Harvard Gender Course Guide 2016-2017

Gender Course Guide Listing

Economic Development: Theory and Evidence

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

PED-101 is a semester-long course that aims to study theories of economic (under)development and scrutinize empirical evidence in order to glean insights on development policy. The course will identify key features of the development process across countries, and develop an analytical framework, grounded in economic theory, to better understand these patterns. We will then apply our frameworks combined with rigorous empirical evidence to identify when and how public policies can enable economic growth and development.

Establishing Loving Spaces for Learning: Nurturing Gender and Sexual Identity Dev in U.S. Schools

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

This course explores both the role of gender and sexuality in shaping young peoples' schooling experiences, opportunities, and outcomes, and the role of schooling experiences in shaping young people's notions of gender and sexuality. In many ways, the course is about the "hidden curriculum" of heteronormativity, or the subtle practices in schools that privilege heterosexual, gendered identities and ways of being.

Feminist Legal Theory

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This course will survey the most important sources of feminist thinking in the North Atlantic, including the US. We will pay attention to the rise and fall of feminist ideas; to competitor theoretical frames and ongoing contests among different feminist worldviews for influence on law; to nonwestern sources of feminist legal thought; and to modes of transmitting feminist ideas from one national, regional, and/or international system to another.

Feminist Political Philosophy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

Work in feminist political philosophy is extraordinarily diverse. Some projects apply traditional philosophical tools and concepts to questions of particular feminist concern; others reject those tools and ideas altogether and propose alternatives allegedly better suited to theorizing about gender. Many regard "the personal is political" as the unifying insight of contemporary feminist philosophy. This will be the unifying theme of our study as well, as we work to better understand that slogan and explore its implications.

Feminist Theory and The*logy

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This seminar seeks to provide a space for exploring the intersections of feminist theory with feminist the*logy and Feminist Studies in Religion. We will focus on different feminist categories of analysis, discuss different feminist the*logical directions and explore how their theoretical frameworks, methods and visions are shaped by their different socio-cultural-religious locations and struggles. In so doing we will engage in a participatory democratic style of learning.

Frida Kahlo's Mexico: Women, Arts, and Revolution

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

This course revolves around the short, creative life of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, one of the most prominent figures in art history, as a window to the cultural and political revolution that shaped Mexico's identity in the twentieth century and continues to influence Latinos today. Through Frida's life and artwork, we see how two international influences in Mexico's cultural and political life—Soviet politics and French surrealism—merged with national agendas that sought to redefine Mexico's identity through the integration of their indigenous heritage.

Fundamentals of Leadership Across Difference

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Whether your aspirations are to work domestically or internationally, collaboration across difference is an inescapable imperative of leadership for the public interest. Contemporary levels of conflict and instability make the capacity to work effectively across difference a fundamental requirement of political, diplomatic, and military leadership. Innovation in the government sector is dependent on the capacity for policy makers to work across political divides and increasing involves collaboration across agencies and with business and civic leaders.

Fundamentals of Leadership Across Difference

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Whether your aspirations are to work domestically or internationally, collaboration across difference is an inescapable imperative of leadership for the public interest. Contemporary levels of conflict and instability make the capacity to work effectively across difference a fundamental requirement of political, diplomatic, and military leadership. Innovation in the government sector is dependent on the capacity for policy makers to work across political divides and increasingly involves collaboration across agencies and with business and civic leaders.

Gender and Health: Introductory Perspectives

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

This course will introduce students to gender as a theoretical concept and a category of analysis in public health ? specifically, the ways in which gender contributes to differentially structuring women and men's experiences of health. The course proposes to answer such questions as: How can understanding gender structures help us interpret public health research? How has gender influenced the construction of public health in diverse societies? How do our social frameworks and structures, such as gender, affect people's experiences and expectations of health?

Gender and the Making of Modern South Asia

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

This course will explore gender history in 20th-century South Asia as well as the methodological importance of history within South Asian gender studies.  We will use gender analysis to understand the shaping of nationalism and anti-colonialism, public and private spheres, the state, conflict, popular culture, and the construction of South Asia as a region. Further, we will trace the development of women’s movements and feminisms in modern South Asia.

Gender in Korean Literature and Film

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This course looks in depth at issues regarding women and gender in Korean literature and film. While we explore literary and cinematic representations of gender, the main goal of the class is to examine literature and film as sites for the very construction of gender. Readings include contemporary literary and theoretical works, as well as historical texts from the Colonial period (1910-1945) and the Chosŏn Dynasty (1392-1910), in order to understand women’s issues in the context of historical development.

Gender Violence Legal Policy Workshop

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This workshop offers the student hands-on experience in analyzing, evaluating, and creating legal policy on a range of issues related to gender violence. The three main areas of concentration are campus sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and sex trafficking and prostitution. We advise government officials (local, state and federal); national, international, and local advocacy groups working to stop gender violence; and individuals needing assistance in knowing their rights or accessing services.

Gender Violence, Law and Social Justice

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This course offers an in-depth examination of the phenomenon of gender-motivated violence. Following a consideration of the prevalence and variation of types of sexual violence and coercion around the world, we consider questions such as: How, if at all, is violence against women different from other types of violence? How effective have legal strategies to address violence against women been, and what shifts in thinking about gender-motivated violence would be necessary finally to eradicate it?

Gender, Biology, and the Body

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This course will examine how naturalists, biologists, social scientists, sexologists, and journalists have understood questions of sex, gender and sexuality since the Enlightenment. We will become familiar with a variety of theoretical interventions in the field of feminist science studies and deploy them to understand both the scientific construction of sex and gender and the gendered culture of science.

Gender, Biology, and the Body

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2017

This course will examine how naturalists, biologists, social scientists, sexologists, and journalists have understood questions of sex, gender and sexuality since the Enlightenment. We will become familiar with a variety of theoretical interventions in the field of feminist science studies and deploy them to understand both the scientific construction of sex and gender and the gendered culture of science.

<embed>
Copy and paste this code to your website.