Classes

    Online Dating and the Transformation of Intimacy

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    Over the past twenty years, online dating has become the go-to way for people to seek intimacy. This has exacerbated problematic social forces such as sexism and racism. But many forms of attraction have also found expression as online dating has risen to prominence – with dozens of genders, sexualities, and relationship styles offered on OkCupid; platforms for threesomes, S&M enthusiasts, and gay men that like beards; and connections formed by many forms of mediation, from...
    Read more about Online Dating and the Transformation of Intimacy

    Women's voices in Brazilian culture(s)

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this advanced language and culture course, students will refine their Portuguese language skills as they learn how Brazilian women have overcome prejudice and gender bias and adopted a leading role in the Brazilian culture and society. Through a range of texts (e.g. paintings, songs, movies, short stories, novels, tv shows) students will master complex grammatical structures and build on the communicative competence acquired in previous levels, with a particular emphasis on...
    Read more about Women's voices in Brazilian culture(s)

    Threads: Histories and Theories of Clothing and Fashion

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This course focuses on fashion and clothing in Japan from the medieval period to the present day. It aims to build a knowledge base of historically contextualized case studies through readings, lectures, and discussions. In the process, it explores questions about clothing as a site around which societal debates occur, where personal and collective identities are shaped, and where foundational philosophical ideas come into focus. Theoretical readings will allow students to apply...
    Read more about Threads: Histories and Theories of Clothing and Fashion

    Stories of Gender and Justice

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    With gender inequities and biases pervasive within and across cultures worldwide, and the global pandemics of gender-based violence and structural violence further intensified by the Covid-19 pandemic, how have individuals, groups, communities, and nations globally fought for (and against) gender justice? How have struggles against gender injustice intersected and conflicted with struggles against racial, ethnic, environmental, health, LGBTQIA+ and other forms of injustice? Gender...
    Read more about Stories of Gender and Justice

    Power to the People: Black Power, Radical Feminism, and Gay Liberation

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    An introduction to the radical American social change movements of the 1960s and 70s. We will examine the specific historical conditions that allowed each of these movements to develop, the interconnections and contradictions among them, and why their political power faded, only to reemerge in new manifestations today. Along with historical analysis, we will examine primary source materials, manifestos, autobiographies, and media coverage from the period, as well as relevant films, music, and fiction. The class will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. Midterm and final assignments...

    Read more about Power to the People: Black Power, Radical Feminism, and Gay Liberation

    How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The word 'love' is almost never used in any portrayal or description of the African American community's daily life in contemporary media and in the social sciences. But love, as a human experience, is central to our understanding of what it means to be a vital member of a culture and society and thus respected, nurtured, etc. This seminar examines the love that difference makes. It is a comprehensive study of the representation of gender, love and sexuality in African American and...
    Read more about How Sweet is it to be Loved By You: Black Love and the Emotional Politics of Respect

    Tattoo: Histories and Practices

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    Tattooing has been practiced in many different social and cultural settings, in many different time periods, to different ends. In the United States, tattooing was long associated with marginalized and stigmatized groups, but since the 1970s, has become increasingly popular and even mainstream. This seminar style class will explore distinct regional histories of tattoo, the development of tattooing in the US, and the different ways that contemporary tattoo practitioners situate themselves historically and negotiate boundaries of race, class and gender. We will also consider tattoo as an...

    Read more about Tattoo: Histories and Practices

    Asian America in Popular Culture

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    The release of Crazy Rich Asians in 2018 was a significant cultural moment for Asian America: the first major Hollywood picture with a predominantly Asian American cast in over twenty years, the film was an immediate box office success, and followed by a proliferation of mainstream Asian American productions, including The Farewell, Indian Matchmaking, and Minari. This recent growth of Asian American media is especially remarkable, given that Asian America has been relatively...
    Read more about Asian America in Popular Culture

    Poetry Workshop: Form and Content

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this workshop, we’ll look closely at the craft-based choices poets make, and track the effects they have upon what we as readers are made to think and feel. How can implementing similar strategies better prepare us to engage the questions making up our own poetic material? We’ll also talk about content. What can poetry reveal about the ways our interior selves are shaped by public realities like race, class, sexuality, injustice and more?
    ... Read more about Poetry Workshop: Form and Content

    Wit, Irony, Comedy

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    In life, as in literature, humor often takes us by surprise: it gives delight; it lightens our mood; it makes us laugh. The question is: why? Laughter, in many ways, is a mystery. If tragedy’s existence is all too easy to explain— suffering needs to be borne, and we yearn to find explanations for it—then it’s comedy that’s the enigma. Taking the comic seriously, this seminar provides a broad investigation into the psychological, sociological, philosophical, dramatic, and literary...
    Read more about Wit, Irony, Comedy

    The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: The Ethics of Art

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    What, if anything, is the relationship between art and morality? Can art be immoral? Or is it a mistake to evaluate a work of art in such terms? Can the moral of a content of a work bear on its aesthetic value, that is, whether it is good art? What of the moral status of artists—does the (im)morality of an artist bear on the success of her work? Should art serve as an instrument of moral education? A force for liberation? A method of unifying people? How do the arts shape who and...
    Read more about The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful: The Ethics of Art

    Tasting Place: Food and Culture in America

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    We often associate specific tastes and foods with particular places, memories, and experiences. What would it mean, then, to center taste in our study of place and culture? How can places be tasted, and tastes be placed? In this class, we explore the relationship between taste and place within American culture, discussing how elements of nation, region, and identity are created, absorbed, and imagined through foods and their represented forms. The word “taste” has multiple meanings...
    Read more about Tasting Place: Food and Culture in America

    Con Artist Nation: Scams, Schemes, and American Dreams

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    With the popularity of shows like Inventing Anna and The Dropout, 2022 might be called the year of the scammer. Yet contemporary con artists come from a long lineage of carnival barkers, snake oil salesmen, and self-proclaimed miracle workers. This class examines the conditions of American capitalism and political populism that gave way to a society of schemers and dupes. We will consider how exploitation and self-invention were ultimately bound up in issues of class, race, gender, and religion. How did swindlers create or subvert stereotypes in search of profits? Who were imagined as...

    Read more about Con Artist Nation: Scams, Schemes, and American Dreams

    Analyzing Pop Music

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022

    How can music analysis inform the way we understand, listen to, and write about popular music? This course introduces tools and methods for studying the features, technologies, and compositional styles of post-2000 popular music. Weekly readings will address issues of form, rhythm & meter, instrumental and vocal timbre, computer-assisted analysis, vocal performance, and music videos. An ever-present concern of the class will be the ways in which these analytical tools and methods interact with issues of race, gender, and sexuality. The repertoire under study in the readings will...

    Read more about Analyzing Pop Music

    Race and Gender: Landscape Architecture as Practice, Profession, and Discipline

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2022
    This seminar interrogates Landscape Architecture, both the production of a discipline and a profession, by exploring what it would mean to place women and people of color in the center of such discourses. As scholars and journalists have increasingly argued, the United States has been shaped at its core by concepts of race and gender. Histories ranging from democracy to that of mortgages and property ownership have been shown to be deeply grounded in the ideas of race and shaped by...
    Read more about Race and Gender: Landscape Architecture as Practice, Profession, and Discipline

    Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    This course investigates the realities of poverty through an intersectional lens, meaning that we will consider the simultaneous impact of race, gender, sexuality (and other identities) on economic insecurity. In what ways are conversations about poverty and its causes infused with assumptions and stereotypes related to gender, race, and sexuality? We hear so much in the media about what causes poverty – what is reality and what is myth? How do these myths operate to reinforce and...
    Read more about Gender, Race, and Poverty in the United States

    Quilts and Quiltmaking

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023

    Are quilts the great American (folk) art? From intricately stitched whole-cloth quilts, to the improvisational patchworks of Gee's Bend; from the graphic simplicity of Amish quilts to the cozy pastels of depression-era quilts; from the Aids Quilt to art quilts; quilts have taken on extraordinary significance in American culture. This class surveys the evolution of quilt-making as a social practice, considering the role of quilts in articulations of gender, ethnic, class and religious identities, and...

    Read more about Quilts and Quiltmaking

    Artificial Intelligences: Body, Art, and Media in Modern Germany

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    Our world is deluged in “tech”—big tech, biotech, tech innovation and disruption—but how much do we really know about what “technology" means? What does it tell us about the difference between the real and the artificial, the mechanical and the organic, the body and the prosthetic? And how is technology imbedded in things like art, media, race, and the performance of gender? This course considers how these questions, far from being new, have in fact been broached continuously over...
    Read more about Artificial Intelligences: Body, Art, and Media in Modern Germany

    The Politics of Personal Writing

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2023
    A long tradition of feminist writing asserts that the personal is political. In this creative writing class, we will critically examine the work of feminist and queer authors such as Dorothy Allison, Roxane Gay, Cathy Park Hong, Audre Lorde, Imani Perry, and Margaret Talusen who use personal experience as a starting point for arguments about class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Examining how these authors draw on traditions crafted by earlier authors such as James Baldwin...
    Read more about The Politics of Personal Writing

Pages