the fall and rise of empires, the perseverance of colonial structures of power, and the construction and (re)creation of racial, sexual, and gendered identities. In the midst of such change and continuity, this course sets out to ask: what place does Latinx occupy in this long history? What does Latinidad look like when we trace it back 530 years, when we take 1492 to be its starting point instead of the 20th...
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    Latin Elegy

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Love, jealousy, angst… but make it fashion. Latin elegy on amatory themes flourished during the early years of the Augustan era (20s BCE), and the genre developed rapidly during the subsequent three decades. The canon of Latin literature records the names of four elegists (Gallus, Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid) and in this course we will read texts from all four, as well as works by elegists not included on that list, to track the hallmarks of this varied genre. One theme of the...
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    China's Banned Book: Reading Jin Ping Mei

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course will introduce students to the controversial masterpiece of Chinese fiction, The Plum in the Golden Vase (Jin Ping Mei). Censored for its erotic content, this sensational book had a profound impact on the development of Chinese fiction. A landmark in the history of the novel, The Plum in the Golden Vase shifts attention away from worthy heroes to examine the everyday exploits and desires of ordinary people. The work of an anonymous author, The Plum in the Golden Vase...
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    Advanced French I: The Contemporary Francophone World Through Cinema

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    In this advanced French language and culture course, you will explore francophone culture(s) through contemporary films. The course is designed to strengthen language proficiency, explore different registers of language, and further refine your grammatical understanding while offering an introduction to film analysis. You will engage in interactive communicative activities exploring themes such as regional differences, Paris and the banlieue, immigration, post-colonialism, cinematic self-portraits, and gender through readings such as film reviews, interviews with directors, and script...

    Read more about Advanced French I: The Contemporary Francophone World Through Cinema

    Staging Critique: French Theater and the Social Body

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    How has theater in France, from the 17th-century to the present, served as a site of political, social, and philosophical reflection? In this course, we will attempt to answer that question by studying a selection of plays representing the major trends, movements, and writers of French theater from Jean Racine to Marie NDiaye. We will look in particular at how theater privileges the body and the language of emotion to reformulate and respond to questions regarding the relationship...
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    "The Words to Say It": 20th Century Women Writing in French, From Colette to Satrapi

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Motherhood, romantic love, independence, sexuality, citizenship, fantasy, death: these are just some of the themes explored in women's novels, written in French, during the twentieth century. Students will read four exemplary novels, exploring how they have finally become classics, even given what they say about life and what it means for women to write about it. At the same time, the advent and development of feminist and/or queer literary criticism over the course of the 20th...
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    Cold War Germany: Art and Politics on Both Sides of the Wall

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course provides a survey of the history and culture of divided Germany during the Cold War. It examines the conditions leading to the foundation of two separate states, the role of the Allied Powers in East and West Germany, the ideological conflicts between them, and their different responses to dealing with a shared fascist past. Drawing on sources from literature, film, radio, theater and art, we will engage with key political debates and societal changes, such as the “...
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    Aesthetics of Resistance: Experimentation and Creative Protest in Avantgarde Theater and Performance Art

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course seeks to address the most crucial shifts and transformations that theater and performance practices have undergone since the advent of the literary and artistic avantgarde movements at the end of the 19th century. Through the study of examples from across Europe and the United States, we will examine phenomena such as the declining importance of “word theater” and the pre-scripted theatrical text; the éclatement of a clearly demarcated performance space and the...
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    Freedom: A Transatlantic Affair

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    The brilliantly witty German physicist and satirical author Georg Christoph Lichtenberg once remarked that “The American who first discovered Columbus made a horrible discovery” (“Der Amerikaner, der den Kolumbus zuerst entdeckte, machte eine böse Entdeckung.”). Taking inspiration from the insightfully eccentric perspectives that another culture might have on our own (and our own on it), this course interrogates the dynamics of transnational cultural transfer by examining case...
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