Classes

    Online Dating and the Transformation of Intimacy

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    Over the past twenty years, online dating has become the go-to way for people to seek intimacy. This has exacerbated problematic social forces such as sexism and racism. But many forms of attraction have also found expression as online dating has risen to prominence – with dozens of genders, sexualities, and relationship styles offered on OkCupid; platforms for threesomes, S&M enthusiasts, and gay men that like beards; and connections formed by many forms of mediation, from...
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    Threads: Histories and Theories of Clothing and Fashion

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course focuses on fashion and clothing in Japan from the medieval period to the present day. It aims to build a knowledge base of historically contextualized case studies through readings, lectures, and discussions. In the process, it explores questions about clothing as a site around which societal debates occur, where personal and collective identities are shaped, and where foundational philosophical ideas come into focus. Theoretical readings will allow students to apply...
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    Stories of Gender and Justice

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    With gender inequities and biases pervasive within and across cultures worldwide, and the global pandemics of gender-based violence and structural violence further intensified by the Covid-19 pandemic, how have individuals, groups, communities, and nations globally fought for (and against) gender justice? How have struggles against gender injustice intersected and conflicted with struggles against racial, ethnic, environmental, health, LGBTQIA+ and other forms of injustice? Gender...
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    Gender and Sexuality in Korean Pop Culture

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    What can the songs of BTS and Blackpink, the TV-show “Squid Game,” and the films Parasite andKim Chi-yŏng: Born 1982 teach us about gender roles in contemporary Korea? What roles do writers, musicians, and filmmakers play in shaping our thinking about sex and gender? How do competing ideas about sex shape the current system of cinematic, television, and popular music genres? These questions will be explored through case studies of Korean popular media, while the course will...
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    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes. It is a comprehensive study of the representation of gender, love and sexuality in African American and...
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    Advanced French II: Écrivons droit(s)/ Writing Right(s): Justice, Equity, Rights, and Writing

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    Through the lens of social justice issues in France and the Francophone world, this class will focus on writing as a means of civic engagement. You will interrogate topics such as colonialism, islamophobia, immigration, and sexism by studying a range of creative, analytical, and polemical texts, images, and film. This course builds on the communicative competence acquired in French 40, with a particular emphasis on developing your writing proficiency through creative and analytical writing projects such as description, portrait, film review, and polemical essays. This course will also...

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    African Architecture

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    This course examines architecture in African in an array of contexts and historical periods. Emphasis will be given to the shaping of the built environment around core cultural, social, political and economic contexts. Questions of style, materials, design considerations, gender, class, religion, building genres, colonialism and globalization will be addressed. Students will gain a knowledge not only of key monuments and models of African architecture, but also of differential scholarly approaches to these striking traditions. 

     

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    Wit, Irony, Comedy

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In life, as in literature, humor often takes us by surprise: it gives delight; it lightens our mood; it makes us laugh. The question is: why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery. If tragedy’s existence is all too easy to explain— suffering needs to be borne, and we yearn to find explanations for it—then it’s comedy that’s the enigma. Taking the comic seriously, this seminar provides a broad investigation into the psychological, sociological, philosophical, dramatic, and literary...
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    Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course investigates the realities of poverty through an intersectional lens, meaning that we will consider the simultaneous impact of race, gender, sexuality (and other identities) on economic insecurity. In what ways are conversations about poverty and its causes infused with assumptions and stereotypes related to gender, race, and sexuality? We hear so much in the media about what causes poverty – what is reality and what is myth? How do these myths operate to reinforce and...
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    Quilts and Quiltmaking

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    Are quilts the great American (folk) art? From intricately stitched whole-cloth quilts, to the improvisational patchworks of Gee's Bend; from the graphic simplicity of Amish quilts to the cozy pastels of depression-era quilts; from the Aids Quilt to art quilts; quilts have taken on extraordinary significance in American culture. This class surveys the evolution of quilt-making as a social practice, considering the role of quilts in articulations of gender, ethnic, class and religious identities, and...

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    Introduction to the Study of East Asia: Issues and Methods

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This interdisciplinary and team-taught course provides an introduction to several of the approaches and methods through which the societies and cultures of East Asia can be studied at Harvard, including history, philosophy, literary studies, political science, film studies, anthropology and gender studies. We consider both commonalities and differences across the region, and explore how larger processes of imperialism, modernization, and globalization have shaped contemporary East Asian societies and their future trajectories. 

     

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    Literature, Diaspora, Migration, and Trauma

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    This course examines a diverse range of creative and critical discourses on trauma and the global African; East, South, Southeast, and West Asian (Chinese, Indian, Iranian, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese); and Middle Eastern (Jewish, Palestinian, Lebanese); as well as Latin American diasporas. We focus on the connections among diasporas, displacement, migration, and trauma, and on the relationships of these phenomena and constructions and understandings of artistic and cultural identities, ethnicity/race...

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    The Dark Side of Big Data

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Does it sometimes feel like Instagram ads are listening a little too closely to your conversations? Have you ever wondered if certain corporations might own images of your face? Today, fears abound that algorithms are not only populating our lives with annoying targeted advertisements but might also be creating the most unequal societies that have ever existed. In this interdisciplinary seminar, we will explore key methodological overlaps and differences between humanistic and...
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    Suburban Wars: The American Suburb in the Twentieth Century

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    For as long as suburbs have existed, they have been battlefields—sites of contestation where Americans have fought over their social significance, their place in the political economy of urban areas, and their role in the nation’s identity. This undergraduate seminar explores questions about the meaning of suburbs, their relationship with cities, and the ways that suburbs have intersected with the histories of race, class, gender, capitalism, architecture, political ideology, and...
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