Classes

    Experimental Economics

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course provides an introduction to experimental methods and their applications in economics. We will focus on (i) the use of lab experiments in establishing causal effects, testing models, and illuminating mechanisms; (ii) field experiments in behavioral economics; and (ii) the measurement of preference parameters and behavioral traits in lab-in-the-field settings. Topics include bounded rationality, wishful thinking, moral values and social image concerns, gender, the measurement of preferences in lab and large-scale survey settings, and the explanatory power of behavioral traits for field behaviors.... Read more about Experimental Economics

    Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    This course is intended to provide hands-on practice toward doing research on Latinx issues, with an approach grounded in the understanding that terms ‘Hispanic’ and ‘Latinidad’ are not static concepts and, at the same time, not a homogeneous mix. We will examine culture, intellectual production, languages, economics, and political thought, as well as the dynamics of Latino/a/e people in the United States. Throughout the class, students will become familiar with a wide range of thinkers, currents, concepts, topics, and they will be exposed to frameworks of decolonial history and knowledge. The class will also facilitate conversations about the current place of Latinx cultures within the U.S. imaginary, including the immigrant groups from Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean, as well Indigenous and Afro-diasporic communities.... Read more about Topics in Latinx Studies: Imagining Latinidad

    Gender, Sex, and Violence in Global Politics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022
    In this course, we will consider the international dimensions of gender, sex and violence, both within the context of war and during periods of peace. Both academic scholarship and current policy debates are informed by powerful—and often unquestioned—assumptions about sex, gender and violence. Recent research has challenged some of these ideas, and policymakers have responded with calls for better data, increased attention to long-hidden problems, and new strategies to confront these difficult problems. In the course, we will consider a series of policy-relevant questions on the politics of sex, gender, and violence.... Read more about Gender, Sex, and Violence in Global Politics

    Creativity Research: Eccentrics, Geniuses, and Harvard Students

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021
    Examines human creativity from three perspectives: a) empirical research sources, b) case studies of eminent creative achievers, and c) ourselves as creative subjects. Topics include the definition and measurement of creativity, the creative process, the neuroscience of creativity, the creative personality, the role of family life and culture in creativity, the relationship of creativity to IQ, gender differences, and the relationship of creativity to psychopathology. The course format will consist of a combination of lectures, student presentations, and discussion. Students will write a final paper on the topic of their choice related to creativity.... Read more about Creativity Research: Eccentrics, Geniuses, and Harvard Students

    Morphosemantics

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course explores how nominal features like person, number, and grammatical gender are formally marked as well as interpreted, with greatest attention paid to grammatical gender. Are categories such as “masculine”, “feminine”, and “neuter” linguistically on equal footing, or are there asymmetries in how they are morphologically expressed or in how they map onto meanings? Are these categories represented consistently across languages? Depending on enrollee/participant interests, topics may include the representation of “markedness”; morphosyntactic defaults; connections between notional and non-notional gender assignment to nouns; gender and scope interactions; the interpretability of fake indexicals; and singular they.... Read more about Morphosemantics

    Identity and the Self in the Medieval Greek Tradition

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021
    This seminar explores the construction and complexity of identities in the Greek tradition (300-1500).  Readings include fascinating narratives, biographies, and autobiographies. Students will learn how to approach these rich texts from combined historical and literary perspectives, while gaining familiarity with current cutting-edge research. Questions for discussion include political, religious, and ethnic identity in late antiquity and Byzantium, the meaning of being “Roman” and “Greek,” the plasticity of self-representation, and the interpretation of religion, gender, and class as both social and cultural categories.... Read more about Identity and the Self in the Medieval Greek Tradition

    Racial Education

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021

    In this seminar, we will think together about education as a site of radical imagination, turning to learning spaces from the 20th century to the present where people have envisioned and attempted to bring about different worlds. Major topics of the course will include: education and social change, critical pedagogy, the imagination, abolition, and worldbuilding. Throughout the course, we will look at course catalogues, manifestos, memoirs, newspapers, and other primary sources as well as theory and secondary scholarship in social movement history, critical pedagogy, literary studies, Black Studies, and women & gender studies. Together, we will ask some of the following questions: In what ways is education part of larger struggles for freedom and liberation? How do each of these educational projects seek to radically imagine and bring about other worlds? What kinds of learning spaces do we want to build today?... Read more about Racial Education

    An Intro to History, Politics, & Public Health: Theories of Disease Distr. & Health Inequities

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2021
    This course offers an introduction to the social and scientific contexts, content, and implications of theories of disease distribution, past and present. It considers how these theories shape questions people ask about--and explanations and interventions they offer for--patterns of health, disease, and well-being in their societies.... Read more about An Intro to History, Politics, & Public Health: Theories of Disease Distr. & Health Inequities

    Sexuality and Public Health

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2022

    This course provides an introduction to the breadth of research and research methods in the study of sexuality and sexual health promotion in diverse contexts and populations. Students will develop skills needed to carry out epidemiologic research and community-based interventions related to sexual health promotion.... Read more about Sexuality and Public Health