Georgina Waylen

Georgina Waylen

Professor of Politics, University of Manchester
Co-Director, Feminism and Institutionalism International Network
WAPPP Fellow
Georgina Waylen

Georgina Waylen's main research interests lie in the fields of comparative politics and political economy. As a WAPPP Fellow, Georgina's research explores the gender dynamics of institutional change. 

Bio

Georgina Waylen is a Professor of Politics at the University of Manchester, UK. Prior to this she was a Professor of Politics at the University of Sheffield and she previously taught at the Universities of Salford and East Anglia. She has also held visiting positions at Simon Fraser University, Canada, 2005, the University of Witswatersrand, South Africa 2003, and Stanford University, USA 1996. She is a co-director of the Feminism and Institutionalism International Network (FIIN) and a member of the UK Academy of Social Sciences.  From 2012-2017 she is the PI for a five year European Research Council Advanced Grant 'Understanding Institutional Change: A Gender Perspective' (see www.manchester.ac.uk/uic for more details).

Her main research interests lie in the fields of comparative politics/political economy with a focus on gender and politics, international political economy, transitions to democracy, and governance and institutions.  Her research on democratization culminated in a book Engendering Transitions: Women's Mobilization, Institutions and Gender Outcomes (Oxford University Press 2007) which was awarded the 2008 APSA Victoria Schuck prize for the best book published on women and politics.  She also published in a broad range of journals including World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, New Political Economy and Public Administration.  Recently she has been collaborating to develop a feminist institutionalism as part of the Feminism and Institutionalism International Network (FIIN) with colleagues from Edinburgh, Rutgers and University of New South Wales, Australia.  And as part of her ERC Advanced Grant she is researching how different forms of institutional change are gendered.

Research Topic

Changing Institutions: Gender, Formal rules, Informal rules, and Behaviour Change