Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask

Citation:

Bowles, Hannah Riley, Linda Babcock, and Lei Lai. “Social incentives for gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations: Sometimes it does hurt to ask”. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 103.1 (2007): , 103, 1, 84–103. Web. Copy at http://www.tinyurl.com/ope9br8
social_incentives.pdf495 KB

Abstract:

Four experiments show that gender differences in the propensity to initiate negotiations may be explained by differential treatment of men and women when they attempt to negotiate. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants evaluated written accounts of candidates who did or did not initiate negotiations for higher compensation. Evaluators penalized female candidates more than male candidates for initiating negotiations. In Experiment 3, participants evaluated videotapes of candidates who accepted compensation offers or initiated negotiations. Male evaluators penalized female candidates more than male candidates for initiating negotiations; female evaluators penalized all candidates for initiating negotiations. Perceptions of niceness and demandingness explained resistance to female negotiators. In Experiment 4, participants adopted the candidate’s perspective and assessed whether to initiate negotiations in same scenario used in Experiment 3. With male evaluators, women were less inclined than men to negotiate, and nervousness explained this effect. There was no gender difference when evaluator was female.

Publisher's Version

Last updated on 08/20/2014