Yvette Efevbera

Yvette Efevbera

Brigham and Women's Hospital Division of Global Health Equity, Guinea
Yvette Efevbera

As an intern with the Brigham and Women Hospital’s (BWH) Division of Global Health Equity, Yvette Efevbera, M.Sc., conducted independent research under Division Chief Dr. Paul E. Farmer on understanding problems affecting young women in Guinea following the 2014-15 Ebola crisis. Findings support her ongoing dissertation research, which quantitatively and qualitatively assesses how girl child marriage affects the health, development, and well-being of women and their children, and will be shared with BWH affiliates and the Office of the President to strengthen health systems activities following the Ebola epidemic.

Yvette Efevbera, M.Sc. is a doctoral student at the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, specializing in the well-being of children and women and program leadership. Yvette conducted independent research in the Republic of Guinea as an intern with the Brigham and Women Hospital’s (BWH) Division of Global Health Equity. She conducted research to support the health and well-being of women locally. Under the guidance of Division Chief Paul Farmer, Yvette supported the Division’s vision of using research to “meet the needs of populations in the world's poorest areas.” Findings from her summer research were shared with BWH affiliates and the Office of the President, with the aim of strengthening health systems activities following the Ebola epidemic. Yvette’s summer research project specifically focused on understanding problems affecting young women in Guinea following the 2014-15 Ebola crisis. She independently designed and implemented qualitative research studies that use techniques including observation, brief ethnographic interviewing, and in-depth interviews to understand local perceptions and experiences. This work complimented her ongoing dissertation research, which quantitatively and qualitatively assesses how girl child marriage affects the health, development, and well-being of women and their children. Noting that U.N. agencies, bilateral donors including the U.S. government, and private donors have invested millions in combating child marriage, the findings of this research  provided important and timely evidence for policy design. Importantly, these findings ensured that the voices and perspectives of those most affected are incorporated into discussions.

Intern type